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OAA Annual Conference 2014

Wednesday May 07 2014 - FAIRMONT THE QUEEN ELIZABETH, MONTREAL

OAA Conference 2012

Conference Program



Wednesday May 07 2014

Registration: 7:30 AM to 8:00 PM
Continental Breakfast: 7:30 AM - 9:00 AM
Refreshment Breaks: Morning 10:00 AM - 10:30 AM,
Afternoon 3:30 PM - 4:00 PM
Sponsor Displays: 8:00 AM - 5:00 PM
8:30 AM - 11:45 AM

01AC

Contract Administration and General Review

This Session is sold out

3 ConEd learning hours

Presenters:

Tim Gorley, OAA, RAIC
Director, IBI Group, Executive Vice President 

Allen Humphries, OAA, LEED® AP BD&C
Senior Associate, Senior Project Architect, HOK

Course Outline

This phase of a construction project accounts for approximately 25 to 35 % of an architect’s total fee and carries with it the largest percentage of claims. Problems not caught earlier in checking, or at bidding or plan or shop drawing review stages will become manifest during construction. Sometimes not discovered until well after the construction is completed and the other parties have vanished. Learn the recommended practice and procedures in administering a project through the construction phase.    

Topics include:

  • Introduction - The Construction Phase
  • Participants - The roles and responsibilities of the key parties during construction
  • Before we begin - Methods of Project Delivery , types of contacts, bonds, insurance, agreements
  • Meetings and deliverables
  • Administrative paperwork
  • Contract Close out procedures

 

 

12:45 PM - 2:15 PM

02AC

Planning and Development Approvals

1.5 ConEd learning hours

Presenter
Martin Rendl
, B.E.S., M.Sc.(Pl.), MCIP, RPP, Martin Rendl Associates. 

Course Outline

This lecture provides an overview of the planning and land development approvals process in Ontario. This includes the roles architects, other professionals and authorities having jurisdiction play in that process. The lecture will describe the various planning tools that implement planning legislation and provide a guide to understanding and navigating the complex development approvals process. 

  • Explain why the land use planning and development process is relevant to architects.
  • Identify the ways the province and municipalities plan for growth.
  • Identify the authorities that have decision-making powers within the planning process.
  • List, describe, and compare the planning instruments that control land development in Ontario.
  • Describe the circumstances under which planning instruments constitute applicable law.
  • Explain how the various planning instruments are amended.
  • Outline the criteria used to evaluate planning applications.
  • Identify issues that can affect the approval process and how to address them.
  • Describe the architect’s role in the planning and development approval process.
  • Describe the planning powers of municipalities to control the exterior design of buildings.
  • Describe the role of the architect as an expert witness before the Ontario Municipal Board.
  • Describe what the Ontario Municipal Board takes into consideration in making planning decisions.
  • Describe the planning powers of municipalities to control the exterior design of buildings.

2:30 PM - 5:30 PM

03AC

Legal Aspects: Contract Law, Professional Liability & Architects Contract

3 ConEd learning hours

Presenters

Charles Simco, Shibley Righton LLP, Barristers and Solicitors
Charles Greenberg, B. Arch, FRAIC. OAA Practice Advisor

Course Outline

PART I – Contract Law and Professional Liability

This session will demystify the law and the basics of what architects need to know about common law, the judicial process and professional liability. Topics will include:

  • The Ontario Courts System
  • Law of Contracts
  • Law of Negligence
  • Professional Liability and ProDemnity Insurance Company

PART II - Architects Contracts 

Regardless of the type or size of project, architects should prepare and execute written contracts, with clients, consultants and employees. This session looks at standard types of contracts for architectural projects and other types of agreements.

Topics will include: 

  • Types of contracts architects use and why – including Client/Architect, Consultant/Architect, employment contracts;
  • The agreement process, documentation and execution of contracts;
  • Issues of executing contracts with corporations, building committees and boards
  • Establishing personal goals for processes of contract negotiations on such matters as fees, retainers, partial services
  • Various forms of standard and hybrid contracts

 

 

2:00 PM - 5:30 PM

01CE

Delivering Commercial Passivhaus Projects

3 ConEd learning hours

This session is being offered again Thursday, May 8, 8:30 AM –12:00 PM and Friday, May 9, 2014 8:30 AM - 12:00 PM 

Course Outline

The opportunity to create commercial Passivhaus projects in the North America is wide open. Unfortunately, there is little information available to the designer to guide them in the design and implementation of commercial Passivhaus design.  Also, much of what is available is written to European standards which differ in some significant ways from North American design standards.

This presentation will detail the basics of commercial Passivhaus design, the potential challenges that must be overcome and inherent opportunities to create exceptional projects. Recent built examples of the first North American Passivhaus projects will also be presented.

Learning Objectives

  1. Describe the basics of Passivhaus means and methods
  2. Describe the differences between residential and commercial Passivhaus
  3. Describe the three categories of Passivhaus buildings and their specific application
  4. Describe potential synergies available to the designer in high performance buildings

Speakers

Adam Cohen
As an active design/builder and green building expert, Adam Cohen is a leading North American Passivhaus practitioner whose innovative work on commercial high performance building has made his expertise sought-after for projects across North America. He is a principal partner in Structures Design/Build, LLC (www.structuresdb.com), Passiv Structures, LLC (www.passivscience.com) and Quantum Architects, LLC, (www.quantum-architects.com). 

Mr. Cohen is recognized as a national leader in the Passivhaus movement and has presented technical papers at both national and international Passivhaus conferences. His leadership in commercial Passivhaus design has made him a sought after speaker, consultant and teacher of advanced courses in Passivhaus ultra-low energy design. 

 

2:00 PM - 5:30 PM

02CE

AODA Public Spaces Standards: What You Need to Know

3 ConEd learning hours

This session is being offered again Thursday, May 8, 8:30 AM –12:00 PM

Course Outline

This session will outline the application requirements and technical details of the Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act's, Design of Public Spaces Standards. These standards came into effect in early 2013, defining mandatory accessibility requirements for the design of public spaces in Ontario, such as sidewalks and pathways, recreational trails, playgrounds, outdoor public eating areas, and public parking facilities. This session will introduce the Design of Public Spaces Standards and, through interactive group activities, provide participants with an opportunity to explore the application of the standards to real projects.

Learning Objectives

  1. Understand the legal obligation for architectural projects to comply with the AODA Design of Public Spaces Standards
  2. Understand the application criteria and technical requirements of the AODA Design of Public Spaces Standards
  3. Understand the jurisdictional relationships between the accessibility requirements of the AODA Design of Public Spaces Standards, Ontario Building Code and Municipal Bylaws

Presenter

Bob Topping is an architect and accessibility consultant; a member of the Ontario Association of Architects and the Royal Architectural Institute of Canada. Bob earned a Bachelor of Architecture (1979) from Strathclyde University, Glasgow, Scotland. He is the president of DesignABLE Environments Inc., and a founding member of the Global Alliance on Accessible Technologies and Environments (GAATES). Bob has over twenty-five years of experience practising and teaching architecture with a specialization and interest in the fields of barrier-free design and universal design. In his role as an accessibility consultant, Bob has assisted design teams realize the benefits of universal design and accessibility on projects within the justice, institutional, commercial, education, health care and entertainment sectors. Bob has presented workshops and participated in conferences around the world, educating design professionals on universal design of the built environment.

2:00 PM - 5:30 PM

03CE

Natural Ventilation: The Art of Balancing Heat and Air

3 ConEd learning hours

This session is being offered again Thursday, May 8, 2014 2:00 – 5:30 PM

Course Outline

This session will cover the basics of natural ventilation, the design process and project examples.  It will focus on the following key points.

What is Natural Ventilation- A definition as well as how it impacts designers.

Human requirements- What are people’s expectations and their base needs (ventilation, temperature etc.) from natural ventilation.

Driving forces- The physics behind Natural Ventilation.

Design process- An examination of the typical methods for implementing natural ventilation followed by a recommended improved approach.

Examples- Project examples completed by RWDI.

Is it working? Conclusions and closing thoughts about Natural Ventilation.

Learning Objectives:

  1. How to identify risks and opportunities in buildings for natural ventilation.
  2. A process to develop a viable natural ventilation system.
  3. The range of simple and complex modeling and analysis tools available to support design.
  4. How other building designs have incorporated natural ventilation into a variety of projects. 

Speakers:

John Alberico is a Project Director specializing in air quality and microclimate assessments. He joined RWDI in 1988, and became a Principal in 2004.  He is a Canadian Certified Environmental Professional.

As a Project Director, he provides overall technical direction to engineering teams on air quality and microclimate projects ensuring that a high level of service is provided and RWDI’s interests are preserved on all projects.

John’s area of technical expertise is in exhaust and dust dispersion, and wind flow around buildings, which has included involvement in several hundred projects providing expert consultation, and conducting both numerical and wind tunnel modelling. His primary focus has been in the institutional, healthcare, higher education and pharmaceutical sectors.  His involvement in many of these projects has included environmental impact assessments and Certificates of Approval in Ontario.

John has also managed engineering teams that have provided air quality, odour, dust, ventilation, noise, acoustic and vibration assessments for a broad range of applications on local, national and international projects. These have included pits and quarries, landfills, composting facilities, roadways, residential developments, and industrial facilities in addition to healthcare, higher education and pharmaceutical facilities.

Michael Carl is a Senior Technical Coordinator at RWDI, specializing in computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and building science.  Michael received his Bachelor of Engineering from the University of Guelph in 2005 and his Master of Applied Science in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Victoria in 2008.  Over the past five years at RWDI Michael has worked on numerous projects using CFD, including evaluating the HVAC system for the grand Mosque at Makkah and the transport of sand over large stretches of newly developed railway in Saudi Arabia.  Michael has also focused on natural and mechanical ventilation in garages, bus terminals and atria including the coupling of advanced modeling techniques such as CFD with RWDI’s in-house wind tunnel and analytical models to evaluate and improve design.

2:00 PM - 5:30 PM

04CE

The Architects, the Developers, and the Planner. How to create a new downtown?

3 ConEd learning hours

Course Outline

The City of Markham is in the process of creating a new downtown to transform itself from a suburban community into an urban municipality.  The new 1000 acre downtown site is located along the banks of Rouge River a natural heritage site, and will be transit-based and pedestrian oriented, with buildings that are LEED Silver (or higher), with served by district energy.  It will be the largest sustainable community in Canada.

The downtown plan was started in the 1990’s and has changed significantly in the last two decades.  This session will describe the ‘how-to’ and ‘lesson learned’ aspects of work to date, focusing on how to maintain a long term vision through several market, economic and political cycles.  The process to date, and the evolving plans, will be discussed from the viewpoints of the architect, the developer and the municipality.

Learning Objective:

  1. Learn about how to create a sustainable high density, mixed use urban community
  2. Learn about how to protect a major natural heritage feature within a high density community
  3. Learn about intensification in a low rise, low density suburban municipality
  4. Learn about coordinating between several levels of government and associated agencies to create a new Downtown

Speakers:

Ronji Borooah is a Fellow of the Royal Architectural Institute of Canada and a member of the Ontario Association of Architects.  He is currently the City Architect and Head of Urban Design at the City of Markham.  He has been a speaker at the national conferences of the RAIC, OAA, CIP, OPPI and APA.  He is a member of the Ottawa Urban Design Review Panel, and was a jury member for the Toronto Urban Design Awards Program, the Ottawa Urban Design Awards, and the Public Art Program for the TTC/York Spadina Subway Extension.

Randy Peddigrew is the Senior Vice President of the Land Development Division of The Remington Group.  The Remington Group, under the guidance of its principle Rudy Bratty, has been developing land in the Great Toronto Area for over 60 years.  Remington is involved in the development and management of a vast portfolio of residential, commercial and industrial land in almost every community across the Greater Toronto Area. Remington is currently developing one of the, if not the largest, LEED developments in North America. The development is know as Downtown Markham and once completed will contain approximately 7000 residential dwelling units, 2,000,000 sq. ft. of retail space and 3,500,000 sq.ft. of office use. 

Sheldon Levitt studied architecture at the University of Toronto. He joined Quadrangle Architects  in 1987 and became a Principal in 1999. Sheldon specializes in the design of challenging, large residential and mix-used developments that elegantly fit within their urban context. His special interest in the promotion of environmentally responsible design and the urbanization  of brownfield and greenfield sites has led to his involvement with innovative projects.  Notable amongst these projects is The Toy Factory in Liberty Village Toronto, and the masterplan and over 12 buildings in Downtown Markham.  With Quadrangle, Sheldon’s projects have received numerous local and international awards, including the United Nations World Habitat Award. Sheldon is a fellow of the LEAD (Leadership for Environment and Development) programme, is a member of the Vaughan Design Review Panel and an alumnus of the National Round Table on the Environment and Economy.

2:00 PM - 5:30 PM

05CE

Minimizing Risk in Heritage Conservation Projects

3 ConEd learning hours

This session is being offered again Thursday, May 8, 2:00 PM –5:30 PM

Course Outline

The Canadian Association of Heritage Professionals (CAHP) strives for and promotes excellence in heritage conservation.  Members ‘ fields of heritage expertise include but are not limited to archaeology, engineering, architecture, conservation, crafts and contracting, environmental assessment, planning, historians, landscape architecture, museology,  material testing  and recording. 

The Workshop will begin by identifying specialized heritage trades and exploring how to find them. There will be an overview of the breath of roles heritage contractors and craftsmen can play in your conservation projects 

The intent of the workshop is for architects to learn about the unique contribution that contractors and craftsmen specializing in heritage conservation make to the preservation of our built environment and how their expertise can contribute to the architect’s success. The workshops will include case studies that describe a number of projects where difficulties that arose could have been alleviated by involving the heritage contractor and craftsman in either the planning stages or in risk avoidance when as-found conditions were not as anticipated in the contract documents. 

The workshop will end with ‘lessons learned’. Here you will learn how integrating the heritage contractor and tradesman as part of the team averts cost overruns, schedule delays and high risk contract implementation. 

Speakers:

Jane Burgess, OAA, CAHP, APTI
Partner Stevens Burgess Architects Inc.

Jane is a founding partner of Stevens Burgess Architects (SBA and has over thirty years’ experience in the heritage industry. She is presently on the CAHP Board. and  has served on the OAA Board and the Toronto Preservation Board. Jane has undertaken conservation projects for all three levels of government and is presently a Vendor of Record for heritage project for Infrastructure Ontario, the City of Toronto and the City of Hamilton. Jane’s experience in the conservation industry runs the entire gamut from formulating heritage policy to artifact conservation. High profile sites on which she has worked include, Dundurn Castle, Fort York Armoury, George Brown House, Old Stone Church, Old Don Jail, Old Fort York, Old Whitby Psychiatric Site, Sir James Whitney School, Ste. Marie Amongst the Huron, and the Whitney Block and Tower. SBA is the recipient of conservation awards from Heritage Toronto, Niagara-On-The-Lake, Building of Excellence, and CAHP.

David Edgar B.A (Hons.), HND Arch. Cons, ICON, SPAB, CAC
Foreman Site Carver for RJW GEM Campbell Inc

David is the Conservator & Foreman Site Carver responsible for the stonemasons for the restoration of the West Block, Parliament Hill, Ottawa.  David is a graduate of the renowned Weymouth College stone conservation programme and has worked as a conservator, carver and mason alongside other heritage professionals & conservation organisations (including English Heritage, the Churches Conservation Trust & The National Trust) to ensure the sympathetic maintenance and repair of Listed Buildings across England.

Completed projects include:  The Cathedrals of Salisbury, Winchester, Manchester & Sheffield; The Garrick Club, London; Central Library & Stanley Park, Liverpool; St Mary's Church, Thorton-Le-Moors; Brownsea Castle & Thomas Hardy's Cottage, Dorset and Cartmel Priory.  David has worked in Canada since mid-2012.

Philip V. Hoad, BA (Hons), CAHP
President, Empire Restoration Inc.
Principal, Applied Roof Technology Ltd.

Philip has worked on multiple National Historic Sites and major heritage building projects across Eastern Canada as a contractor, project manager and site supervisor for the past 20 years. He spent a significant time with Parks Canada and has held a number of other key positions in both the institutional and public sectors, most recently as, Manager of Heritage Facilities & Capital Planning at the City of Hamilton.

He has presented seminars and served on professional committees and advisory boards for Construct Canada, APTI and ASTM and was responsible for modifications to the Canadian National Master Specifications for Slate Roofing. He is a Faculty Associate at Willowbank School of Restoration Arts in Queenston and is currently serving his second term as an Executive Director of the Canadian Association of Heritage Professionals. He is also the Canadian representative for Shaws of Darwen, a UK architectural terra cotta and faience manufacturer.

Don Hutchinson, GSC, CAHP
President of J. D. Strachan Construction Limited

Don started his career as an apprentice carpenter in 1974 with Fairwin Construction Limited where he worked for 10 years.  Working on projects such as #1 Kings College Circle at U of T, Canada’s Wonderland, Jack Diamond’s Office on the Esplanade and Kortright Centre  for Conservation.  He gradually worked his way up from Apprentice Carpenter to Superintendent, Project Coordinator and now Owner and President of J. D. Strachan Construction Limited.  Don has been involved with projects such as Osgoode Hall, over 50 projects for U of T, over 50 projects at Queens Park, Fort York, George Brown House, the Law Society of Upper Canada and  as Construction Managers of St. Paul’s Bloor Anglican Church in Toronto.  Don is a member of Ontario General Contractors Association, Toronto Construction Association, APT, ACO, CAHP and Don has his Gold Seal Certificate in Construction Management.  After 40 years Don is familiar with most of the Heritage Architects in Toronto and surrounding areas.

 

 

2:00 PM - 5:30 PM

06CE

Preserving McGill University’s Downtown Campus

3 ConEd Learning Hours

This session will be offered again Thursday, May 08, 2014 8:30 AM - 12:00 PM

Course Outline

The presentation will give participants the opportunity to view, first hand, the McGill University campus and its magnificent buildings (1835 to 1925) via a guided tour.  A lecture will follow presenting the findings of an exhaustive analysis which was conducted by FGMDA in 1996 based on numerous diagnostics and investigation techniques. We will look at the problems encountered, repair strategies which were considered and later implemented, as well as lessons learned from this in-depth investigation, many of which can be applied to any campus buildings, including future McGill campaigns.  Specific topics will include overall building envelope performance, restoration of slated and copper roofs, traditional wood windows and stone masonry.  

The tour and the lecture will be conducted by conservation architects Matteo Cendamo and Giovanni Dioadati, both of whom have been involved in the rehabilitation of McGill campus buildings since the beginning in 1997.

NOTE The McGill University campus is a 10-minute walk from the hotel where the OAA Annual Conference will take place.  No special equipment is required for touring the McGill campuses, although good walking shoes and weather appropriate clothing are recommended.  The walking tour will take one and a half hour, followed by a one and a half hour lecture, including a questions and answer period at the end, a total of three hours.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Understand the historic evolution of the Campus, of its different buildings types and of the related envelope problem
  2. Understand the design / decision making philosophy employed - based on the Standards and Guidelines for Conserving Historic Places in Canada
  3. Review diagnostic and investigation techniques used in the projects
  4. Review the conservation strategies employed to rehabilitate historic building envelope components with Slate and metal roofing, Stone masonry and Wood windows

Speaker

MATTEO CENDAMO, OAQ
Senior Architect and Associate of Fournier Gersovitz Moss Drolet et associés architectes

Matteo Cendamo is a graduate of McGill University where he earned a Bachelor of Science (Physics) in 1982 and a Bachelor of architecture in 1987. He has been with FGMDA since 1998 and was appointed one of its associates in 2009. He brings 27 years of experience to all projects on which he collaborates. 

Matteo began his career working on large buildings in Montreal, such as the Molson Centre (now the Bell Centre) and Canada Place. He has since then developed an expertise in the management of heritage conservation projects in urban settings. His dual training in architecture and physical sciences enables him to approach building materials in terms of their properties, dynamic action within the building envelope and against the conditions to which they are subjected. As a Project Architect, he works closely with Project Managers in the planning and implementation of projects, from risk analysis to costing, surveys and drawing specifications, scheduling, quality assurance/control and reporting, developing technical solutions wherever needed.

GIOVANNI (JOHN) DIODATI, Sr. Architect – Sr. Associate
OAA, OAQ, RAIC, FAPT, CAHP
Bachelor of Architecture, McGill University, 1990

Giovanni Diodati earned a bachelor of architecture from McGill University in 1990. With over 23 years of professional experience, Mr. Diodati plays a key role at Fournier Gersovitz Moss Drolet et associés architectes (FGMDA) as a specialist in materials conservation issues and in traditional construction techniques. He is in charge of building envelope restoration, restoration and rehabilitation projects with the firm, overseeing a group of specialised architects and participating in all project phases from the initial diagnosis to completion and in some cases, the long-term building monitoring and maintenance programs. He has been an associate with FGMDA since 1999.

ROBERT STANLEY, Director, Project Management, Facilities Operations and Development, McGill University

Robert Stanley obtained his Bachelor of Architecture from McGill University in 1973 and has been a member of l’Ordre des architectes du Québec since 1976. Upon obtaining his certification he cofounded and ran a building conservation architectural practice until 1991 at which time he joined McGill University’s project management team as a senior project manager. In 2007 he was appointed Director of Project Management of the Facilities Operations and Development, University Services. He leads a team of 34 dedicated staff members that manage over 9 million square feet of Canada’s most significant and historically important buildings.

2:00 PM - 3:30 PM

07CE

Building Biology- 7 Keys to Health and Resilience

1.5 ConEd Learning Hours

This session is being offered again Thursday, May 8, 8:30 AM – 10:00 AM

Course Outline

Our Heritage Buildings exist because they are resilient. There is a direct correlation between the resiliency of a building, its longevity, the health and well-being of its occupants, and long-term ecological performance. Has the “belt and suspenders” approach of current green building, mistaken redundancy for resiliency? This session examines the alternatives.

When the "Working Group on Healthy Building and Living" (1969 Translated from German) formed a multidisciplinary group to probe what made people healthy in the built environment they discovered seven factors inherent in pre-petrochemical buildings.  These factors were lacking in the Post WWII buildings that were causing ill-health. This formed much of the basis of what we now call Building Biology, a science that studies the health of occupants within buildings.

My experience as an architect in creating healthy environments for the well and the chemically sensitive has lead me to work with a variety of alternatives to conventional stick frame construction that follow the principles of Building Biology.

This lecture will explore the seven factors for resilient buildings that support health, ecology and building longevity and provide examples of alternatives to conventional construction.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Learn about the Building Biology approach to human health, building longevity and ecology
  2. Explore the essential paradigmatic differences between Building Biology and Green Building
  3. Learn about the seven common denominators found in pre-petrochemical era buildings which promote building longevity and the health and well-being of occupants.
  4. Learn how these seven factors can be applied to contemporary buildings through case-studies examples

Speaker:

Paula Baker-Laporte FAIA graduated from the University of Toronto, School of Architecture in 1978 and from The International Institute of Bau-Biologie and Ecology in 1995. In 2007, she was honored with investiture into the College of Fellows of the American Institute of Architects. She headed her award-winning architectural practice based in Santa Fe, New Mexico from 1986-2009  She is currently the president of EcoNest Architecture Inc. based in Ashland Oregon. Since 1992, Paula has dedicated her practice to the precepts of environmentally sound and health enhancing architecture. She was selected as one of our nation’s top 10 green architects by Natural Home Magazine July/August 2005 edition. She has developed a unique specialty in alternative construction for health and is a practicing architect as well as a consultant on the health aspects of building throughout North America, and in Central America, Switzerland, Singapore and Israel. 

Paula has lectured, taught, and published extensively on the topic of healthy and ecological design. She is currently developing and teaching courses for the International Institute of Bau-biologie and Ecology along with her teaching partner Stephen Collette. She is the primary author of Prescriptions for a Healthy House, 1st,-3rd edition, New Society Publishers1998- 2008 and co-author with husband Robert Laporte, of EcoNest: Creating Sustainable Sanctuaries of Clay, Straw and Timber, published by Gibbs Smith, 2005.  Her new book on Light Straw Clay construction is scheduled to be published in 2014. She is a contributing author to several other books and periodicals.

2:00 PM - 3:30 PM

08CE

Building Code History and Alternative Solutions

1.5 ConEd Learning hours

This course is being offered again Wednesday, May 7, 2014 4:00 PM - 5:30 PM

This presentation discusses the historical basis of building code requirements present in today’s building codes. Understanding the technical basis of specific building code requirements allows a designer to develop alternative solutions to address the specific concern that lead to the introduction of a code requirement. The historical basis behind the code requirement can be used in support of alternative solution applications. 

This session will include examining the basis behind building height and area limitations relative to construction type, travel distance and other code requirements. Examples of using the historical basis behind a building code requirement in support of an alternative solution application will be discussed.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Why was the building code requirement introduced,
  2. What was the concern at the time of introduction (was there a problem prevalent in the construction industry at the time),
  3. Is the original basis of the requirement valid in modern construction practices, and
  4. The building code has evolved with each cycle and may now have other features that mitigate the risk behind the original basis of the code requirement.

Speaker:

Keith Calder, M.Eng. P.Eng
Founding Principal
 
Keith Calder
 provides leadership with his expertise in building codes, fire safety standards, specialized fire protection systems, and performance-based design. He focuses on assisting clients with alternative solutions for complex and innovative designs. In particular, he specializes in the use of computer fire modelling to assess new construction design with regard to smoke control and people movement. He has led our computer modelling team on our most significant transportation projects, including the Canada Line project in Vancouver, LRT and Airport expansion projects in Calgary, and Sentosa Tunnel and International Cruise Ship Terminal projects in Singapore.

Mr. Calder has developed a vast knowledge of the application of current and historical building codes, which assists with conducting complicated design audits, specifically, where the design and construction of a facility or group of integrated structures spans several decades and editions of the applicable codes.

Complementing his design expertise, Keith has a wide background in forensic fire investigation. He has investigated and analyzed many fire and explosion incidents, and has conducted forensic audits of building design and construction. An active researcher, he continues to coordinate and assist with our ongoing live burn research program.

2:00 PM - 3:30 PM

09CE

Snow & Ice Formation Patterns & Energy Efficient Facade

1.5 ConEd Learning Hours

Course Outline

This presentation will review interconnections between snow and ice formation patterns on facades and energy efficient façade details. There is a growing awareness in the design and construction industry that the thermal performance of building envelope / façade details can be dramatically lower than previously assumed.  Consequently, in some instances, poor thermally performing details are being replaced with improved, more energy efficient details sometimes combined with high performance glazing systems and building HVAC strategies.  Improved thermal performance for our new and retrofitted buildings is certainly a necessity, but can have unexpected consequences for snow and ice formation on building exteriors that need to be considered.

In cold climates, poor thermally performing envelope details readily transfer heat from the interior conditioned space to the exterior surfaces of the building envelope, resulting in exterior surface temperatures that can reduce the formation of ice and snow on a building surface.  With the adoption of improved energy efficient assemblies and HVAC strategies, heat transfer is reduced to varying degrees to improve the building energy performance.  The hypothesis is that the resulting change in localized exterior surface temperatures is altering the anticipated ice and snow formation and transformation patterns on buildings in cold climates.  Interesting situations are emerging where the reduced heat transfer is permitting snow and ice to form and accumulate in areas where traditionally, there was enough heat loss to prevent this from happening. This session will compare a sampling of building specific ice and snow formation on existing high rise buildings in North America with predicted heat transfer for traditional and higher performance building envelopes. 

Overall heat transfer through envelope assemblies, as well as through specific building envelope details will be considered.  Examples of envelope assemblies that are at risk for increased ice and snow formation due to reduced heat transfer will be presented.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Review the basic parameters of snow and ice formation on buildings
  2. Understanding the thermal performance of curtain wall spandrel and glass areas and potential implication for snow and ice formation by increasing energy efficiency
  3. Review case study of specific snow and ice fall event data as it relates to thermal performance of glazing system
  4. Review of key parameters where risk of snow and ice formation due to increased energy efficiency in details is highest and the pitfalls to avoid

Speakers:

Peter Adams, P.Eng., is a Principal of Morrison Hershfield Limited and a Senior Building Envelope Engineer based in the firm’s Toronto office. A graduate of mechanical engineering from Memorial University of Newfoundland, Peter began his building science career over twenty years ago at the National Research Council in Ottawa.  He has since investigated and devised repairs for hundreds of buildings experiencing envelope failure and indoor air quality problems throughout North America, and provides building envelope design assistance for retrofit and new construction.  Peter is Past President of the Ontario Building Envelope Council, participates in several industry organizations, and is currently Vice Chair of ASHRAE Technical Committee 4.4 on Building Envelopes and Materials.

4:00 PM - 5:30 PM

10CE

Building Code History and Alternative Solutions

1.5 ConEd Learning hours

This course is being offered again on Wednesday, May 7, 2014 2:00 PM - 3:30 PM

Course Outline

This presentation discusses the historical basis of building code requirements present in today’s building codes. Understanding the technical basis of specific building code requirements allows a designer to develop alternative solutions to address the specific concern that lead to the introduction of a code requirement. The historical basis behind the code requirement can be used in support of alternative solution applications. 

This session will include examining the basis behind building height and area limitations relative to construction type, travel distance and other code requirements. Examples of using the historical basis behind a building code requirement in support of an alternative solution application will be discussed.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Why was the building code requirement introduced,
  2. What was the concern at the time of introduction (was there a problem prevalent in the construction industry at the time),
  3. Is the original basis of the requirement valid in modern construction practices, and
  4. The building code has evolved with each cycle and may now have other features that mitigate the risk behind the original basis of the code requirement.

Speaker:

Keith Calder, M.Eng. P.Eng
Founding Principal
 
Keith Calder
 provides leadership with his expertise in building codes, fire safety standards, specialized fire protection systems, and performance-based design. He focuses on assisting clients with alternative solutions for complex and innovative designs. In particular, he specializes in the use of computer fire modelling to assess new construction design with regard to smoke control and people movement. He has led our computer modelling team on our most significant transportation projects, including the Canada Line project in Vancouver, LRT and Airport expansion projects in Calgary, and Sentosa Tunnel and International Cruise Ship Terminal projects in Singapore.

Mr. Calder has developed a vast knowledge of the application of current and historical building codes, which assists with conducting complicated design audits, specifically, where the design and construction of a facility or group of integrated structures spans several decades and editions of the applicable codes.

Complementing his design expertise, Keith has a wide background in forensic fire investigation. He has investigated and analyzed many fire and explosion incidents, and has conducted forensic audits of building design and construction. An active researcher, he continues to coordinate and assist with our ongoing live burn research program.

4:00 PM - 5:30 PM

11CE

Protecting Heritage Elements during Demo/Construction

1.5 ConEd Learning Hours

This course will be offered again Thursday, May 8, 2014, 10:30 AM -12:00 PM and Thursday, May 8, 2014, 4:00 PM - 5:30 PM 

Course Outline

Case study of measures undertaken to identify the risks to heritage building elements and provide appropriate protection procedures during major demolition and rehabilitation efforts at 180 Wellington, Ottawa.

  • Description of the overall abatement, demolition and seismic reinforcement scope
  • Description of heritage-defining components of the building
  • Discussion of various heritage materials, their defining characteristics and their vulnerabilities.
  • Discussion of particular challenges related to fine arts conservation
  • Establishing and implementing protective measures and procedures for architectural bronze and steel items, exterior stone cladding, interior marble finishes and ornamental glass tile ceiling mosaics
  • Monitoring and adapting demolition and construction methods while work is ongoing.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Identifying risks to heritage building elements during a major demolition/rehabilitation project.
  2. Establishing the appropriate measures to mitigate the risks for each material and configuration.
  3. Understanding the challenges in documenting and implementing protective measures
  4. Establishing protocols for monitoring, maintaining, and adapting heritage protection materials and procedures during demolition/construction activities

Speaker:

Eric Stein, OAQ, APT Senior Associate

Eric Stein received his Bachelor of Architecture from McGill University in Montreal. He joined FGMDA in 2001 and was appointed one of its associates in 2009. He has over 22 years of experience in his field. 

Mr. Stein has worked as Project Architect on medium to large scale commercial and institutional projects, many of which are heritage conservation projects. He is well-versed in conceptual work and in all areas of project management, including costing, scheduling, quality assurance/control and contract administration. He is also proficient in the integration and automation of the production of computerized drawings. 

Heritage conservation projects have included rehabilitation of the Wellington building in Ottawa and of the St. Thomas Consolidated Courthouse in  Ontario; restoration and interior design of Montreal’s FACE school auditorium; restoration of the Mappin Wing façade at Rideau Hall in Ottawa; elaboration of protective scaffolding measures in view of important restoration works on Parliament Hill’s West Block in Ottawa; masonry and roof restoration of the Beaconsfield Yacht Club; and restoration of the façade of the Montreal Herald.

Mr. Stein has also collaborated in the design of the Dorshei Emet Congregation Synagogue in Hampstead, Quebec, and of two private residences in the Quebec Laurentians; as well as in the roof restoration of Le Château Apartments in downtown Montreal.

4:00 PM - 5:30 PM

12CE

Social Media or Prospecting Using the Internet

1.5 ConEd Learning hours

This course will also be offered on Thursday, May 8, 2014 2:00 PM - 3:30 PM 

Course Outline 

Does your firm have a website? If so, what part does it play in your marketing efforts? Does your firm have a strategy to leverage the internet and social media tools to further your marketing and prospecting goals?

If you are like most architects in the real world, you feel overwhelmed when thinking about social media. Who has time to run an architectural practice, update and follow people on Twitter, and post to a Facebook page, in addition to face-to-face networking? The answer is few, if any. 

Fortunately, you don't need to be a social media maven to have real success. This presentation goes beyond social media, and focuses on a marketing framework that brings real, measurable results: attract more of the right kind of clients, get your firm recognition for the work it does, and nurture industry contacts. Focus on the avenues that bring results; forget the rest.

We'll look at two case studies of architecture firms that have leveraged the internet to get more of the right clients, and become recognized as subject matter experts. You will learn about the “internet marketing framework” and how this can compliment your existing marketing efforts. Finally, we will discuss ways that you can tailor this framework and apply it to your unique practice to help you achieve your marketing goals.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Understand the advantages and limitations of social media for architecture firms.
  2. Learn the elements of a successful architect's website.
  3. Learn how to define a clear set of marketing goals.
  4. Know how the internet can help you get more of the right clients with less effort.

Speakers:

Enoch Sears writes about marketing a small architecture firm and running a profitable architecture practice on his popular blog, BusinessofArchitecture. For the past 5 years he has studied how architecture firms can leverage internet tools such as social media to build a marketing platform that attracts the right kind of clients. Frequent topics on BusinessofArchitecture.com, include BIM tools, the architect's website, marketing for architects, and the practice archetype of architect as developer. He is the author of the book, Social Media for Architects.

In addition to BusinessofArchitecture.com, Enoch practices architecture in California as a licensed architect. He graduated from the College of Architecture, Art and Planning at Cornell University with a degree in architecture.

4:00 PM - 5:30 PM

13CE-

The Architects as Social Developers of Heritage Sites

1.5 ConEd Learning Hours

This course will also be offered Friday, May 9, 2014 4:00 PM – 5:30 PM

Course Outline

Architects have a fundamental role to play in order to realize the social potential of vacant or derelict historic landmarks. Through the presentation of several case studies we will posit that 'recycled' heritage architecture can be a catalyst for community renewal.

Various approaches will be proposed for evaluating the potential of heritage architecture, including urban studies at various scales, architectural and historical census of a site, and financial feasibility studies. An analysis of the gathered information will determine essential conservation elements and appropriate development opportunities.

Obstacles to heritage projects will be addressed, including regulatory, financial and emotional hurdles. Community consultation and an ongoing dialogue with local organizations are employed as a means to build momentum and create consensus around projects, as well as a tool to identify opportunity sites.

Heritage architecture historically acted as a physical cornerstone of a community -an anchor of public space and a symbol of neighbourhood identity. Architects have the skills to harness community initiative and transform disused historic landmarks into new social reincarnations, allowing heritage architecture to reclaim its role as primary actor in the urban and cultural context.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Evaluating the past, existing and future role(s) played by a heritage site in the urban, architectural and community fabric.
  2. Navigating the regulatory, financial, social and emotional constraints to proposed heritage projects.
  3. Harnessing momentum and building community consensus to realize projects.
  4. Designing heritage architecture

Speakers

Ron Rayside, MOAQ, is the founding partner of Rayside Labossière Inc., an architecture firm specialized in social architecture and urban planning.

An active participant of Montreal community groups since the 1970s, Ron's involvement has ranged from member of various coalitions and steering committees, to president of the board of directors of the Centre-Sud Corporation for Community Economic Development (CDEC), and the Health and Social Services Centre Jeanne-Mance (CSSS). He is a mainstay at Montreal conferences and forums on homelessness and social exclusion, the future of churches in Quebec, and the development of neighbourhoods and "popular" urbanism.

Ron's social involvement informs the philosophy of his architectural practice, and his firm frequently accompanies community groups from the initial phases of project development. Through the preparation of preliminary sketches, economic feasibility studies, or full architectural services from inception to completion of building, Rayside Labossière Inc. facilitates and assists organizations', residents' and businesses' involvement in the urban and architectural projects that shape their communities.

Beyond his role as an architect, Ron is an engaged citizen who actively contributes to the development and revitalization of his surroundings. In 2013 he was awarded the Thérèse-Daviau prize in recognition of his outstanding contribution to the Montreal community.

2:00 PM - 4:30 PM

01T

Château Ramezay

2.5 Unstructured Learning Hours

The Château Ramezay has been presenting historical exhibitions and organizing cultural, scientific and museological activities for more than 115 years. Its mission is to preserve, highlight and provide access to a building, which is classified as an historical monument, and a collection mainly focused on the history of Montréal and Québec. To do so, it implements educational activities and hosts events closely connected with Montréal’s cultural life.

From 1997-2010, through a Montréal cultural development agreement between the City of Montréal and the Québec Ministry of Culture and Communications, the Château underwent an extensive interior and exterior restoration. In June 2000, its landscaping was redeveloped in order to create the Governor’s Garden. This garden is a typical example of an 18th century urban garden in New France. In addition to its garden, the Château Ramezay presents its collections through a variety of permanent and temporary exhibitions, which reveal the culture, heritage and daily life of Québec’s inhabitants over the centuries.

The guided tour will focus on the architecture of the Château Ramezay. The basis of it will be the regular touristic guided tour about the history of Montréal from the 17 to the 20th Century. The tour will take you through the Governor’s Garden and Chateau Ramezay’s temporary and permanent exhibitions. 

2:00 PM - 4:00 PM

02T

Dorchester Square

2 Unstructured Learning Hours

A great urban room, the square is layered with buildings that mark its evolution from residential square to gateway with the construction of Windsor Station in 1889 to the heart of a ‘new downtown’ when Sun Life moved up from Old Montreal in 1914. The two churches – Mary Queen of the World and St. George’s – stand in contrast to the 1960s CIBC and Chateau Champlain; major monuments sit on the recently restored and revitalized green space and the public function of the square is as significant now it was in the 19th century.

This is an architectural walking tour, presented rain or shine. The tour will be offered in English by Heritage Montreal  volunteer guides, who have backgrounds in architecture, art history, architectural education or urban planning.

 

 

2:00 PM - 5:00 PM

03T

Parc du Mont-Royal

3 Unstructured Learning Hours

This guided walking tour will loop winds through the forest to reach Mount Royal's summit to discover its flora and fauna. Spectacular views allows a unique look on the city and its history (3.5 km).

6:00 PM - 8:00 PM

Annual General Meeting

All OAA members are invited to attend the Annual General Meeting. Only OAA licensed architects are permitted to vote.

 

8:30 PM - 12:00 AM

Opening Reception













You won‘t want to miss this year's opening reception at Le Parquette.
Located at the heart of the Quartier international de Montréal, steps from the city's business core, the Parquet is an immense glass-walled atrium that crosses over St. Alexandre Street to horizontally connect the city blocks between Square-Victoria, The Parquet also opens onto two outdoor terraces, yet another feature setting it apart from other Montréal event locations. Enjoy the tastes offered at the plentiful food stations throughout the reception. And don‘t forget to drop by our special sponsored lounge areas for a cocktail or two. Plan to get together with colleagues and friends to kick-off the Conference.

11:30 AM - 1:00 PM

WoodWORKS! - Excellence and Inspiration in Wood

This event is sold out.

11:30 AM - 1:00 PM

Hanson Brick - Manufacture/Specification of Brick Masonry, CSA/ASTM Updates

11:30 AM - 1:00 PM

Unilock - Architectural Natural Stone & Precast Concrete Paving

An information session on Unilock's ethically sourced architectural Natural Stone, available as both pavement and masonry wall application materials. We will also discuss the well proven architectural dry cast and wet cast concrete, large format slabs used in highly acclaimed architectural projects. Details on specifications, costing and project references will also be included.

11:30 AM - 1:00 PM

Inline Fiberglass - Fiberglass windows to conserve energy demand in SB10 & SB12

11:30 AM - 1:00 PM

Prelco Inc. - Innovative glass

This event is sold out.

11:30 AM - 1:00 PM

Mumby Insurance Brokers - Without a plan it won’t get built!