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OAA Annual Conference 2014

Thursday May 08 2014 - FAIRMONT THE QUEEN ELIZABETH, MONTREAL

OAA Conference 2012

Conference Program



Thursday May 08 2014

Registration: 7:30 AM to 7:00 PM
Continental Breakfast: 7:30 AM - 9:00 AM
Refreshment Breaks: Morning 10:00 AM - 10:30 AM,
Afternoon 3:30 PM - 4:00 PM
Sponsor Displays: 8:00 AM - 5:00 PM
8:30 AM - 12:00 PM

04AC

The Building Code Act and the Building Permit Application Process

3 ConEd learning hours

Presenter

Mike Seiling, C.E.T., C.B.C.O., Chief Building Official, City of Kitchener.

Course Outline

This course provides an overview of the planning and land development approvals process in Ontario. This includes the roles architects, other professionals and authorities having jurisdiction play in that process. The lecture will describe the various planning tools that implement planning legislation and provide a guide to understanding and navigating the complex development approvals process.

Course Objectives

At the end of this session you will be able to:

  • Explain why the land use planning and development process is relevant to architects.
  • Identify the ways the province and municipalities plan for growth.
  • Identify the authorities that have decision-making powers within the planning process.
  • List, describe, and compare the planning instruments that control land development in Ontario.
  • Describe the circumstances under which planning instruments constitute applicable law.
  • Explain how the various planning instruments are amended.
  • Outline the criteria used to evaluate planning applications.
  • Identify issues that can affect the approval process and how to address them.
  • Describe the architect’s role in the planning and development approval process.
  • Describe the planning powers of municipalities to control the exterior design of buildings.
  • Describe the role of the architect as an expert witness before the Ontario Municipal Board.
  • Describe what the Ontario Municipal Board takes into consideration in making planning decisions.
  • Describe the planning powers of municipalities to control the exterior design of buildings.

2:00 PM - 5:30 PM

05AC

Construction Lien Act

3 ConEd learning hours

Presenter

Glenn Ackerley, WeirFoulds LLP, Barristers & Solicitors.

Part 1 – Construction Lien Act

This part looks at the Construction Lien Act and outlines the purpose of the legislation, how lien legislation relates to the architect’s responsibilities, costs, claims and the lien rights of architects.   

Part 2 – Implications for Architectural Practices

This part looks at the practical implications of the Construction Lien Act related to the normal administration and payment certification of standard construction contracts.  

Course Objectives 

At the end of this session you will be able to:

  • To prepare a diagram of the traditional ‘construction pyramid’;
  • To describe who is eligible to benefit from the Construction Lien Act;
  • To identify when, and how, to issue a certificate of substantial performance and a statement of completion;
  • To explain when the lien period commences and expires for contractors and sub-contractors;
  • To outline the process of registering a lien;
  • To differentiate the following procedures:

    Notice of Lien
    Preservation of a Lien
    Perfection of a Lien

     And describe the consequences of each.

  • To explain at least five actions that might be taken when a lien is claimed;
  • To describe how the certification of substantial performance relates to the warranty period in a CCDC contract;
  • To describe how the lien rights of an architect differ as an architect engaged as a prime consultant by the client and as a sub-consultant to the prime consultant;
  • To understand the various office processes of an architectural practice that are required of the payment certifier on a construction contract related to the Construction Lien Act.

8:30 AM - 12:00 PM

14CE

Delivering Commercial Passivhaus Projects

3 ConEd learning hours

This session is being offered again Wednesday, May 7, 2:00 PM –5:30 PM and Friday, May 9, 2014 8:30 AM - 12:00 PM 

Course Outline

The opportunity to create commercial Passivhaus projects in the North America is wide open. Unfortunately, there is little information available to the designer to guide them in the design and implementation of commercial Passivhaus design.  Also, much of what is available is written to European standards which differ in some significant ways from North American design standards.

This presentation will detail the basics of commercial Passivhaus design, the potential challenges that must be overcome and inherent opportunities to create exceptional projects. Recent built examples of the first North American Passivhaus projects will also be presented.

Learning Objectives

  1. Describe the basics of Passivhaus means and methods
  2. Describe the differences between residential and commercial Passivhaus
  3. Describe the three categories of Passivhaus buildings and their specific application
  4. Describe potential synergies available to the designer in high performance buildings

Speaker:

Adam Cohen
As an active design/builder and green building expert, Adam Cohen is a leading North American Passivhaus practitioner whose innovative work on commercial high performance building has made his expertise sought-after for projects across North America. He is a principal partner in Structures Design/Build, LLC (www.structuresdb.com), Passiv Structures, LLC (www.passivscience.com) and Quantum Architects, LLC, (www.quantum-architects.com). 

Mr. Cohen is recognized as a national leader in the Passivhaus movement and has presented technical papers at both national and international Passivhaus conferences. His leadership in commercial Passivhaus design has made him a sought after speaker, consultant and teacher of advanced courses in Passivhaus ultra-low energy design.

8:30 AM - 12:00 PM

15CE

AODA Public Spaces Standards: What You Need to Know

3 ConEd learning hours

This session is being offered again Wednesday, May 7, 2:00 PM – 5:30 PM

Course Outline

This session will outline the application requirements and technical details of the Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act's, Design of Public Spaces Standards. These standards came into effect in early 2013, defining mandatory accessibility requirements for the design of public spaces in Ontario, such as sidewalks and pathways, recreational trails, playgrounds, outdoor public eating areas, and public parking facilities. This session will introduce the Design of Public Spaces Standards and, through interactive group activities, provide participants with an opportunity to explore the application of the standards to real projects.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Understand the legal obligation for architectural projects to comply with the AODA Design of Public Spaces Standards
  2. Understand the application criteria and technical requirements of the AODA Design of Public Spaces Standards
  3. Understand the jurisdictional relationships between the accessibility requirements of the AODA Design of Public Spaces Standards, Ontario Building Code and Municipal Bylaws
  4. Understand the jurisdictional relationships between the accessibility requirements of the AODA Design of Public Spaces Standards, Ontario Building Code and Municipal Bylaws

Presenter:

Bob Topping is an architect and accessibility consultant; a member of the Ontario Association of Architects and the Royal Architectural Institute of Canada. Bob earned a Bachelor of Architecture (1979) from Strathclyde University, Glasgow, Scotland. He is the president of DesignABLE Environments Inc., and a founding member of the Global Alliance on Accessible Technologies and Environments (GAATES). Bob has over twenty-five years of experience practising and teaching architecture with a specialization and interest in the fields of barrier-free design and universal design. In his role as an accessibility consultant, Bob has assisted design teams realize the benefits of universal design and accessibility on projects within the justice, institutional, commercial, education, health care and entertainment sectors. Bob has presented workshops and participated in conferences around the world, educating design professionals on universal design of the built environment.

8:30 AM - 12:00 PM

16CE

Manitoba Hydro Place: Lesson Learned

3 ConEd learning hours

This session is also offered on Thursday, May 8, 2014 2:00 PM - 5:30 PM

Course Outline

Manitoba Hydro Place, designed and delivered through a formal IDP, offers a new way to think, design and deliver climate-responsive, resilient architecture in the 21st century. Three years after opening, it has surpassed all of its original objectives inclusive of LEED Platinum (originally Gold) and 60% energy savings (current 65%). Key is the climate responsive design developed through the IDP which shifted the challenge of the city’s extreme climate into an opportunity for optimizing passive energy. Representatives from the core IDP behind the innovative, paradigm-shifting design solution including the client, the architect, and climate engineer will deliver an intensive case study on the IDP process. They will also demonstrate how the project offers an expanded the concept of sustainable, environmentally responsible design which prioritizes city building and architectural excellence in the interest of improving the human experience.  

Learning Objectives

  1. To understand the IDP is first and foremost about creating healthy, supportive environments that prioritize the human experience and the individual.
  2. To demonstrate the value of IDP for synthesizing the complexities of making architecture in today’s climate of rapid change related to climate, technology, demographics and the economy while setting a clear path toward sustainability and innovation
  3. To position IDP as a tool for whole systems thinking to achieve design excellence, risk mitigation, operational efficiency, and value creation (social, economic, environmental).
  4. To affirm that the IDP enables architecture to be both poetic and didactic:  one building can make a meaningful difference and it is our collective responsibility - as clients, architects and specialists - to visualize and realize buildings that contribute to making a better world.

Speakers:

THE CLIENT

Tom Akerstream  B.E.S., B. Arch., M. Arch.

Tom has worked in the field of energy management and sustainability for over 30 years and was the Energy and Sustainability Advisor on Manitoba Hydro’s design team for the corporation’s new Headquarters, Manitoba Hydro Place. Tom has held numerous Board positions including past President of the Manitoba Electric League, founding Director of the Canada Green Building Council, Chairman Power Smart National Research and Development Board and has received numerous awards, most recently the  “Award of Merit” by CSA for his work in energy efficiency and sustainability, the “2012 Green Champion Award” by the Manitoba Chapter of the Canada Green Building Council and the Certificate of Recognition for Energy Efficiency and Renewables - Canadian Standards Association (CSA).  

Mark Pauls, P.Eng., M.Sc.

Mark is the Building Energy Management Engineer for Manitoba Hydro. He was responsible for implementing a Measurement and Verification Plan and optimizing the systems at Manitoba Hydro Place for maximum comfort and energy efficiency. Mark currently oversees the design and construction of new facilities at Manitoba Hydro. He has a Master of Science in Climate Engineering from Danube University Krems in Austria.

THE ARCHITECT

Bruce Kuwabara, OC, RAIC, RIBA, OAA

Bruce Kuwabara is a founding partner of KPMB Architects, an Officer of the Order of Canada and recipient of the RAIC Gold Medal. He has contributed to Canadian architecture with such projects as the ground breaking LEED Platinum Manitoba Hydro Place in Winnipeg, Le Quartier Concordia for Concordia University in Montreal, Canada’s National Ballet School in Toronto and the Canadian Museum of Nature in Ottawa.  He is currently the design architect for projects at Princeton University, Northwestern University, Boston University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the Toronto 2015 Pan/Parapan American Games Athletes’ Village. He is the first Chair of Waterfront Toronto Design Review Panel and was recently appointed as the new Chair of the Canadian Centre for Architecture (CCA) in Montreal. 

THE CLIMATE ENGINEER

Thomas Auer – Managing Director & Partner 

Thomas is partner and managing director of Transsolar, an engineering firm with offices in Stuttgart, Munich, Paris and New York. He collaborated with world known architecture firms on numerous international design projects. He is a specialist in energy efficiency, user comfort and sustainable urban design. Thomas has developed concepts for buildings around the world noted for their innovative strategies – an integral part of signature architecture. Thomas taught at Yale University and was a visiting professor at the ESA in Paris and other Universities. He speaks frequently at conferences and received the Treehugger “best of green” award in 2010.

8:30 AM - 12:00 PM

17CE

OBC – 2012 Part 3

This Session is sold out

3 ConEd Learning hours 

This course will also be offered on Friday, May 09, 2014 2:00 PM - 5:30 PM

Course Outline

In this course, you will be introduced to changes included in the 2012 Ontario Building Code as they relate to Part 3 buildings.  This will include relevant material from Divisions A and C, as well as Division B, Parts 1, 3, 5, 11 and 12, with particular emphasis given to substantive changes to the building code as well as related items such as fire alarm and exit lighting of specific relevance to architects. The course will not cover myriad typographic or grammatical changes where the code intent remains the same. 

Learning Objectives:

  1. To provide a basic awareness of the scope of changes incorporated within the 2012 Ontario Building Code.
  2. To provide a more thorough understanding of the most significant changes to requirements for buildings within the scope of Part 3 of the 2012 Ontario Building Code

Speaker:

Liz Hilfrich is both a Professional Engineer and a Certified Building Code Official, with over 30 years of Building Code experience, including more than 20 years as a municipal Building Official, including 16 years as Chief Building Official for the City of Gloucester, and over 25 years as a facilitator of Ministry of Municipal Affairs and Housing Building Code and Act courses. Having qualifications in all design categories specified by the Building Code, Liz currently runs her own Building Code Consulting business, Hilfrich Inc., providing Code interpretation, analysis and review services to both private and public sector clients. In addition, she has been a member of Ontario’s Building Materials Evaluation Commission since 2004, and a part time teacher at Algonquin College facilitating building code courses since 2006.  Other related activities over the years have included membership on Algonquin College’s Fire protection and Safety Technician Program Advisory Committees and the Working Group to Establish the Home Inspection Certificate Program, and involvement on the executive and two conference host committees of the Golden Triangle Chapter for the Ontario Building Official’s Association.

8:30 AM - 12:00 PM

18CE

Beyond Design: Turning a Place Around

3 ConEd Learning hours

This course will be offered again on Friday, May 9, 2014 8:30 AM - 12:00 PM

Course Outline

Revitalizing public places is a perennial challenge. We have all seen examples of grand revitalization schemes which focused on the latest design trends, and a generation later, the community needs a new strategy in order to “turn a place around”. The social and economic fabrics are fragile, woven over time into the unique character of each community. We must look beyond the architecture and design features to support the people engaged in helping their communities thrive.

This workshop will consider:

  • How is the community considered within a revitalization project?
  • Who leads these initiatives in challenging economic times?
  • How does the management of public places benefit from partnerships and creative collaborations to address the social, economic and environmental issues of the day?
  • As architects and designers you have a vital role to play as stewards of the public realm—how will you turn places around in your communities?

This session will challenge architects to examine how revitalization needs to re-consider the roles of the public, private and non-profit sectors and how unlikely partnerships are breathing new life into older places. It will include selected examples of revitalization projects from a variety of Canadian communities.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Gain a wider appreciation of revitalization and its role in community-building
  2. Discover how heritage conservation extends beyond the design of an individual buildings
  3. Understand four key aspects of revitalization which complement the architectural design of a “place”
  4. Identify public, private and non-profit partnership models for the stewardship of urban places

Speaker:

Judy Oberlander, Principal, and Associates Inc., specializes in the design of educational programs, conservation and fundraising strategies for governments, foundations and non-profit organizations.   Over the past 30 years she has worked in the public, private and non-profit sectors in Ottawa and Vancouver including heritage conservation projects in many parts of Canada.  She received her Master’s degree in Historic Preservation from the School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation at Columbia University and a Certificate in Fundraising from NYU.  In addition to her consulting practice, she currently teaches heritage conservation and urban revitalization courses. Her work has been recognized with two national continuing education awards and three City of Vancouver Heritage Awards. 

She established her firm in 1989 after working in Ottawa for the Heritage Canada Foundation and Commonwealth Historic Resource Management Ltd. Her recent clients include the North Vancouver Museum; Yukon Government; Willowbank School of Restoration Arts; Vancouver Foundation; the Vancouver Heritage Foundation; Osoyoos & District Museum and Archives; The Dr. Sun Yat-Sen Chinese Garden; the Heritage Legacy Fund of British Columbia; Canada Green Building Council and the BC Provincial Government among others. She has worked extensively with local governments for whom she and her team created heritage conservation strategies, interpretation, education and public awareness programs. Between1990-2002 she consulted to The Samuel and Saidye Bronfman Family Foundation in Montreal on the design of their Urban Issues Program and conducted site visits in communities across Canada. 

8:30 AM - 12:00 PM

19CE

Preserving McGill University’s Downtown Campus

TOUR

3 ConEd Learning Hours

This session will be offered again Wednesday, May 7, 2014 2:00 PM - 5:30 PM

Course Outline

The presentation will give participants the opportunity to view, first hand, the McGill University campus and its magnificent buildings (1835 to 1925) via a guided tour.  A lecture will follow presenting the findings of an exhaustive analysis which was conducted by FGMDA in 1996 based on numerous diagnostics and investigation techniques. We will look at the problems encountered, repair strategies which were considered and later implemented, as well as lessons learned from this in-depth investigation, many of which can be applied to any campus buildings, including future McGill campaigns.  Specific topics will include overall building envelope performance, restoration of slated and copper roofs, traditional wood windows and stone masonry.  

The tour and the lecture will be conducted by conservation architects Matteo Cendamo and Giovanni Dioadati, both of whom have been involved in the rehabilitation of McGill campus buildings since the beginning in 1997.

The McGill University campus is a 10-minute walk from the hotel where the OAA Annual Conference will take place.  No special equipment is required for touring the McGill campuses, although good walking shoes and weather appropriate clothing are recommended.  The walking tour will take one and a half hour, followed by a one and a half hour lecture, including a questions and answer period at the end, a total of three hours.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Understand the historic evolution of the Campus, of its different buildings types and of the related envelope problem
  2. Understand the design / decision making philosophy employed - based on the Standards and Guidelines for Conserving Historic Places in Canada
  3. Review diagnostic and investigation techniques used in the projects
  4. Review the conservation strategies employed to rehabilitate historic building envelope components with Slate and metal roofing, Stone masonry and Wood windows


Speaker

MATTEO CENDAMO, OAQ
Senior Architect and Associate of Fournier Gersovitz Moss Drolet et associés architectes

Matteo Cendamo is a graduate of McGill University where he earned a Bachelor of Science (Physics) in 1982 and a Bachelor of architecture in 1987. He has been with FGMDA since 1998 and was appointed one of its associates in 2009. He brings 27 years of experience to all projects on which he collaborates. 

Matteo began his career working on large buildings in Montreal, such as the Molson Centre (now the Bell Centre) and Canada Place. He has since then developed an expertise in the management of heritage conservation projects in urban settings. His dual training in architecture and physical sciences enables him to approach building materials in terms of their properties, dynamic action within the building envelope and against the conditions to which they are subjected. As a Project Architect, he works closely with Project Managers in the planning and implementation of projects, from risk analysis to costing, surveys and drawing specifications, scheduling, quality assurance/control and reporting, developing technical solutions wherever needed.

GIOVANNI (JOHN) DIODATI, Sr. Architect – Sr. Associate
OAA, OAQ, RAIC, FAPT, CAHP
Bachelor of Architecture, McGill University, 1990

Giovanni Diodati earned a bachelor of architecture from McGill University in 1990. With over 23 years of professional experience, Mr. Diodati plays a key role at Fournier Gersovitz Moss Drolet et associés architectes (FGMDA) as a specialist in materials conservation issues and in traditional construction techniques. He is in charge of building envelope restoration, restoration and rehabilitation projects with the firm, overseeing a group of specialised architects and participating in all project phases from the initial diagnosis to completion and in some cases, the long-term building monitoring and maintenance programs. He has been an associate with FGMDA since 1999.

ROBERT STANLEY, Director, Project Management, Facilities Operations and Development, McGill University

Robert Stanley obtained his Bachelor of Architecture from McGill University in 1973 and has been a member of l’Ordre des architectes du Québec since 1976. Upon obtaining his certification he cofounded and ran a building conservation architectural practice until 1991 at which time he joined McGill University’s project management team as a senior project manager. In 2007 he was appointed Director of Project Management of the Facilities Operations and Development, University Services. He leads a team of 34 dedicated staff members that manage over 9 million square feet of Canada’s most significant and historically important buildings.

8:30 AM - 10:00 AM

20CE

Building Biology- 7 Keys to Health and Resilience

1.5 ConEd Learning Hours

This session is also offered on Wednesday, May 07, 2014 from 2:00 PM to 3:30 PM

Course Outline

Our Heritage Buildings exist because they are resilient. There is a direct correlation between the resiliency of a building, its longevity, the health and well-being of its occupants, and long-term ecological performance. Has the “belt and suspenders” approach of current green building, mistaken redundancy for resiliency? This session examines the alternatives.

When the "Working Group on Healthy Building and Living" (1969 Translated from German) formed a multidisciplinary group to probe what made people healthy in the built environment they discovered seven factors inherent in pre-petrochemical buildings.  These factors were lacking in the Post WWII buildings that were causing ill-health. This formed much of the basis of what we now call Building Biology, a science that studies the health of occupants within buildings.

My experience as an architect in creating healthy environments for the well and the chemically sensitive has lead me to work with a variety of alternatives to conventional stick frame construction that follow the principles of Building Biology.

This lecture will explore the seven factors for resilient buildings that support health, ecology and building longevity and provide examples of alternatives to conventional construction.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Learn about the Building Biology approach to human health, building longevity and ecology
  2. Explore the essential paradigmatic differences between Building Biology and Green Building
  3. Learn about the seven common denominators found in pre-petrochemical era buildings which promote building longevity and the health and well-being of occupants.
  4. Learn how these seven factors can be applied to contemporary buildings through case-studies examples


Speaker:

Paula Baker-Laporte FAIA graduated from the University of Toronto, School of Architecture in 1978 and from The International Institute of Bau-Biologie and Ecology in 1995. In 2007, she was honored with investiture into the College of Fellows of the American Institute of Architects. She headed her award-winning architectural practice based in Santa Fe, New Mexico from 1986-2009  She is currently the president of EcoNest Architecture Inc. based in Ashland Oregon. Since 1992, Paula has dedicated her practice to the precepts of environmentally sound and health enhancing architecture. She was selected as one of our nation’s top 10 green architects by Natural Home Magazine July/August 2005 edition. She has developed a unique specialty in alternative construction for health and is a practicing architect as well as a consultant on the health aspects of building throughout North America, and in Central America, Switzerland, Singapore and Israel. 

Paula has lectured, taught, and published extensively on the topic of healthy and ecological design. She is currently developing and teaching courses for the International Institute of Bau-biologie and Ecology along with her teaching partner Stephen Collette. She is the primary author of Prescriptions for a Healthy House, 1st,-3rd edition, New Society Publishers1998- 2008 and co-author with husband Robert Laporte, of EcoNest: Creating Sustainable Sanctuaries of Clay, Straw and Timber, published by Gibbs Smith, 2005.  Her new book on Light Straw Clay construction is scheduled to be published in 2014. She is a contributing author to several other books and periodicals.

8:30 AM - 10:00 AM

21CE

Construction Lien Act

1.5 ConEd Learning hours

This session will be offered again Friday, May 9, 2014 from 8:30 AM - 10:00 AM

Course Outline

This session looks at the ins and outs of construction lien claims in complex and challenging situations. Learn how common projects such as condominiums, commercial tenant improvements, and residential subdivisions have special rules that can be tricky for the unwary, and how project owners like municipalities and colleges require careful treatment. The latest legal updates will be provided including an interesting review of the leading case on liening public infrastructure projects. Take your basic knowledge of construction liens to a new level in this highly informative session.

Learning Objectives:

TBA

Speaker

Glenn Ackerley Glenn practises exclusively in the area of construction law. He represents clients from across the construction industry – including public and private owners, developers, contractors, subtrades, suppliers, and consultants – in a variety of construction-related matters. He is regularly consulted about negotiating and preparing construction and consultant contracts, procurement issues, and risk avoidance strategies. When disputes arise, Glenn acts for clients from both the ICI and residential sectors in construction lien and trust claims, bond claims, and construction delay and deficiency claims.

Glenn is active in the industry, participating on boards, committees and working groups to support and improve the industry, such as on the Council of Ontario Construction Associations' Lien Act Subcommittee, and the Ministry of Health/Ontario General Contractors Association Task Force on standard documents. Glenn sits on the Board of Directors of the Canadian Construction Association, and is the Past Chairman of the Board of the Toronto Construction Association. He has sat on the Executive of the Construction Section of the Ontario Bar Association for many years.

 

8:30 AM - 10:00 AM

22CE

Contract Law

1.5 ConEd Learning Hours

This session will be offered again Thursday, May 08, 2014 10:30 AM - 12:00 PM

Course outline

This session will illustrate principles of contract law and negligence as well as aspects of the Ontario Court system from a practical perspective, based on actual cases involving professional liability claims against Ontario architects. The presentation will review in detail 4-5 cases based on professional liability claims which have been litigated against Ontario architects.  Causes of action in contract and negligence will be reviewed.  In each case, the Plaintiff's theory of liability and the Architect's defence will be covered along with the process followed for dispute resolution. The final outcome of each case will also be reviewed. Sometime will be allotted for questions or discussion regarding each case study.

Learning Objectives:

  1. To provide an overview of the Ontario court system;
  2. To provide an overview of Alternative Dispute Resolution;
  3. To describe basic elements of contract law and how contract claims are litigated and defended;
  4. To describe basic elements of the law of negligence, duty of care and standard of care and liability to persons outside of the contract.

Speakers:

Charles Simco has been with Shibley Righton LLP since 1985, and is an expert in construction law. He is a litigator with an emphasis on construction litigation, surety, professional liability litigation, and employment law. Charles has appeared before all levels of courts in Ontario and has also appeared before several tribunals and inquests. The depth and breadth of his experience allows him to guide clients through the most technical of construction disputes, and to provide practical advice and direction on issues involving employment law.

He has been recognized as an expert in the practice of construction law and professional liability by L’Expert. Charles has also been recognized by such legal and construction organizations as the Ontario Bar Association, Surety Association of Canada, Ontario Association of Architects, University of Toronto Faculty of Architecture, and Ontario Real Estate Association, all of which have invited him to speak on a variety of topics related to construction and professional liability issues.

8:30 AM - 10:00 AM

23CE

Heritage Structures- Lessons from Claims

1.5 ConEd Learning Hours

This session will be offered again Friday, May 9, 2014 8:30 AM - 10:00 AM

Course outline

Heritage structures often demand unique architectural requirements and present special claims.

The Claims Managers from Pro-Demnity Insurance Company will review several interesting claims that will illustrate different liability and insurance issues created by the architectural requirements for Heritage structures.  You will be shown how complex a claim may become and what is needed to defend you.

Learning Objective:

In this presentation, the Pro-Demnity Insurance team will:

  • Review Claims Process
  • Explore Heritage Building Case Studies
  • Discuss some of the architectural considerations for heritage structures and the problems these may present.

Pro-Demnity Insurance encourages you to attend this interactive presentation by a team of Pro-Demnity Insurance Claims Professionals. The presentation will include question and answer periods.

Speakers:

David Croft OAA, FRAIC:Mr. Croft is the Vice President of Claims at Pro-Demnity Insurance Company for over 20 years.  He specializes in large or complex claims and is responsible for forming the current Claims department procedures.  Prior to joining Pro-Demnity Insurance, Mr. Croft held executive positions at a large US Construction Company building tower buildings, residential condominiums and shopping centers.  He was also a partner in an architectural firm for over 16 years designing a wide range of buildings.  Mr. Croft was a “Theme Designer” at EXPO 67 and designed science exhibits for RCA and General Electric.

David Gillespie:Mr. Gillespie is the Deputy Claims Manager, Senior Architect at Pro-Demnity Insurance Company for over 9 years.  He comes to Pro-Demnity Insurance from having been a sole practitioner in Ireland for 3 years and a partner and sole practitioner in Ontario for 22 years.  He has Regional Design Awards in both Ireland and Canada and has experience in institutional, commercial, residential and educational projects in Ireland, Scotland, Canada and the United States.  He also has experience as a mediator, dispute conciliator and as an expert witness.

10:30 AM - 12:00 PM

24CE

Protecting Heritage Elements during Demo/Construction

1.5 ConEd Learning Hours

This session will also be offered Wednesday, May 7, 2014 4:00 PM - 5:30 PM and Thursday, May 8, 2014 4:00 PM - 5:30 PM 

Course outline

Case study of measures undertaken to identify the risks to heritage building elements and provide appropriate protection procedures during major demolition and rehabilitation efforts at 180 Wellington, Ottawa.

  • Description of the overall abatement, demolition and seismic reinforcement scope
  • Description of heritage-defining components of the building
  • Discussion of various heritage materials, their defining characteristics and their vulnerabilities.
  • Discussion of particular challenges related to fine arts conservation
  • Establishing and implementing protective measures and procedures for architectural bronze and steel items, exterior stone cladding, interior marble finishes and ornamental glass tile ceiling mosaics
  • Monitoring and adapting demolition and construction methods while work is ongoing.

Learning objectives:

  1. Identifying risks to heritage building elements during a major demolition/rehabilitation project.
  2. Establishing the appropriate measures to mitigate the risks for each material and configuration.
  3. Understanding the challenges in documenting and implementing protective measures
  4. Establishing protocols for monitoring, maintaining, and adapting heritage protection materials and procedures during demolition/construction activities

Speaker:

Eric Stein, OAQ, APT Senior Associate

Eric Stein received his Bachelor of Architecture from McGill University in Montreal. He joined FGMDA in 2001 and was appointed one of its associates in 2009. He has over 22 years of experience in his field. 

Mr. Stein has worked as Project Architect on medium to large scale commercial and institutional projects, many of which are heritage conservation projects. He is well-versed in conceptual work and in all areas of project management, including costing, scheduling, quality assurance/control and contract administration. He is also proficient in the integration and automation of the production of computerized drawings. 

Heritage conservation projects have included rehabilitation of the Wellington building in Ottawa and of the St. Thomas Consolidated Courthouse in  Ontario; restoration and interior design of Montreal’s FACE school auditorium; restoration of the Mappin Wing façade at Rideau Hall in Ottawa; elaboration of protective scaffolding measures in view of important restoration works on Parliament Hill’s West Block in Ottawa; masonry and roof restoration of the Beaconsfield Yacht Club; and restoration of the façade of the Montreal Herald.

Mr. Stein has also collaborated in the design of the Dorshei Emet Congregation Synagogue in Hampstead, Quebec, and of two private residences in the Quebec Laurentians; as well as in the roof restoration of Le Château Apartments in downtown Montreal. 

Prior to FGMDA, Eric participated in a wide range of projects in the Greater Montreal area : design and construction of the UQAM’s President Kennedy Wing and rehabilitation of their Sherbrooke Wing; design of the La Petite Bourgogne Sports Centre; design and construction of the Notre-Dame Street viaduct;  a major addition tothe Palais des Congrès de Montreal; restoration of historic Saint-Stanislas-de-Kotska bell towers; and several other modifications brought to the St-Laurent and Ahuntsic CEGEPs.

Eric is a valued member of FGMDA’s Information Technologies Committee that plans and manages the company’s  IT needs in view of keeping FGMDA professionals—and their work—at the edge of new technologies.

10:30 AM - 12:00 PM

25CE

Contract Law

1.5 ConEd Learning Hours

This session will be also be offered Thursday, May 08, 2014 8:30 AM - 10:00 AM

This session will illustrate principles of contract law and negligence as well as aspects of the Ontario Court system from a practical perspective, based on actual cases involving professional liability claims against Ontario architects. The presentation will review in detail 4-5 cases based on professional liability claims which have been litigated against Ontario architects.  Causes of action in contract and negligence will be reviewed.  In each case, the Plaintiff's theory of liability and the Architect's defence will be covered along with the process followed for dispute resolution. The final outcome of each case will also be reviewed. Sometime will be allotted for questions or discussion regarding each case study.

Learning Objectives:

  1. To provide an overview of the Ontario court system;
  2. To provide an overview of Alternative Dispute Resolution;
  3. To describe basic elements of contract law and how contract claims are litigated and defended;
  4. To describe basic elements of the law of negligence, duty of care and standard of care and liability to persons outside of the contract

Speakers:

Charles Simco has been with Shibley Righton LLP since 1985, and is an expert in construction law. He is a litigator with an emphasis on construction litigation, surety, professional liability litigation, and employment law. Charles has appeared before all levels of courts in Ontario and has also appeared before several tribunals and inquests. The depth and breadth of his experience allows him to guide clients through the most technical of construction disputes, and to provide practical advice and direction on issues involving employment law.

He has been recognized as an expert in the practice of construction law and professional liability by L’Expert. Charles has also been recognized by such legal and construction organizations as the Ontario Bar Association, Surety Association of Canada, Ontario Association of Architects, University of Toronto Faculty of Architecture, and Ontario Real Estate Association, all of which have invited him to speak on a variety of topics related to construction and professional liability issues.

10:30 AM - 12:00 PM

26CE

Curtain Wall Failures: Causes of & Methods of Retrofits

1.5 ConEd Learning Hours

This session is also being offered Thursday, May 8, 2014 2:00 PM to 3:30 PM

Course Outline

PART ONE: Functionality and Means of Failure

The first part of the presentation provides examples of the most common ways in which a curtain wall can fail, including air and water penetration, structural failures, and aesthetic degradation. From design and installation, to components reaching their design life-cycle, curtain walls fail for a variety of reasons. Real life examples are provided and discussed to highlight these means of failure.

PART TWO: Methods of Retrofit: Toronto City Hall Case Study

The second part of the presentation starts with a high level discussion of the main approaches to retrofits. An in-depth case study of the retrofit at Toronto City Hall is then presented. From 2009 to 2012, the window system at Toronto City Hall was converted from a single glazed, zipper gasket system to a fully custom, double glazed system. As City Hall is a designated heritage building, the new system had to meet strict heritage, as well as performance, criteria. The challenges of designing a custom retrofit window system and the quality assurance methods and procedures used throughout design and construction are discussed in detail. 

Learning Objectives

  1. To understand the essential functions of curtain wall systems and the ways in which they can fail.
  2. To understand the reasons why curtain wall systems fail, and be able to identify the signs of failure.
  3. To understand the process of designing and implementing a retrofit within the confines of a building with a heritage designation.
  4. To understand the challenges of preparing for and implementing a retrofit on an occupied building.

Speaker:

Rob Wood, P.Eng. 

Mr. Wood is the President of C3 Polymeric Limited, a leading provider of curtain wall retrofits on occupied commercial buildings, and a member of The C3 Group of Companies. At C3 Polymeric, he has overseen the retrofit of five high rise office towers across Canada, including Toronto City Hall’s two office towers; 400 University Avenue  in Toronto; and City Centre Place and Oxford Towers in downtown Edmonton. Over the last five years, more than 15,000 vision units, spandrels, and skylights have been retrofitted under Rob's supervision.

Rob is a graduate of the System Design Engineering program at the University of Waterloo. He has been with The C3 Group since 2001, and has held various management positions within the group. 

Rob is on the board of the Great Lakes Ontario Chapter of the Young Presidents Organization (YPO), and is a member of other organizations, including BOMA Toronto and the Professional Engineers of Ontario. Rob is an active speaker, having conducted over 50 seminars and presentations on curtain wall retrofit to over 750 attendees over the past two years.

10:30 AM - 12:00 PM

27CE

Bringing the Past to Light

1.5 ConEd Learning Hours

This session is also being offered Friday, May 9, 2014 4:00 PM to 5:30 PM

Course Outline

Restoring heritage buildings presents unique challenges; careful consideration is needed before any intervention may be permitted. The landscape is further complicated with the use of LED technology.  It has evolved into the “go to” solution, although there are still some specific considerations to address to ensure their suitability and successful results.  One key to successful heritage (and) adaptive reuse is a successful process; case studies of sustainable adaptive reuse and heritage designated projects reinforce the potential harmony of the old and the new, when approached with careful analysis and creative design.  

Learning Objectives:

  1. To understand how "sustainability" applies to re-lighting old buildings
  2. To become aware of how lighting technology can affect the project’s heritage sensibility and other outcomes.
  3. To recognize how successfully integrated design process affects results
  4. To experience projects where old buildings breathe new life with updated design and technology.

Speaker:

Deborah Gottesman is the principal of Gottesman Associates, an architectural lighting design firm established in 1999, with distinctive expertise in sustainability and heritage applications. Deborah's 25 years in all facets of the lighting industry, including design, engineering, management, education, and manufacturing gives her a contextual understanding of lighting from all perspectives. 

Deborah has successfully worked on projects in many sectors, and has taught lighting at all levels to a wide audience from students to senior architects. A past president of the Toronto Section IES, Deborah has been involved in the IESNA at local, regional, and international levels.

2:00 PM - 5:30 PM

28CE

Natural Ventilation: The Art of Balancing Heat and Air

3 ConEd learning hours

This session is also offered Wednesday, May 07, 2014 2:00 PM - 5:30 PM  

Course Outline

This session will cover the basics of natural ventilation, the design process and project examples.  It will focus on the following key points.

What is Natural Ventilation- A definition as well as how it impacts designers.

Human requirements- What are people’s expectations and their base needs (ventilation, temperature etc.) from natural ventilation.

Driving forces- The physics behind Natural Ventilation.

Design process- An examination of the typical methods for implementing natural ventilation followed by a recommended improved approach.

Examples- Project examples completed by RWDI.

Is it working? Conclusions and closing thoughts about Natural Ventilation.

Learning Objectives:

  1. How to identify risks and opportunities in buildings for natural ventilation.
  2. A process to develop a viable natural ventilation system.
  3. The range of simple and complex modeling and analysis tools available to support design.
  4. How other building designs have incorporated natural ventilation into a variety of projects. 

Speaker

John Alberico is a Project Director specializing in air quality and microclimate assessments. He joined RWDI in 1988, and became a Principal in 2004.  He is a Canadian Certified Environmental Professional.

As a Project Director, he provides overall technical direction to engineering teams on air quality and microclimate projects ensuring that a high level of service is provided and RWDI’s interests are preserved on all projects.

John’s area of technical expertise is in exhaust and dust dispersion, and wind flow around buildings, which has included involvement in several hundred projects providing expert consultation, and conducting both numerical and wind tunnel modelling. His primary focus has been in the institutional, healthcare, higher education and pharmaceutical sectors.  His involvement in many of these projects has included environmental impact assessments and Certificates of Approval in Ontario.

John has also managed engineering teams that have provided air quality, odour, dust, ventilation, noise, acoustic and vibration assessments for a broad range of applications on local, national and international projects. These have included pits and quarries, landfills, composting facilities, roadways, residential developments, and industrial facilities in addition to healthcare, higher education and pharmaceutical facilities.

Michael Carl is a Senior Technical Coordinator at RWDI, specializing in computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and building science.  Michael received his Bachelor of Engineering from the University of Guelph in 2005 and his Master of Applied Science in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Victoria in 2008.  Over the past five years at RWDI Michael has worked on numerous projects using CFD, including evaluating the HVAC system for the grand Mosque at Makkah and the transport of sand over large stretches of newly developed railway in Saudi Arabia.  Michael has also focused on natural and mechanical ventilation in garages, bus terminals and atria including the coupling of advanced modeling techniques such as CFD with RWDI’s in-house wind tunnel and analytical models to evaluate and improve design.

Duncan Phillips’s area is air movement as it affects people and processes. He began as a senior technical leader in the RWDI CFD modeling department. Within a year, he was a key client contact of the department. Within five years, business development was also part of his role. Now as a lead consultant, he continues to mentor technical teams.

One of Duncan's professional passions is applying climate forecasting processes and technologies to improve building design, increase human comfort, and reduce environmental impact. He has done innovative work on natural ventilation, the use of thermal mass to store and release heat, and the use of "wind towers" to cool streetscapes. Says Duncan: "Most people at RWDI have a sense of ethical responsibility to reduce human impacts on the environment. We are fortunate to be able to apply our ethics in the work we do."

Recently transferred to the U.K. from Guelph, Duncan says his family has adapted well. His kids love to travel, and although he misses the solitude and remote landscapes of Ontario when camping, he and his family are pleased to be exploring another part of the world.

2:00 PM - 5:30 PM

29CE

Make Great Digital Photos of Heritage Sites and Restorations

3 ConEd learning hours

This session is also offered Friday, May 9, 2014 8:30 AM - 12:00 PM  

Course Outline

The past exists mainly in memory. After memory, we have photographs. Buildings do not last forever: Some disappear completely, and some are preserved in part through re-imaging and skillful renovation. High quality digital architectural photography is the most accurate and reliable tool for documenting and preserving heritage buildings. In addition, competent digital photography can provide a pristine, reliable record of current architectural undertakings - some of which will become the ‘heritage’ buildings of the future. To do all this well one needs a working understanding of today’s digital imaging hardware and software. But one must also know how to archive and preserve the digital information for the benefit of future generations. This workshop will expose serious architectural practitioners to the aesthetic and technical possibilities of high-end digital architectural photography in a way that will be useful for documentary, display, marketing, and archival purposes. 

Learning Objectives:

  1. Participants will learn how best to use digital photography to document heritage buildings and restoration
  2. Participants will learn to select the most useful digital cameras, lenses, and computer tools for this work.
  3. Participants will learn to appreciate the range and power of Photoshop enhancement and corrections.
  4. Participants will learn how to preserve and protect high-resolution digital images for archival purposes.

Speaker:

Gerry Kopelow is an internationally published author, teacher and training professional. His writing and photography have appeared in many periodicals and magazines. His textbooks on photography are distributed world-wide and are respected as definitive works in the field. He has lectured and delivered workshops for a wide variety of groups and institutions, including The University of Florida, The Georgia Institution of Technology, The Pratt Institute, The Cooper Union, The University of Manitoba and the American Institute of Architects. 

He has lectured at the Harvard graduate School of design, where he was invited to establish a Continuing Education professional development program for architects, Gerry has also consulted for Canon USA in relation to photography education. Gerry has taught at RAIC National Conferences and OAA Annual Conferences for a number of years.

2:00 PM - 5:30 PM

30CE

Minimizing Risk in Heritage Conservation Projects

3 ConEd learning hours

This session is being offered again Wednesday, May 7, 2:00 PM –5:30 PM

Course Outline

The Canadian Association of Heritage Professionals (CAHP) strives for and promotes excellence in heritage conservation.  Members ‘ fields of heritage expertise include but are not limited to archaeology, engineering, architecture, conservation, crafts and contracting, environmental assessment, planning, historians, landscape architecture, museology,  material testing  and recording. 

The Workshop will begin by identifying specialized heritage trades and exploring how to find them. There will be an overview of the breath of roles heritage contractors and craftsmen can play in your conservation projects. 

The intent of the workshop is for architects to learn about the unique contribution that contractors and craftsmen specializing in heritage conservation make to the preservation of our built environment and how their expertise can contribute to the architect’s success. The workshops will include case studies that describe a number of projects where difficulties that arose could have been alleviated by involving the heritage contractor and craftsman in either the planning stages or in risk avoidance when as-found conditions were not as anticipated in the contract documents. 

The workshop will end with ‘lessons learned’. Here you will learn how integrating the heritage contractor and tradesman as part of the team averts cost overruns, schedule delays and high risk contract implementation. 

Speakers:

Jane Burgess, OAA, CAHP, APTI
Partner Stevens Burgess Architects Inc.

Jane is a founding partner of Stevens Burgess Architects (SBA and has over thirty years’ experience in the heritage industry. She is presently on the CAHP Board. and  has served on the OAA Board and the Toronto Preservation Board. Jane has undertaken conservation projects for all three levels of government and is presently a Vendor of Record for heritage project for Infrastructure Ontario, the City of Toronto and the City of Hamilton. Jane’s experience in the conservation industry runs the entire gamut from formulating heritage policy to artifact conservation. High profile sites on which she has worked include, Dundurn Castle, Fort York Armoury, George Brown House, Old Stone Church, Old Don Jail, Old Fort York, Old Whitby Psychiatric Site, Sir James Whitney School, Ste. Marie Amongst the Huron, and the Whitney Block and Tower. SBA is the recipient of conservation awards from Heritage Toronto, Niagara-On-The-Lake, Building of Excellence, and CAHP.

David Edgar B.A (Hons.), HND Arch. Cons, ICON, SPAB, CAC
Foreman Site Carver for RJW GEM Campbell Inc

David is the Conservator & Foreman Site Carver responsible for the stonemasons for the restoration of the West Block, Parliament Hill, Ottawa.  David is a graduate of the renowned Weymouth College stone conservation programme and has worked as a conservator, carver and mason alongside other heritage professionals & conservation organisations (including English Heritage, the Churches Conservation Trust & The National Trust) to ensure the sympathetic maintenance and repair of Listed Buildings across England.

Completed projects include:  The Cathedrals of Salisbury, Winchester, Manchester & Sheffield; The Garrick Club, London; Central Library & Stanley Park, Liverpool; St Mary's Church, Thorton-Le-Moors; Brownsea Castle & Thomas Hardy's Cottage, Dorset and Cartmel Priory.  David has worked in Canada since mid-2012.

Philip V. Hoad, BA (Hons), CAHP
President, Empire Restoration Inc.
Principal, Applied Roof Technology Ltd.

Philip has worked on multiple National Historic Sites and major heritage building projects across Eastern Canada as a contractor, project manager and site supervisor for the past 20 years. He spent a significant time with Parks Canada and has held a number of other key positions in both the institutional and public sectors, most recently as, Manager of Heritage Facilities & Capital Planning at the City of Hamilton.

He has presented seminars and served on professional committees and advisory boards for Construct Canada, APTI and ASTM and was responsible for modifications to the Canadian National Master Specifications for Slate Roofing. He is a Faculty Associate at Willowbank School of Restoration Arts in Queenston and is currently serving his second term as an Executive Director of the Canadian Association of Heritage Professionals. He is also the Canadian representative for Shaws of Darwen, a UK architectural terra cotta and faience manufacturer.

Don Hutchinson, GSC, CAHP
President of J. D. Strachan Construction Limited

Don started his career as an apprentice carpenter in 1974 with Fairwin Construction Limited where he worked for 10 years.  Working on projects such as #1 Kings College Circle at U of T, Canada’s Wonderland, Jack Diamond’s Office on the Esplanade and Kortright Centre  for Conservation.  He gradually worked his way up from Apprentice Carpenter to Superintendent, Project Coordinator and now Owner and President of J. D. Strachan Construction Limited.  Don has been involved with projects such as Osgoode Hall, over 50 projects for U of T, over 50 projects at Queens Park, Fort York, George Brown House, the Law Society of Upper Canada and  as Construction Managers of St. Paul’s Bloor Anglican Church in Toronto.  Don is a member of Ontario General Contractors Association, Toronto Construction Association, APT, ACO, CAHP and Don has his Gold Seal Certificate in Construction Management.  After 40 years Don is familiar with most of the Heritage Architects in Toronto and surrounding areas.

 

 

 

2:00 PM - 5:30 PM

31CE

OBC Part 5: Understanding Durability…what is a “Durable” Building?

3 ConEd Learning Hours

Course Outline

OBC Division B, Part 5 requires that “…assemblies exposed to the exterior shall be in accordance with good practice such as described in CSA S478, “Guideline on Durability in Buildings”. 

This means architects are responsible for understanding and applying durability concepts to environmental separations (building envelopes or building enclosures) and their structure. Failure to do so can lead to catastrophic losses and massive claims against architects. The “Leaky Condo” crisis in British Columbia in the late 1990’s is an example of the widespread economic and social consequences where adherence to the fundamental concept that buildings are required to be durable was ignored by the design professions and construction industry.  

The CaGBC offers a LEED credit for “Durability” based on a documented process in accordance with the CSA S478 Guideline, and the Toronto Green Roof Bylaw references the Guideline.

There must be something in this document that can be used by architects to support code compliance and good practice. This program is directed towards understanding what that is.

This program will review the content of CSA S478, Guideline on Durability in Buildings, consider some of the implications impacting architects’ designs and discuss opportunities for architects to reconsider their approach to building envelopes to improve their overall durability.

This program for the OAA is a collaboration between Pro-Demnity Insurance Company and Morrison Hershfield Limited with the objective of enhancing the design services provided by Ontario architects and reducing claims against architects where building envelopes are considered not durable.

Learning Objectives:

  1. The significance of the Guideline on Durability for Buildings in Part 5 of the OBC
  2. Structure and content of the Guideline on Durability
  3. Key Concepts including the definition of Durability, and the requirement to discuss with the owner the obligation to maintain the building and its components
  4. Application of Quality Assurance and Building Science principles
  5. Design Service Life of a building and its components
  6. Predicted Service Life of Components and Assemblies
  7. Design and Construction Considerations impacting durability
  8. The role and significance of Operation, Maintenance and Inspection Programs
  9. Investigation of Deterioration, causes and remediation 

Included will be a discussion on the critical implications on maintenance that comes with sound, durability focused design. This new communication requirement for architects has implications for claims exposure and what constitutes “good practice”. 

Speakers:

Brian Sim Architect AIBC, PP / FRAIC 

Brian is a British Columbia architect with broad experience including extensive review and analysis of building envelope failures widely characterized as “Leaky Condos” or “Leaky Buildings” during the crisis that first became widely known in the mid 1990’s. The epidemic of failures and catastrophic losses prompted a withdrawal of professional liability insurers willing to insure BC architects and engineers. The losses continue to be felt as only about half of the impacted buildings have been repaired. 

Brian has been deeply involved with both the AIBC and RAIC, serving on AIBC Council, as RAIC President and as Chancellor of the RAIC College of Fellows. 

He is currently a member of the Canadian Commission on Building and Fire Codes which is the body responsible for the National Building Code in Canada, where he has been a member of the Executive Committee as well as chairing a number of special Task Groups. 

The Ontario Building Code is derived from the NBC as are all provincial and territorial building codes in Canada. Brian’s broad experience in practice in British Columbia, his service on behalf of the profession, his involvement with the CCBFC and his familiarity with the concepts inherent in durability of buildings makes him particularly well qualified to address this important subject.

Brian has been a significant contributor to a number of Pro-Demnity Insurance Company programs including delivery of Loss Prevention Events focused on lessons to be learned from the BC Leaky Condo crisis. 

David Kayll FMA, P.Eng (ON, NS, NB, NL)

David is a principal of Morrison Hershfield and a professional engineer specializing in building science and building envelope, based in the Ottawa office. His main areas of practice include building envelope / enclosure issues, building envelope commissioning, building science analysis and design and facility management consulting for both new and existing facilities.

David worked for Morrison Hershfield in the Vancouver office from 1999 to 2003, where he became immersed in the repair of “Leaky Condo” buildings, diagnosing causes of failures and assisting with repair or replacement strategies. From 2003 to the present, David has worked in the Ottawa office covering a broad range of projects including heritage building restoration, new building design, failed building envelope rehabilitation and energy performance evaluation. Projects have ranged from Manitoba to Baffin Island to Newfoundland. 

He and his colleagues are well respected for their knowledgeable, pragmatic and effective approach to addressing building envelope issues, whether involved in the initial design to achieve Code compliance performance, achievement of the LEED credit for Durability or in assessing failures and recommending repairs. 

He is a member of the National Building Code’s Standing Committee on Environmental Separation (NBC Part 5) and is actively involved on a number of the Task Groups of the Committee.

In addition, David has assisted Pro-Demnity Insurance Company on assignments aimed at assisting architects avoid claims stemming from envelope failure.

2:00 PM - 5:30 PM

32CE

Manitoba Hydro Place: Lesson Learned

3 ConEd Learning Hours

This session will also be offered Thursday, May 8, 2014 8:30 AM - 12:00 PM

Course Outline

Manitoba Hydro Place, designed and delivered through a formal IDP, offers a new way to think, design and deliver climate-responsive, resilient architecture in the 21st century. Three years after opening, it has surpassed all of its original objectives inclusive of LEED Platinum (originally Gold) and 60% energy savings (current 65%). Key is the climate responsive design developed through the IDP which shifted the challenge of the city’s extreme climate into an opportunity for optimizing passive energy. Representatives from the core IDP behind the innovative, paradigm-shifting design solution including the client, the architect, and climate engineer will deliver an intensive case study on the IDP process. They will also demonstrate how the project offers an expanded the concept of sustainable, environmentally responsible design which prioritizes city building and architectural excellence in the interest of improving the human experience.  

Learning Objectives

  1. To understand the IDP is first and foremost about creating healthy, supportive environments that prioritize the human experience and the individual.
  2. To demonstrate the value of IDP for synthesizing the complexities of making architecture in today’s climate of rapid change related to climate, technology, demographics and the economy while setting a clear path toward sustainability and innovation
  3. To position IDP as a tool for whole systems thinking to achieve design excellence, risk mitigation, operational efficiency, and value creation (social, economic, environmental).
  4. To affirm that the IDP enables architecture to be both poetic and didactic:  one building can make a meaningful difference and it is our collective responsibility - as clients, architects and specialists - to visualize and realize buildings that contribute to making a better world.

Speakers:

THE CLIENT

Tom Akerstream  B.E.S., B. Arch., M. Arch.

Tom has worked in the field of energy management and sustainability for over 30 years and was the Energy and Sustainability Advisor on Manitoba Hydro’s design team for the corporation’s new Headquarters, Manitoba Hydro Place. Tom has held numerous Board positions including past President of the Manitoba Electric League, founding Director of the Canada Green Building Council, Chairman Power Smart National Research and Development Board and has received numerous awards, most recently the  “Award of Merit” by CSA for his work in energy efficiency and sustainability, the “2012 Green Champion Award” by the Manitoba Chapter of the Canada Green Building Council and the Certificate of Recognition for Energy Efficiency and Renewables - Canadian Standards Association (CSA).  

Mark Pauls, P.Eng., M.Sc.

Mark is the Building Energy Management Engineer for Manitoba Hydro. He was responsible for implementing a Measurement and Verification Plan and optimizing the systems at Manitoba Hydro Place for maximum comfort and energy efficiency. Mark currently oversees the design and construction of new facilities at Manitoba Hydro. He has a Master of Science in Climate Engineering from Danube University Krems in Austria.

THE ARCHITECT

Bruce Kuwabara, OC, RAIC, RIBA, OAA

Bruce Kuwabara is a founding partner of KPMB Architects, an Officer of the Order of Canada and recipient of the RAIC Gold Medal. He has contributed to Canadian architecture with such projects as the ground breaking LEED Platinum Manitoba Hydro Place in Winnipeg, Le Quartier Concordia for Concordia University in Montreal, Canada’s National Ballet School in Toronto and the Canadian Museum of Nature in Ottawa.  He is currently the design architect for projects at Princeton University, Northwestern University, Boston University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the Toronto 2015 Pan/Parapan American Games Athletes’ Village. He is the first Chair of Waterfront Toronto Design Review Panel and was recently appointed as the new Chair of the Canadian Centre for Architecture (CCA) in Montreal. 

THE CLIMATE ENGINEER

Thomas Auer – Managing Director & Partner 

Thomas is partner and managing director of Transsolar, an engineering firm with offices in Stuttgart, Munich, Paris and New York. He collaborated with world known architecture firms on numerous international design projects. He is a specialist in energy efficiency, user comfort and sustainable urban design. Thomas has developed concepts for buildings around the world noted for their innovative strategies – an integral part of signature architecture. Thomas taught at Yale University and was a visiting professor at the ESA in Paris and other Universities. He speaks frequently at conferences and received the Treehugger “best of green” award in 2010.

2:00 PM - 3:30 PM

33CE

Architects and Mandatory Condominium Reserve Fund Studies

1.5 ConEd Learning Hours 

This session will also be offered Friday, May 9, 2014 8:30 AM -10:00 AM

Course Outline

Reserve fund studies for Residential Condominiums, are mandated by law, to be done in the 1st year of occupancy, and every 3rd year after that. The reserve fund study is commissioned by the agents or Condominium owners of the building. The study uses a protocol that is normally not intrusive but relies on the professional experience and techniques that architects already use in preparing contract documents, coordinating consultants, and performing field reviews of construction. This session puts together opportunity, profitability, client service delivery requirements and the methodology of conducting and reporting the study.

Reserve fund studies have the purpose of identifying the scope of items to maintain the quality of the building stock over a 30 year horizon. The funds to identify the items and implement the maintenance are budgeted and reserved by condominium owners to facilitate resident enjoyment and safety. The building appearance is part of the neighborhood pride that Ontario wants to maintain over that period. The study analyses the items, building systems, assemblies and finishes that have to be maintained to the initial design standard of the building. The objective:  to investigate and state the condition of all the items and indicate the frequency for their maintenance or replacement, and further provide the periodic cost expenditure that is associated in a professionally compiled report document. This report forms part of the decision making protocol for investment analysis and maintenance of the building.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Ontario’s  rationale for Reserve Fund Studies;
  2. Client groups requiring Condominium Reserve Fund Studies;
  3. The architects’ rationale for and competition in doing Reserve Fund Studies;
  4. Overview of Risk Management and Insurance for Reserve Fund Studies;
  5. Overview of Reserve Fund Study Template and Building Condition Reports.

Speaker:

Paul Hastings is a practicing architect with his own firm in Oakville, prior to joining Public Works and Government Services Canada. He has been a Vice President of the OAA where his term ended Dec.31.2013. He has founded and coordinated the Small Practice Information Forum, SPIF, for architects where many shared challenges were discussed and solutions formulated for practice viability. He has published a well-received article in Perspectives Magazine, the Sole Practitioner: Part 1, and has given presentations on the Future of Architecture to various groups. With a background in Engineering, Environmental Design Studies and Architecture, he has used his multidisciplinary training to complete many projects and recently achieved Green Globes 4 on a renovation project, surpassing the Green Globes 3 client requirement. Paul has been involved with Ryerson University Department of Architecture as the OAA liaison on the Program Advisory Committee and provided assistance thru Council to remove road blocks in the recording of intern experience. He was the Chair of the Discipline Committee for years, and was active on various other OAA committees as well. The cumulative experience has provided a unique opportunity to gain an in-depth look into the practice and business of architecture and see great opportunity for the profession in a variety of areas.

2:00 PM - 3:30 PM

34CE

Curtain Wall Failures: Causes of & Methods of Retrofits

1.5 ConEd Learning Hours

This session is also being offered Thursday, May 8, 2014 10:30 PM to 12:00 PM

Course Outline

PART ONE: Functionality and Means of Failure

The first part of the presentation provides examples of the most common ways in which a curtain wall can fail, including air and water penetration, structural failures, and aesthetic degradation. From design and installation, to components reaching their design life-cycle, curtain walls fail for a variety of reasons. Real life examples are provided and discussed to highlight these means of failure.

PART TWO: Methods of Retrofit: Toronto City Hall Case Study

The second part of the presentation starts with a high level discussion of the main approaches to retrofits. An in-depth case study of the retrofit at Toronto City Hall is then presented. From 2009 to 2012, the window system at Toronto City Hall was converted from a single glazed, zipper gasket system to a fully custom, double glazed system. As City Hall is a designated heritage building, the new system had to meet strict heritage, as well as performance, criteria. The challenges of designing a custom retrofit window system and the quality assurance methods and procedures used throughout design and construction are discussed in detail. 

Learning Objectives

  1. To understand the essential functions of curtain wall systems and the ways in which they can fail.
  2. To understand the reasons why curtain wall systems fail, and be able to identify the signs of failure.
  3. To understand the process of designing and implementing a retrofit within the confines of a building with a heritage designation.
  4. To understand the challenges of preparing for and implementing a retrofit on an occupied building.

Speaker:

Rob Wood, P.Eng. 

Mr. Wood is the President of C3 Polymeric Limited, a leading provider of curtain wall retrofits on occupied commercial buildings, and a member of The C3 Group of Companies. At C3 Polymeric, he has overseen the retrofit of five high rise office towers across Canada, including Toronto City Hall’s two office towers; 400 University Avenue  in Toronto; and City Centre Place and Oxford Towers in downtown Edmonton. Over the last five years, more than 15,000 vision units, spandrels, and skylights have been retrofitted under Rob's supervision.

Rob is a graduate of the System Design Engineering program at the University of Waterloo. He has been with The C3 Group since 2001, and has held various management positions within the group. 

Rob is on the board of the Great Lakes Ontario Chapter of the Young Presidents Organization (YPO), and is a member of other organizations, including BOMA Toronto and the Professional Engineers of Ontario. Rob is an active speaker, having conducted over 50 seminars and presentations on curtain wall retrofit to over 750 attendees over the past two years.

2:00 PM - 3:30 PM

35CE

Heritage Adaptive Reuse: A Catalyst for Revitalization

1.5 ConEd Learning Hours

Course Outline

The University of Windsor’s three new interdisciplinary visual arts and academic facilities, located in Downtown Windsor, offer vital opportunities for partnerships in advancing the City’s ongoing revitalization strategies, while capitalizing on the iconic qualities of three landmark historic properties.

Through the detailed exploration of this downtown campus project, this session will explore the significant challenges and opportunities of adaptive reuse of heritage structures, highlighting key planning and architectural strategies and rationales. The participants will learn about the heritage impact assessment process, including the role of research, analysis, building assessment, and conservation and mitigation strategies. The context of municipal, owner and public considerations in the planning process for this project will be explored.  Through this session, participants will learn how to build on the relationship between contemporary aesthetics, historic preservation, and urban renewal, in the context of innovative heritage adaptive reuse projects.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Learn how to leverage heritage adaptive reuse as a catalyst for downtown revitalization.
  2. Learn innovative concepts for heritage conservation, conservation strategies, and unique issues and opportunities encountered in this project
  3. Learn how to build on the relationship between contemporary aesthetics, adaptive reuse, and historic preservation, in the design and context for the project
  4. Learn about the heritage impact assessment process, and municipal, owner and user considerations in the planning process.

Speakers:

Susan Spencer Lewin is a Principal at CS&P Architects. With over twenty years’ experience as a professional architect, her project experience and design background is extensive, with a continued focus on sustainable, accessible buildings and communities. Susan’s experience has typically included large urban projects often including complex reuse and adaption of existing heritage buildings. Recent projects include the Nelson Mandela School/Regent Park Community Centre, NTCI Redevelopment, and the University of Windsor downtown campus revitalization project. Susan has lectured extensively on her work and sustainable building and community design.

Susan is a Councillor for the Ontario Association of Architects, Chair of the OAA Sustainable Built Environment Committee, Past Chair of the CaGBC-GTC, Past Vice Chair of the Toronto Society of Architects, and is Faculty at the Institute without Boundaries, George Brown School of Design.

Scott Weir is a Principal at E.R.A. Architects Inc., and holds a post-professional Master’s degree in Architecture. Scott has been with the firm since 2000 and specializes in heritage conservation, with a particular interest in adaptive reuse, new design, heritage planning and advocacy for heritage buildings, cities and the built environment. An avid photographer, bibliophile and writer, his interest in cultural theory and North American urbanism has led to his work being published in a variety of architectural periodicals, including an award-winning column on architecture, urbanism and conservation for the National Post. He has been formally trained in Canada, Italy and the U.K. and he regularly guest lectures for various programs at the University of Toronto, York, Ryerson and Carleton Universities, as well as being a mentor at the College for Creative Studies in Detroit. Scott also enjoys getting his hands dirty on his own conservation and construction projects and harbors an obsession with his hometown, Detroit.

2:00 PM - 3:30 PM

36CE

Risk Assessment and Mitigation in a Heritage Context

1.5 ConEd Learning Hours

This session will also be offered Friday, May 9, 2014 4:00 PM - 5:30 PM

Course Outline

Heritage projects can present inherent risks that should be identified and addressed right from the initial planning phases. This session provides an overview of these potential risks – both internal and external – that exist at each stage of a project, as well as various mitigation strategies. We will analyze how different organizational structures can influence project objectives, decision-making principles, quality assurance/control, integration and effective communication. We will address the role of archival research and investigations: exploratory investigations, non-destructive analysis, materials’ testing and material procurement.  We will review when prequalification and unit price contracts are recommended. We will look at various protection methods and precautions that should be implemented during the construction. Finally, we ask ourselves, does the proposed works pose a risk to the very heritage fabric of the building?

Learning Objectives:

  1. To identify potential risks on heritage projects;
  2. To analyze and categorize these risks;
  3. To evaluate the potential mitigation measures;
  4. To track the identified risks and mitigation measures as the project evolves. 

Speaker:

DIMA COOK, Senior Associate at Fournier Gersovitz Moss Drolet et associés architectes, OAA, OAQ, LEED AP BD+C, RAIC, APT

Dima Cook joined Fournier Gersovitz Moss Drolet (FGMDA) in 1998, has been serving as Senior Associate since 2008 and was appointed manager of the Toronto branch office in 2012. For over 18 years, Dima has been honing her skills as Heritage Conservation architect, working on institutional projects, namely a Cultural Heritage Resource Assessment of the University of Toronto St. George campus; a Historic Structure Report of Old City Hall of Toronto; a Building Condition Assessment of Union Station Toronto which includes a 20-year State of Good Repair projection; accessibility upgrades of 11 armories, 7 of which are heritage buildings, for the Department of National Defense; and the restoration/rehabilitation of the historic Harbour Commissioners’ Building into a private club, the 357c, for Terra Incognito. Since 2009, Dima is the Heritage Project Architect of the $450M Union Station Revitalization project for NORR/City of Toronto, managing concept design, heritage approvals, contract document production and contract administration.  She is a member of the Sustainability sub-committee on climate change for APT (Association for Preservation Technology) and LEED AP BD+C-accredited. Ms. Cook’s knowledge of conservation and construction is well paired with her organizational skills to ensure efficient management of the projects under her supervision.

2:00 PM - 3:30 PM

37CE

Social Media or Prospecting Using the Internet

1.5 ConEd Learning hours

This course will also be offered on Wednesday, May 7, 2014 4:00 PM - 5:30 PM 

Course Outline 

Does your firm have a website? If so, what part does it play in your marketing efforts? Does your firm have a strategy to leverage the internet and social media tools to further your marketing and prospecting goals?

If you are like most architects in the real world, you feel overwhelmed when thinking about social media. Who has time to run an architectural practice, update and follow people on Twitter, and post to a Facebook page, in addition to face-to-face networking? The answer is few, if any. 

Fortunately, you don't need to be a social media maven to have real success. This presentation goes beyond social media, and focuses on a marketing framework that brings real, measurable results: attract more of the right kind of clients, get your firm recognition for the work it does, and nurture industry contacts. Focus on the avenues that bring results; forget the rest.

We'll look at two case studies of architecture firms that have leveraged the internet to get more of the right clients, and become recognized as subject matter experts. You will learn about the “internet marketing framework” and how this can compliment your existing marketing efforts. Finally, we will discuss ways that you can tailor this framework and apply it to your unique practice to help you achieve your marketing goals.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Understand the advantages and limitations of social media for architecture firms.
  2. Learn the elements of a successful architect's website.
  3. Learn how to define a clear set of marketing goals.
  4. Know how the internet can help you get more of the right clients with less effort.

Speakers:

Enoch Sears writes about marketing a small architecture firm and running a profitable architecture practice on his popular blog, BusinessofArchitecture. For the past 5 years he has studied how architecture firms can leverage internet tools such as social media to build a marketing platform that attracts the right kind of clients. Frequent topics on BusinessofArchitecture.com, include BIM tools, the architect's website, marketing for architects, and the practice archetype of architect as developer. He is the author of the book, Social Media for Architects.

In addition to BusinessofArchitecture.com, Enoch practices architecture in California as a licensed architect. He graduated from the College of Architecture, Art and Planning at Cornell University with a degree in architecture.

4:00 PM - 5:30 PM

38CE

Architectural Writing: Getting the Message Out

1.5 ConEd Learning Hours

This session is also offered Friday, May 9, 2014 8:30 AM 10:00 PM Friday, May 9, 2014 2:00 PM - 3:30 PM

Course Outline

There will be two sections:

(1) Writing in Aid of Design and (2) Writing to Express Architectural Thought. The writing audience is “external,” so ideas must be expressed clearly and simply. Creative writing skills play an important role. Attendees will be introduced to examples of both forms of architectural writing and will be given useful strategies to assist them in their own writing.

A. Design Writing: Includes design journals, project descriptions for publication, proposals, marketing, promotional and written design objectives. Writing clearly and succinctly makes our design ideas easier to organize and evaluate.  B. Architectural Thought: includes the above, as well as journal and newspaper articles. Effectively describing design intent and approach might make the difference in convincing a potential client to invest in a project, or not.
The presentation will answer the question: How can architects tap into their “inner writer”?

Speakers:

Gordon Grice, during his nearly 40 years as a freelance architectural illustrator, Gordon Grice has had the opportunity to work closely with a variety of clients and audiences around the world. He is a past president of the American Society of Architectural Illustrators (ASAI) and currently serves the organization as senior advisor and consultant for Architecture in Perspective, ASAI’s annual international illustration competition. Over the past 20 years, Gordon has been active as a writer and editor, having published more than two dozen books dealing with design and architectural illustration. Since 1997, he has had the privilege of editing the OAA quarterly journal OAA Perspectives and is currently co-editing an OAA 125th-anniversary retrospective, to be released in 2014. Gordon is also a creative advisor to Forrec Ltd. in Toronto, in which capacity he participates in art direction, creative writing, thematic development and the marketing of entertainment design services, internationally. Gordon is a member and regional chair of the College of Fellows of the Royal Architectural Institute of Canada.

Rebeca Damron is an Associate Pjennrofessor of English, Director of the Oklahoma State University Writing Center and Director of the Oklahoma State University Writing Project. She teaches courses in discourse analysis, writing center pedagogy, and environmental writing in the Rhetoric and Professional Writing Program at OSU. Her research has focused on interdisciplinary writing, which has included working on two National Science Foundation grants with engineers as well as writing in architecture. 

Tom Spector is a professor at the Oklahoma State University School of Architecture. He has been a registered architect since 1985 and holds an NCARB certificate, as well as registrations in both Georgia and California. He received a Ph.D. in architecture at the University of California at Berkeley, an M. Arch. from Georgia Tech and a B.S. in business administration from Florida State University. With Rebecca Damron, he coedited the landmark publication How Architects Write, in 2013.

4:00 PM- 5:30 PM

39CE

Integrating Curtain Wall Systems into Facades

1.5 ConEd Learning Hours

Course Outline

The design of contemporary building facades is reliant on high performance glazing systems to achieve not only the user requirements (daylighting, clear views, etc.), but also increasingly the stringent energy and environmental separation targets. This seminar will review curtain wall facades with an emphasis on the driving factors necessitating higher performance systems and related benefits and challenges. From the many considerations that will be discussed, the seminar will focus on interconnections between early design decisions such as glazing ratios and geometry, as they relate to thermal performance and energy code compliance (SB10). The presentation will also discuss unique applications such as integrated PV and various daylight control strategies.

Learning Objectives

  1. Review the basic parameters of a curtain wall system
  2. Understanding the implications of early design decisions on expected thermal performance / energy code compliance (SB10).
  3. Review curtain wall applications in high performance / sustainable design projects to achieve unique requirements such as integrated PV and specific daylight control strategies
  4. Review of practical solutions to achieve high performance glazing solutions and identification of pitfalls to avoid

Speaker:

Dave André, P.Eng., LEED Green Associate is a project manager / building science specialist at Morrison Hershfield. Morrison Hershfield is a multi-disciplinary engineering consulting firm providing services across Canada and the United States.  Dave holds a Bachelor of Applied Science in Civil Engineering from the University of Toronto and is a licensed professional engineer in the province of Ontario.  Dave has almost ten years of experience in building science ranging from building envelope failure investigation and rehabilitation, to design assistance and field review for new construction projects. Dave provides leadership to Morrison Hershfield’s facade engineering practice in the Greater Toronto Area and is very knowledgeable in the application of building envelope solutions at early design stages for high performance buildings.

4:00 PM- 5:30 PM

40CE

OBC – 2012 Part 9

1.5 ConEd Learning Hours

This session will also be offered Friday, May 9, 2014 10:30 AM - 12:00 PM

Course Outline

In this course, you will be introduced to changes included in the 2012 Ontario Building Code as they relate to Part 9 buildings.  This will include relevant material from Divisions A and C as well as Division B, Parts 1, 9, 11 and 12, with particular emphasis given to substantive changes to the building code as well as changes related to retirement homes, doors and windows, handrails and guards, foundation walls, and smoke alarms. The course will not cover myriad typographic or grammatical changes where the code intent remains the same.

Learning Objectives:

  1. To provide a basic awareness of the scope of changes incorporated within the 2012 Ontario Building Code;
  2. To provide a more thorough understanding of the most significant changes to requirements for buildings within the scope of Part 9 of the 2012 Ontario Building Code.

Speaker:

Liz Hilfrich is both a Professional Engineer and a Certified Building Code Official, with over 30 years of Building Code experience, including more than 20 years as a municipal Building Official, including 16 years as Chief Building Official for the City of Gloucester, and over 25 years as a facilitator of Ministry of Municipal Affairs and Housing Building Code and Act courses. Having qualifications in all design categories specified by the Building Code, Liz currently runs her own Building Code Consulting business, Hilfrich Inc., providing Code interpretation, analysis and review services to both private and public sector clients. In addition, she has been a member of Ontario’s Building Materials Evaluation Commission since 2004, and a part time teacher at Algonquin College facilitating building code courses since 2006.  Other related activities over the years have included membership on Algonquin College’s Fire protection and Safety Technician Program Advisory Committees and the Working Group to Establish the Home Inspection Certificate Program, and involvement on the executive and two conference host committees of the Golden Triangle Chapter for the Ontario Building Official’s Association.

4:00 PM- 5:30 PM

41CE

Protecting Heritage Elements during Demo/Construction

1.5 ConEd Learning Hours

This session will be offered Wednesday, May 7, 2014 4:00 PM -5:30 PM Thursday, May 8, 2014 10:30 AM - 12:00 PM 

Course Outline

Case study of measures undertaken to identify the risks to heritage building elements and provide appropriate protection procedures during major demolition and rehabilitation efforts at 180 Wellington, Ottawa.

  • Description of the overall abatement, demolition and seismic reinforcement scope
  • Description of heritage-defining components of the building
  • Discussion of various heritage materials, their defining characteristics and their vulnerabilities.
  • Discussion of particular challenges related to fine arts conservation
  • Establishing and implementing protective measures and procedures for architectural bronze and steel items, exterior stone cladding, interior marble finishes and ornamental glass tile ceiling mosaics
  • Monitoring and adapting demolition and construction methods while work is ongoing. 

Learning Objectives:

  1. Identifying risks to heritage building elements during a major demolition/rehabilitation project.
  2. Establishing the appropriate measures to mitigate the risks for each material and configuration.
  3. Understanding the challenges in documenting and implementing protective measures
  4. Establishing protocols for monitoring, maintaining, and adapting heritage protection materials and procedures during demolition/construction activities

Speaker:

Eric Stein, OAQ, APT Senior Associate

Eric Stein received his Bachelor of Architecture from McGill University in Montreal. He joined FGMDA in 2001 and was appointed one of its associates in 2009. He has over 22 years of experience in his field. 

Mr. Stein has worked as Project Architect on medium to large scale commercial and institutional projects, many of which are heritage conservation projects. He is well-versed in conceptual work and in all areas of project management, including costing, scheduling, quality assurance/control and contract administration. He is also proficient in the integration and automation of the production of computerized drawings. 

Heritage conservation projects have included rehabilitation of the Wellington building in Ottawa and of the St. Thomas Consolidated Courthouse in  Ontario; restoration and interior design of Montreal’s FACE school auditorium; restoration of the Mappin Wing façade at Rideau Hall in Ottawa; elaboration of protective scaffolding measures in view of important restoration works on Parliament Hill’s West Block in Ottawa; masonry and roof restoration of the Beaconsfield Yacht Club; and restoration of the façade of the Montreal Herald.

Mr. Stein has also collaborated in the design of the Dorshei Emet Congregation Synagogue in Hampstead, Quebec, and of two private residences in the Quebec Laurentians; as well as in the roof restoration of Le Château Apartments in downtown Montreal.

Prior to FGMDA, Eric participated in a wide range of projects in the Greater Montreal area : design and construction of the UQAM’s President Kennedy Wing and rehabilitation of their Sherbrooke Wing; design of the La Petite Bourgogne Sports Centre; design and construction of the Notre-Dame Street viaduct;  a major addition tothe Palais des Congrès de Montreal; restoration of historic Saint-Stanislas-de-Kotska bell towers; and several other modifications brought to the St-Laurent and Ahuntsic CEGEPs.

Eric is a valued member of FGMDA’s Information Technologies Committee that plans and manages the company’s  IT needs in view of keeping FGMDA professionals—and their work—at the edge of new technologies.

8:30 AM - 11:00 AM

04T

Canadian Centre for Architecture

2.5 Unstructured Learning Hours

Discover the Canadian Centre for Architecture, its resources and spaces! The CCA building and gardens have become landmarks of Montréal. Opened in 1989, the new building designed by Peter Rose with Phyllis Lambert, consulting architect, and Erol Argun, associate architect, was integrated with the historically classified Shaughnessy House (1874) designed by William T. Thomas. Its landscape includes the CCA Sculpture Garden designed by Montreal artist-architect Melvin Charney. Included in this CCA visit of the building, archive and garden will be a special guided tour of the current exhibition Photographing the Arab city in the 19th Century given by the Curatorial Coordinator.

8:30 AM - 11:00 AM

05T

Marguerite-Bourgeoys Museum/Notre-Dame-de-Bon-Secours Chapel

3 Unstructured Learning Hours

This 300-year-old chapel and the very captivating history museum connected to it will amaze you. In the company of a guide, you will learn about the truly exceptional life of a woman of action, Marguerite Bourgeoys, and about the early settlers who built Montreal. Visiting the many exhibition rooms will lead you from the stone crypt to the very top of the tower where a spectacular view of Old Montreal and the Old Port awaits you.

Also, visit the archaeological site located under the chapel and discover a place few visitors have the chance to see. Accompanied by a guide, you will travel through 2400 years of a fascinating history, beginning with the occupation of the site by the Native Peoples and continuing through the period of the devastating 18th-century fire to the present time.

8:30 AM - 10:30 AM

06T

Saint Joseph's Oratory of Mount Royal

2 Unstructured Learning Hours

Learn about the largest shrine in the world dedicated to Saint Joseph and the history of its founder. Proceed around the site from the carillon to the basilica, through the Votive Chapel, the Tomb of Saint Brother André, the Crypt Church, the Concourse, the display of Brother André and the original Chapel. There is more than 100 years of history, culture and developments -- it is a jewel of Montreal’s heritage.

 

 

2:00 PM - 4:30 PM

07T

Griffintown

2 Unstructured Learning Hours

One of Montreal’s oldest working-class neighbourhoods and originally home to the city’s Irish community who worked in the industries along the Lachine Canal, the area was decimated in the 1970s. Forgotten for decades, it is enjoying new-found favour with Montrealers, artists and developers alike as a series of projects – both large-scale and small – are now under construction. Striking the balance between conserving the vestiges of the neighbourhood and new construction, between private and public space is proving to be challenging. Among the buildings that will be included are the Dow Brewery Complex and John Ostell’s 1861 New City Gas Building.

This is an architectural walking tour, presented rain or shine. The tour will be offered in English by Heritage Montreal volunteer guides, who have backgrounds in architecture, art history, architectural education or urban planning.

2:00 PM to 4:30 PM

08T

Montreal Museum of Archaeology and History (Pointe-À-Callière)

2 Unstructured Learning Hours

Pointe-à-Callière, a recognized national historical and archaeological site, leads visitors through centuries of history, from the times when Natives camped there to the present day. The Museum opened in 1992, the result of over 10 years of digs. It showcases major archaeological discoveries made on this site starting in the 1980s. Set on a site bearing evidence of over 1,000 years of human activities and on the very birthplace of Montréal, Pointe-à-Callière houses and protects remarkable archaeological remains, displayed in situ with absolute respect for their integrity.       
          
There will also be an architectural component to this tour where you will explore the vision behind the construction of the main buildings of the museum.

2:00 PM to 4:30 PM

09T

Old Montreal featuring Grand Tour Notre-Dame Basilica

This event is sold out.

2.5 Unstructured Learning Hours

This tour is being offered again on Friday, May 8, 2014 at 8:30 am.

On the edge of Old Montreal you will discover the International Quarter, the new urban space that links the old city to downtown.  Over there, you'll stop to admire an authentic Paris metro entrance, the hot pink "Lipstick Forest" of the Palais des congrès, and the exciting blend of architectural styles housed in the Montréal World Trade Centre. A visit in Old Montréal will help you  discover the 300-plus years of architecture:  St-Helene’s street,  Place d'Armes. Cours Le Royer, Place Jacques Cartier, Bonsecours and St-Paul Streets are good examples of all that variety.  You will visit inside Notre-Dame Basilica, the neo-Gothic masterpiece designed by the Irish-American architect James O'Donnell inspired by St-Luke’s Church in Chelsea.

 

5:30 PM - 7:00 PM

Alumni Events

University of Waterloo Alumni Reception

Fairmont The Queen Elizabeth (Les Voyageurs 2), 900 Boul. Rene-Levesque Ouest, Montreal, QC
Complimentary
Clck here for Registration and more information.

12:00 PM - 1:45 PM

Keynote Speaker Luncheon featuring Phyllis Lambert

Phyllis Lambert will introduce “Heritage Architect Inspiration" as our Keynote Speaker.

Architect, photographer, lecturer, historian and critic of architecture and urbanism, Phyllis Lambert is Founding Director Emeritus of the Canadian Centre for Architecture (CCA) in Montreal. Lambert first made architectural history as the Director of Planning of the Seagram Building in New York (1954-58). She is recognized internationally for her contribution in advancing contemporary architecture, together with for her concern for the social issues of urban conservation and the role of architecture in the public realm. Lambert’s publications include pioneering works on photography and on leading architects, as well as critical texts on cities and essays in numerous journals.  Recently published, her book Building Seagram is a personal and at the same time deeply researched cultural history of architecture, art, urban regulations and real estate, as well as conservation and stewardship in New York City.