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OAA Annual Conference 2014

Friday May 09 2014 - FAIRMONT THE QUEEN ELIZABETH, MONTREAL

OAA Conference 2012

Conference Program



Friday May 09 2014

Registration: 7:30 AM to 6:30 PM
Continental Breakfast: 7:30 AM - 9:00 AM
Refreshment Breaks: Morning 10:00 AM - 10:30 AM,
Afternoon 3:30 PM - 4:00 PM
Sponsor Displays: 8:00 AM - 5:00 PM

8:30 AM - 12:00 PM

06AC

Ontario Building Code: Concepts and Code Analysis

3 ConEd Learning Hours

Presenters

Deborah Levine Farrow
, Architect, OAA, FRAIC
Vice President, Farrow Dreessen Architects Inc.

Course Outline

Knowledge of Ontario Building Code (BC) is fundamental to the successful realization of every architectural project.  This course will review the content of the Building Code, key building code concepts, and will include a detailed code analysis of a dual occupancy building.  

Course Objectives 

  • To describe the structure and the key content of the Ontario Building Code;
  • To perform complete building code analysis for a simple new building regulated under Part 3;
  • To navigate through the Ontario Building Code.

2:00 PM - 5:30 PM

07AC

Bid Theory

3 ConEd Learning Hours

Presenter

Michael R. Swartz, Partner,WeirFoulds LLP 

Course Outline

This session will review the legal framework in which construction bidding – and other forms of procurement – are carried on. This session will also review a set of Instructions to Bidders in an effort to demonstrate how theory and practice merge. The rationale for various clauses in the Instructions to Bidders will be explained.

Part 1: Introducing Contract A: “The Bidding Contract”

Bid Theory/Development of the Bidding Contract

  • Glossary of Terms
  • What’s a Contract?
  • Old Fashioned Bidding
  • The “Big Bang”: The Birth of Contract A
  • Contract A for Owners/Contractors
  • The Architect’s Responsibilities
  • Broader Public Sector Bidding/Procurement

Part 2: Instructions to Bidders/Building the Bidding Contract

  • How to Approach Bid Documents
  • Contract A: or not?
  • Sample Instructions to Bidders
  • Review of clauses
  • Some troublesome issues
  • Broader Public Sector requirements

8:30 AM - 5:30 PM

42CE

Freehand Sketching for Architects: One-day immersion

This session is sold out.

6 ConEd Learning Hours

Course Outline

Over a full day session, with practical instruction and coaching from the course leaders, participants will learn several different freehand sketching techniques, one by one, each at a different location: thumbnail sketches, contour lines, contrast/value, perspective and speed sketching.  At the end of the day, each participant will pull together what he or she has learned in a final sketch.

The sketching will focus on several nearby historic Montreal buildings – outdoor and/or indoor locations depending on the weather.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Learn or improve upon the following freehand sketching skills and techniques: contour lines, value and contrast, composition, and one point and two point perspective.
  2. Improve your ability to document and remember the existing built environment.
  3. Improve your ability to use freehand sketching as an architectural design tool.
  4. Learn how to draw faster and with more confidence

Click here for The Joy of Sketch PDF document. 

Presenters:

Joel Berman, LEED-AP, is the founder and president of Joel Berman Architecture & Design, Ltd., a Chicago architecture firm specializing in inner city adaptive reuse and heritage restoration for restaurant, hospitality, institutional and residential development. Project work includes an award winning historic preservation renovation of a 1920s White Castle Hamburger building, and conversion of a 1906 Chicago fire station into a major video production facility.   

For Joel, clear and fast sketching has been a factor in the success of his design work and architectural practice.  

In addition to running a successful practice, Joel has taught architectural sketching at the Art Institute of Chicago (1997), Columbia College School of Interior Architecture (1997-2004), the Chicago Architectural Foundation Adult Education Program (2005-2011), and for the United States National Endowment for the Humanities/Chicago Architecture Foundation Urban Gateways Program (2009-2013)

Anne Milchberg is a registered architect and registered urban planner in private practice in Toronto with over three decades of specialized, successful experience in both the public and private sectors, and a stint teaching planning at the graduate level at the University of Toronto.

Anne’s strength and focus is on strategic planning for large scale, complex real estate development projects and land portfolios.  Most recently, Anne completed a review of the City of Toronto’s portfolio of 5,600+ properties, led the City’s study to consolidate and rationalize around 100 City works yards, conducted a master planning exercise for three massive properties in Etobicoke, and led the $75 million mixed use St. Lawrence Market North building project.  

For Anne, fast and clear sketching was her ticket into architecture and teaching, and an advantage in urban planning and design work. In her career, it has always been an effective and fun way to communicate or explore the viability of an idea, analyze a space, or focus a business negotiation.

8:30 AM - 12:00 PM

43CE

Delivering Commercial Passivhaus Projects

3 ConEd Learning Hours

This session is also offered Wednesday, May 7, 2014, 2:00 PM - 5:30 PM AND Thursday, May 8, 2014 8:30 AM - 12:00 PM 

Course Outline 

The opportunity to create commercial Passivhaus projects in the North America is wide open. Unfortunately, there is little information available to the designer to guide them in the design and implementation of commercial Passivhaus design.  Also, much of what is available is written to European standards which differ in some significant ways from North American design standards.

This presentation will detail the basics of commercial Passivhaus design, the potential challenges that must be overcome and inherent opportunities to create exceptional projects. Recent built examples of the first North American Passivhaus projects will also be presented.

Learning Objectives

  1. Describe the basics of Passivhaus means and methods
  2. Describe the differences between residential and commercial Passivhaus
  3. Describe the three categories of Passivhaus buildings and their specific application
  4. Describe potential synergies available to the designer in high performance buildings

Speakers

Adam Cohen
As an active design/builder and green building expert, Adam Cohen is a leading North American Passivhaus practitioner whose innovative work on commercial high performance building has made his expertise sought-after for projects across North America. He is a principal partner in Structures Design/Build, LLC (www.structuresdb.com), Passiv Structures, LLC (www.passivscience.com) and Quantum Architects, LLC, (www.quantum-architects.com). 

Mr. Cohen is recognized as a national leader in the Passivhaus movement and has presented technical papers at both national and international Passivhaus conferences. His leadership in commercial Passivhaus design has made him a sought after speaker, consultant and teacher of advanced courses in Passivhaus ultra-low energy design. 

8:30 AM - 12:00 PM

44CE

Design Fee Psychology & Design Fee Negotiation

3 ConEd Learning Hours

Part 1 - Design Fee Psychology

Although many of us believe that we make financial decisions based on rational financial criteria, this is seldom the case. This presentation introduces 5 key concepts from the field of Behavioral Finance to demonstrate why your clients make the financial decisions they make and the crucial role that emotions play in the design fee proposal and negotiation process. Key Concepts:

  • Concept 1: Power of Presentation
  • Concept 2: Anchoring and Adjustment
  • Concept 3: Mental Accounting
  • Concept 4: Reward + Punishment (Introduction to ‘Prospect Theory’)
  • Concept 5: Losses + Gains (Introduction to ‘Hedonic Framing’)

Part 2 - Design Fee Negotiation

When negotiating design fees many of us believe that reducing our fee is the only way to win new work and resolve conflict. During this presentation we demonstrate a better way to negotiate by showing participants how to respond to the 7 most common ‘tactics and tricks’ used against design professionals to force fee reductions during the fee proposal and negotiation process. Key Concepts:

  • Preconditioning/Hot Potato
  • Negotiating Against Yourself
  • Good Cop, Bad Cop
  • Splitting the Difference
  • The Power of Silence
  • Body Language
  • The Nibble
  • The Strategies of Principled Negotiation

Speakers:

Alexandra Howieson studied Architecture at the University of Sydney where she received awards and scholarships for her achievements in Architectural Science, Architectural Design, Urban Design and Planning and overall academic performance. After graduation, Alex moved to London to accept a sponsored position with Foster + Partners where she was instrumental in the design and documentation of several key projects in Asia and the Middle East. Alexandra is a Registered Architect in NSW, Australia and has presented on the subjects of behavioural finance and pricing strategies for the Australian Institute of Architects (AIA), the New Zealand Institute of Architects (NZIA), Emerging Architects Network (DARCH), the Building Designers Association (BDA) and many private companies. Alex has also been a panelist for the Design Institute of Australia’s DIAlogues series discussing Free-Bidding and Undercutting.

Ian Motley graduated from university in the UK with a BSc in Building Science [Project Management]. Prior to starting Blue Turtle Consulting, Ian was an Associate Partner with Foster + Partners firm of Architects in London, where he was responsible for proposing and negotiating design fees and appointment terms and conditions for many of Foster + Partners’ new design projects around the world. Before joining Foster + Partners, Ian worked in the United States managing commercial, residential and industrial projects throughout the country. Ian has also worked on development projects in Spain and Honduras where he learnt to read, write and speak Spanish. Ian has been a guest speaker at design fee negotiation presentations held by design institutes and private companies around the world. Ian has also written and published a series of guides on the subjects of architectural fees, appointments and negotiations.

8:30 AM - 12:00 PM

45CE

New Accessibility Changes to the Building Code

3 ConEd Learning hours

This session is also offered Friday, May 9, 214 2:00 PM - 5:30 PM

This session will outline the accessibility amendments made to the 2012 Building Code by Ontario Regulation 368/13.

These amendments will come into effect on January 1, 2015 and will have a significant impact on building design and construction in Ontario.  This session will include an in-depth review of the following revised requirements:

  • Barrier-Free Pedestrian Entrances
  • Power Door Operators
  • Barrier-Free Access to All Other Floor Areas
  • Barrier-Free Path Dimensions
  • Visitable Suites in Apartment Buildings
  • Hotels and Motels
  • Emergency Power
  • Visual Smoke Alarms
  • Visual Signal Devices for Fire Alarm and Detection Systems
  • Universal Toilet Rooms and Other Washrooms
  • Access to Pools and Spas
  • Adaptable Seating
  • Renovations

This session will focus on new requirements and participants are expected to have a basic understanding of the accessibility requirements of the current Ontario Building Code. Links to on-line resources, such as a line-by-line annotated version of the changes will be provided.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Understand how the accessibility amendments to the Building Code were developed;
  2. Understand the nature of the accessibility amendments;
  3. Understand how the technical changes will affect building design in Ontario;

Speaker:

 Alek Antoniuk, B.E.S., B. Arch., OAA

Alek Antoniuk was the Manager of the code development team that developed these accessibility amendments. Alek Antoniuk has over 34 years of experience in building code development and design and is a recognized expert in the development of construction codes in Canada.  Although he is best known for co-ordinating and managing the technical development of the 2006 and the 2012 editions of the Ontario Building Code, he played a lead role in managing the code advisory services of the Ontario Ministry of Municipal Affairs and Housing since 1989.  He was the principal of his own architectural design practice for 5 years and the deputy chief building official for the former Borough of East York (now City of Toronto) for 5 years.  Alek Antoniuk is a member of the OAA and holds an Ontario BCIN for all OBC categories of qualifications.

8:30 AM - 12:00 PM

46CE

Manipulating & Harnessing the Microclimate

3 ConEd Learning hours

This session is also offered Friday, May 9, 214 2:00 PM - 5:30 PM

Course Outline

The purpose of this seminar will be to describe strategies and processes to design and harness the microclimate (e.g. wind, solar, rain, temperature, etc.) around buildings. The objective of harnessing the microclimate is to maximise the perception of acceptable thermal comfort experienced by pedestrians and residents and to increase the viability of natural ventilation within the building units. During the course of the presentation the tools, and means to score “success” for both natural ventilation and thermal comfort, will be discussed. Other microclimate features such as rain penetration, solar impacts (e.g. glare), noise and odour will also be addressed.

By definition, the construction of a building creates a microclimate that is associated with the presence of the building itself. In the development of a masterplan, the combination of buildings can create a larger microclimate which impacts the local wind, solar and other climate parameters including heat island. Given that the process of design involves a series of decisions, a design team can choose to design the microclimate too. The decisions can lead to increased natural ventilation and thermal comfort, or reductions in the viability of both. The microclimate is often defined as simply the wind. This undersells the potential of the building as the microclimate involves odour, wind, noise, glare, shade and other aspects of climate.

The presentation will discuss manipulation of a microclimate for a variety of parameters focussing on overall comfort (wind and thermal) for masterplans in a variety of regions. We will also address means to describe the interaction between the outside and inside of the building.

Learning Objective

  1. To understand the different options by which one describes and quantifies wind and thermal comfort - the different indices, the variables within them, the benefits and drawbacks - focus will be on the thermal aspects of outdoor comfort.
  2. To understand the methods, and their limitations, to model and predict thermal comfort parameters (eg wind, temperature, mean radiant temperature) within the urban environment so that spaces can be scored. This will include local heat island impacts.
  3. To identify means to improve thermal comfort within the public realm using different massing, building adjacencies and topologies, etc. to manipulate wind and shade and how one can scoring described in 1) and 2) to evaluate solutions.
  4. To diagnose different examples from around the world - what works and what doesn't - using real examples in different climates.

Speakers

Goncalo Pedro, has a PhD in mechanical engineering in computational fluid dynamics from the University of Victoria. At RWDI, he provides specialist expertise in microclimate analysis with a focus on master planning, sustainability and ventilation. Goncalo has worked on a variety of projects such as Beijing Central Business District Master plan. Mecca and the King Abdullah City for Atomic and Renewable Energy by helping to assess the potential for passive and active sustainability measures in challenging climates.

John Alberico is a Project Director specializing in air quality and microclimate assessments. He joined RWDI in 1988, and became a Principal in 2004.  He is a Canadian Certified Environmental Professional.

As a Project Director, he provides overall technical direction to engineering teams on air quality and microclimate projects ensuring that a high level of service is provided and RWDI’s interests are preserved on all projects.

John’s area of technical expertise is in exhaust and dust dispersion, and wind flow around buildings, which has included involvement in several hundred projects providing expert consultation, and conducting both numerical and wind tunnel modelling. His primary focus has been in the institutional, healthcare, higher education and pharmaceutical sectors.  His involvement in many of these projects has included environmental impact assessments and Certificates of Approval in Ontario.

John has also managed engineering teams that have provided air quality, odour, dust, ventilation, noise, acoustic and vibration assessments for a broad range of applications on local, national and international projects. These have included pits and quarries, landfills, composting facilities, roadways, residential developments, and industrial facilities in addition to healthcare, higher education and pharmaceutical facilities.

8:30 AM - 12:00 PM

47CE

Make Great Digital Photos of Heritage Sites and Restorations

3 ConEd Learning hours

This session is also offered Thursday, May 8, 2014 2:00 PM - 5:30 PM

Course Outline

The past exists mainly in memory. After memory, we have photographs. Buildings do not last forever: Some disappear completely, and some are preserved in part through re-imaging and skillful renovation. High quality digital architectural photography is the most accurate and reliable tool for documenting and preserving heritage buildings. In addition, competent digital photography can provide a pristine, reliable record of current architectural undertakings - some of which will become the ‘heritage’ buildings of the future. To do all this well one needs a working understanding of today’s digital imaging hardware and software. But one must also know how to archive and preserve the digital information for the benefit of future generations. This workshop will expose serious architectural practitioners to the aesthetic and technical possibilities of high-end digital architectural photography in a way that will be useful for documentary, display, marketing, and archival purposes. 

Learning Objectives:

  1. Participants will learn how best to use digital photography to document heritage buildings and restoration
  2. Participants will learn to select the most useful digital cameras, lenses, and computer tools for this work.
  3. Participants will learn to appreciate the range and power of Photoshop enhancement and corrections.
  4. Participants will learn how to preserve and protect high-resolution digital images for archival purposes. 

Speaker:

Gerry Kopelow is an internationally published author, teacher and training professional. His writing and photography have appeared in many periodicals and magazines. His textbooks on photography are distributed world-wide and are respected as definitive works in the field. He has lectured and delivered workshops for a wide variety of groups and institutions, including The University of Florida, The Georgia Institution of Technology, The Pratt Institute, The Cooper Union, The University of Manitoba and the American Institute of Architects. 

He has lectured at the Harvard graduate School of design, where he was invited to establish a Continuing Education professional development program for architects, Gerry has also consulted for Canon USA in relation to photography education. Gerry has taught at RAIC National Conferences and OAA Annual Conferences for a number of years.

8:30 AM - 12:00 PM

48CE

Beyond Design: Turning a Place Around

3 ConEd Learning hours

This session is also offered Thursday, May 8, 2014 8:30 AM - 12:00 PM

Course Outline

Revitalizing public places is a perennial challenge. We have all seen examples of grand revitalization schemes which focused on the latest design trends, and a generation later, the community needs a new strategy in order to “turn a place around”. The social and economic fabrics are fragile, woven over time into the unique character of each community. We must look beyond the architecture and design features to support the people engaged in helping their communities thrive.

This workshop will consider:

  • How is the community considered within a revitalization project?
  • Who leads these initiatives in challenging economic times?
  • How does the management of public places benefit from partnerships and creative collaborations to address the social, economic and environmental issues of the day?
  • As architects and designers you have a vital role to play as stewards of the public realm—how will you turn places around in your communities?

This session will challenge architects to examine how revitalization needs to re-consider the roles of the public, private and non-profit sectors and how unlikely partnerships are breathing new life into older places. It will include selected examples of revitalization projects from a variety of Canadian communities.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Gain a wider appreciation of revitalization and its role in community-building
  2. Discover how heritage conservation extends beyond the design of an individual buildings
  3. Understand four key aspects of revitalization which complement the architectural design of a “place”
  4. Identify public, private and non-profit partnership models for the stewardship of urban places

Speaker:

Judy Oberlander, Principal, and Associates Inc., specializes in the design of educational programs, conservation and fundraising strategies for governments, foundations and non-profit organizations.   Over the past 30 years she has worked in the public, private and non-profit sectors in Ottawa and Vancouver including heritage conservation projects in many parts of Canada.  She received her Master’s degree in Historic Preservation from the School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation at Columbia University and a Certificate in Fundraising from NYU.  In addition to her consulting practice, she currently teaches heritage conservation and urban revitalization courses. Her work has been recognized with two national continuing education awards and three City of Vancouver Heritage Awards. 

She established her firm in 1989 after working in Ottawa for the Heritage Canada Foundation and Commonwealth Historic Resource Management Ltd. Her recent clients include the North Vancouver Museum; Yukon Government; Willowbank School of Restoration Arts; Vancouver Foundation; the Vancouver Heritage Foundation; Osoyoos & District Museum and Archives; The Dr. Sun Yat-Sen Chinese Garden; the Heritage Legacy Fund of British Columbia; Canada Green Building Council and the BC Provincial Government among others. She has worked extensively with local governments for whom she and her team created heritage conservation strategies, interpretation, education and public awareness programs. Between1990-2002 she consulted to The Samuel and Saidye Bronfman Family Foundation in Montreal on the design of their Urban Issues Program and conducted site visits in communities across Canada. 

From 1993 to 2005 she was the founding Director of the City Program at Simon Fraser University in downtown Vancouver. There she created award-winning mid-career continuing education programs on a wide range of urban issues including professional development courses, free public lectures, and designed a nationally recognized Certificate in Urban Design. In addition she actively raised funds to create the $1.5 million City Program Endowment Fund as well as over $510,000 through dozens of grants and sponsorships to support curriculum design, publications, student bursaries and free public lectures. In the first 12 years of the City Program, 23,000 people participated in the courses, lectures and special events in both Vancouver and Calgary.

Since 1986 she has taught intensive mid-career courses in cultural resource management at the University of Victoria. Her course, “Fundraising Strategies: Sustaining Arts, Culture, Museum and Heritage Organizations” for the Heritage Canada Foundation in Montreal in 2012; in Ottawa in 2013 will be offered in Charlottetown in 2014.   She co-teaches “Urban Design: Urban Revitalization” with Alastair Kerr in the SFU City Program (Vancouver 2008, 2011, 2014, Edmonton 2009).  She was the curriculum designer and continues to teach in the Vancouver Heritage Foundation’s education program, Old School: Courses for Building Conservation which is recognized by five professional associations, including the AIBC, as part of continuing education and also welcomes members of the public in a unique learning environment.

Civic engagement is important to Judy--she has served on the numerous boards including—The Leon and Thea Koerner Foundation, Pacific Parkinson’s Research Institute, Jewish Federation, Association for Preservation Technology, ICOMOS Canada and civic boards including  the City of Vancouver Development Permit Board Advisory Panel, Vancouver City Planning Commission and the Ottawa Local Architectural Conservation Advisory Committee.  In 2009 she completed the Institute for Corporate Directors’ Governance Essentials Program for Directors of Not-for-Profit Organizations.

8:30 AM - 12:00 PM

49CE

Architectural Programming

3 ConEd Learning hours

This session is also offered Friday, May 9, 2014 2:00 PM - 5:30 PM

Course Outline

“Programming is the first creative act of a project”

In this course we will look at the various ways a space program is developed which includes examining how to develop a program based on an Owner’s list of requirements and what to do when an Owner gives you a space program.   This will be illustrated using institutional building types which will include education, recreation and justice facilities.   We will review the difference between a Performance Based Statement of Requirements and a Prescriptive Based Statement of Requirements. We will look at various tools to communicate the program so that informative decisions can be made by the Owner.  There will be an interactive component which will allow participants to partake in a program preparation exercise.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Understand how to develop a program based on the owner requirements and needs.  Review the different steps in developing a Needs Assessment and a space program.
  2. Understand how to review and analyze an owner’s space program and determine if it aligns with the appropriate standards and the project budget.
  3. Review the difference between a Performance Based Statement of Requirements and a Prescriptive Based Statement of Requirements.
  4. Understand how to use a space program as a tool that can be applied at all stages of the design and construction process.
  5. Review the use of various diagrams to communicate the written program to the Owner/users.

Speaker:

Maureen O’Shaughnessy- Principal
B.ES., B.Arch., OAA, FRAIC, REFP 

Maureen O’Shaughnessy is one of the country’s leading experts on educational planning and design. A Recognized Educational Facility Professional (REFP) and an active member of the Council of Educational Facilities Planners International (CEFPI), Maureen imparts to the firm her particular expertise in the provision of planning, programming and design for educational clients and she has worked diligently to help direct and expand the firm’s strength in this sector.  To date, CS&P has been responsible for the design of over 350 educational and instructional facilities including childcare facilities, elementary schools, high schools, independent schools, colleges and universities. These projects typically involve extensive user group consultation and Maureen has been particularly successful in working closely with these large multi-faceted client groups to gain their consensus and support. 

Maureen has advised school boards across Canada on educational facility issues including long range board-wide facility planning, new school models for the delivery of 21st Century Learning, and program renewal for existing schools. 

As part of her commitment to providing quality education and learning environments across the world, Maureen sits on the Board of Directors for the Schools for the Children of the World (SCW) Canada, developing partnerships to build schools in remote communities in Honduras and Haiti. Maureen is a Principal with CS&P Architects and was elected as a Fellow to the Royal Architectural Institute of Canada in 2013.

Peter Ortved, Principal
B.Arch., OAA, SAA, FRAIC

A Principal of CS&P Architects, Peter has over 35 years of experience as a practicing architect.  After receiving his Bachelor of Architecture degree from the University of Toronto, he joined CS&P in 1972. As one of the firm’s corporate directors, Peter assumes primary responsibility for project development and has spearheaded many of CS&P’s most significant civic, municipal and recreational projects. 

Peter has exceptional knowledge of professional practice, the construction industry, and urban design issues.  He has been a board member for several community organizations and served as a Professional Advisor for national and international architectural design competitions. Recently, he was a Juror for the St. Lawrence Market North Building Design Competition for the City of Toronto. Currently, he is the Team Leader for the New Saskatoon Police Service Headquarters. He is a member of the Ontario Association of Architects and a Fellow of the Royal Architectural Institute of Canada.

Anna Cascioli
, Senior Associate
B.Arch., OAA, SAA, MRAIC

Since graduating from the University of Toronto in 1997, Anna has gained experience as a project architect and designer for a wide variety of building types. She has worked extensively for institutional clients including several Police Facilities, School Boards, Recreation Centres, and Long Term Care clients. 

Anna brings to the team strong leadership and communication skills which are invaluable to the smooth delivery of complex projects with multidisciplinary consulting teams. Anna was the Project Architect on the Planning, Design and Compliance team for the Ontario Provincial Police Modernization Project, and recently completed a comprehensive programming study for the Regina Police Facilities Renewal Program. Her experience in planning and programming for police facilities also includes work for the Saskatoon Police Service and the Guelph Police Service. 

8:30 AM - 10:00 AM

50CE

Architects and Mandatory Condominium Reserve Fund Studies

1.5 ConEd Learning Hours 

This session will also be offered Thursday, May 8, 2014, 2:00 PM - 3:30 PM

Course Outline

Reserve fund studies for Residential Condominiums, are mandated by law, to be done in the 1st year of occupancy, and every 3rd year after that. The reserve fund study is commissioned by the agents or Condominium owners of the building. The study uses a protocol that is normally not intrusive but relies on the professional experience and techniques that architects already use in preparing contract documents, coordinating consultants, and performing field reviews of construction. This session puts together opportunity, profitability, client service delivery requirements and the methodology of conducting and reporting the study.

Reserve fund studies have the purpose of identifying the scope of items to maintain the quality of the building stock over a 30 year horizon. The funds to identify the items and implement the maintenance are budgeted and reserved by condominium owners to facilitate resident enjoyment and safety. The building appearance is part of the neighborhood pride that Ontario wants to maintain over that period. The study analyses the items, building systems, assemblies and finishes that have to be maintained to the initial design standard of the building. The objective:  to investigate and state the condition of all the items and indicate the frequency for their maintenance or replacement, and further provide the periodic cost expenditure that is associated in a professionally compiled report document. This report forms part of the decision making protocol for investment analysis and maintenance of the building.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Ontario’s  rationale for Reserve Fund Studies;
  2. Client groups requiring Condominium Reserve Fund Studies;
  3. The architects’ rationale for and competition in doing Reserve Fund Studies;
  4. Overview of Risk Management and Insurance for Reserve Fund Studies;
  5. Overview of Reserve Fund Study Template and Building Condition Reports.

Speaker:

Paul Hastings is a practicing architect with his own firm in Oakville, prior to joining Public Works and Government Services Canada. He has been a Vice President of the OAA where his term ended Dec.31.2013. He has founded and coordinated the Small Practice Information Forum, SPIF, for architects where many shared challenges were discussed and solutions formulated for practice viability. He has published a well-received article in Perspectives Magazine, the Sole Practitioner: Part 1, and has given presentations on the Future of Architecture to various groups. With a background in Engineering, Environmental Design Studies and Architecture, he has used his multidisciplinary training to complete many projects and recently achieved Green Globes 4 on a renovation project, surpassing the Green Globes 3 client requirement. Paul has been involved with Ryerson University Department of Architecture as the OAA liaison on the Program Advisory Committee and provided assistance thru Council to remove road blocks in the recording of intern experience. He was the Chair of the Discipline Committee for years, and was active on various other OAA committees as well. The cumulative experience has provided a unique opportunity to gain an in-depth look into the practice and business of architecture and see great opportunity for the profession in a variety of areas.

8:30 AM - 10:00 AM

51CE

Architectural Writing: Getting the Message Out

1.5 ConEd Learning Hours

This session will also be offered Thursday, May 8, 2014 4:00 PM – 5:30 PM AND Friday, May 9, 2014 2:00 PM – 3:30 PM

Course Outline

There will be two sections:

(1) Writing in Aid of Design and (2) Writing to Express Architectural Thought. The writing audience is “external,” so ideas must be expressed clearly and simply. Creative writing skills play an important role. Attendees will be introduced to examples of both forms of architectural writing and will be given useful strategies to assist them in their own writing.

A. Design Writing: Includes design journals, project descriptions for publication, proposals, marketing, promotional and written design objectives. Writing clearly and succinctly makes our design ideas easier to organize and evaluate.  B. Architectural Thought: includes the above, as well as journal and newspaper articles. Effectively describing design intent and approach might make the difference in convincing a potential client to invest in a project, or not.
The presentation will answer the question: How can architects tap into their “inner writer”?

Speakers:

Gordon Grice, during his nearly 40 years as a freelance architectural illustrator, Gordon Grice has had the opportunity to work closely with a variety of clients and audiences around the world. He is a past president of the American Society of Architectural Illustrators (ASAI) and currently serves the organization as senior advisor and consultant for Architecture in Perspective, ASAI’s annual international illustration competition. Over the past 20 years, Gordon has been active as a writer and editor, having published more than two dozen books dealing with design and architectural illustration. Since 1997, he has had the privilege of editing the OAA quarterly journal OAA Perspectives and is currently co-editing an OAA 125th-anniversary retrospective, to be released in 2014. Gordon is also a creative advisor to Forrec Ltd. in Toronto, in which capacity he participates in art direction, creative writing, thematic development and the marketing of entertainment design services, internationally. Gordon is a member and regional chair of the College of Fellows of the Royal Architectural Institute of Canada.

Rebeca Damron is an Associate Pjennrofessor of English, Director of the Oklahoma State University Writing Center and Director of the Oklahoma State University Writing Project. She teaches courses in discourse analysis, writing center pedagogy, and environmental writing in the Rhetoric and Professional Writing Program at OSU. Her research has focused on interdisciplinary writing, which has included working on two National Science Foundation grants with engineers as well as writing in architecture. 

Tom Spector is a professor at the Oklahoma State University School of Architecture. He has been a registered architect since 1985 and holds an NCARB certificate, as well as registrations in both Georgia and California. He received a Ph.D. in architecture at the University of California at Berkeley, an M. Arch. from Georgia Tech and a B.S. in business administration from Florida State University. With Rebecca Damron, he coedited the landmark publication How Architects Write, in 2013.

8:30 AM - 10:00 AM

52CE

Building Envelope Commissioning - Design into Reality

1.5 ConEd Learning Hours

This session will also be offered Friday, May 9, 2014 10:30 AM - 12:00 PM

Course Outline

A discussion of the Building Envelope Commissioning process and how it applies to successful environmental separation design and construction will be presented. The theory will be coupled with a case-study example to demonstrate the real benefits to a large and successful project.

BECx is becoming a key function in the translation of design intent into construction reality. Coupling an owner's requirements with a designer's intent, and then closely monitoring the construction delivery is a vital consideration for the success of any project. The continued expansion of energy, durability and operational performance requirements, and the sophistication of new envelope technologies suggests that a formal envelope commissioning process can add enormous benefits to all stakeholders.

This presentation will look into how a formal BECx process should be developed compared to a well-integrated process assisted with the delivery of a successful outcome on the case study project.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Understanding of the Building Envelope Commissioning process
  2. How BECx can provide higher levels of risk management for the delivery of a project
  3. How adoption of a full BECx process will help the Architectural design team achieve its goals and objectives for the project
  4. Understanding of the value of various building envelope design and construction techniques to monitor and improve specific desired project outcomes

Speaker:

David Kayll FMA, P.Eng (ON, NS, NB, NL)
David is a principal of Morrison Hershfield and a professional engineer specializing in building science and building envelope, based in the Ottawa office. His main areas of practice include building envelope / enclosure issues, building envelope commissioning, building science analysis and design and facility management consulting for both new and existing facilities.

David worked for Morrison Hershfield in the Vancouver office from 1999 to 2003, where he became immersed in the repair of “Leaky Condo” buildings, diagnosing causes of failures and assisting with repair or replacement strategies. From 2003 to the present, David has worked in the Ottawa office covering a broad range of projects including heritage building restoration, new building design, failed building envelope rehabilitation and energy performance evaluation. Projects have ranged from Manitoba to Baffin Island to Newfoundland. 

He and his colleagues are well respected for their knowledgeable, pragmatic and effective approach to addressing building envelope issues, whether involved in the initial design to achieve Code compliance performance, achievement of the LEED credit for Durability or in assessing failures and recommending repairs. 

He is a member of the National Building Code’s Standing Committee on Environmental Separation (NBC Part 5) and is actively involved on a number of the Task Groups of the Committee.

In addition, David has assisted Pro-Demnity Insurance Company on assignments aimed at assisting architects avoid claims stemming from envelope failure.

8:30 AM - 10:00 AM

53CE

Construction Lien Act

1.5 ConEd Learning Hours

This session will also be offered Thursday, May 8, 2014 8:30 AM - 10:00 AM

Course Outline

This session looks at the ins and outs of construction lien claims in complex and challenging situations.  Learn how common projects such as condominiums, commercial tenant improvements, and residential subdivisions have special rules that can be tricky for the unwary, and how project owners like municipalities and colleges require careful treatment.  The latest legal updates will be provided including an interesting review of the leading case on liening public infrastructure projects.  Take your basic knowledge of construction liens to a new level in this highly informative session.

Learning Objectives

TBA

Speaker

Glenn Ackerley Glenn practises exclusively in the area of construction law. He represents clients from across the construction industry – including public and private owners, developers, contractors, subtrades, suppliers, and consultants – in a variety of construction-related matters. He is regularly consulted about negotiating and preparing construction and consultant contracts, procurement issues, and risk avoidance strategies. When disputes arise, Glenn acts for clients from both the ICI and residential sectors in construction lien and trust claims, bond claims, and construction delay and deficiency claims.

Glenn is active in the industry, participating on boards, committees and working groups to support and improve the industry, such as on the Council of Ontario Construction Associations' Lien Act Subcommittee, and the Ministry of Health/Ontario General Contractors Association Task Force on standard documents. Glenn sits on the Board of Directors of the Canadian Construction Association, and is the Past Chairman of the Board of the Toronto Construction Association. He has sat on the Executive of the Construction Section of the Ontario Bar Association for many years.

 

8:30 AM - 10:00 AM

54CE

Heritage Structures- Lessons from Claims

1.5 ConEd Learning Hours

This session will also be offered Thursday, May 8, 2014 8:30 AM -10:00 AM

Course Outline

Heritage structures often demand unique architectural requirements and present special claims.

The Claims Managers from Pro-Demnity Insurance Company will review several interesting claims that will illustrate different liability and insurance issues created by the architectural requirements for Heritage structures.  You will be shown how complex a claim may become and what is needed to defend you.

Learning Objective:

In this presentation, the Pro-Demnity Insurance team will:

  1. Review Claims Process
  2. Explore Heritage Building Case Studies
  3. Discuss some of the architectural considerations for heritage structures and the problems these may present.

Pro-Demnity Insurance encourages you to attend this interactive presentation by a team of Pro-Demnity Insurance Claims Professionals.  The presentation will include question and answer periods.

Speakers:

David Croft OAA, FRAIC: Mr. Croft is the Vice President of Claims at Pro-Demnity Insurance Company for over 20 years.  He specializes in large or complex claims and is responsible for forming the current Claims department procedures.  Prior to joining Pro-Demnity Insurance, Mr. Croft held executive positions at a large US Construction Company building tower buildings, residential condominiums and shopping centers.  He was also a partner in an architectural firm for over 16 years designing a wide range of buildings.  Mr. Croft was a “Theme Designer” at EXPO 67 and designed science exhibits for RCA and General Electric.

David Gillespie: Mr. Gillespie is the Deputy Claims Manager, Senior Architect at Pro-Demnity Insurance Company for over 9 years.  He comes to Pro-Demnity Insurance from having been a sole practitioner in Ireland for 3 years and a partner and sole practitioner in Ontario for 22 years.  He has Regional Design Awards in both Ireland and Canada and has experience in institutional, commercial, residential and educational projects in Ireland, Scotland, Canada and the United States.  He also has experience as a mediator, dispute conciliator and as an expert witness.

10:30 AM - 12:00 PM

55CE

Best Practices for High-Performance Historic Renovation

1.5 ConEd Learning hours

This session will also be offered Friday, May 9, 2014 2:00 PM - 3:30 PM

Course Outline

Historic buildings are part of a city’s heritage, skyline and distinct character. Although seen by many as valuable symbols of the community, they also consume significant energy, resources and investment. Maintenance, incorporation of new technologies and occupancy changes need to be dealt with as the building adapts to modern day demands.

In a shifting economy with growing environmental pressures, increased energy costs and changing legislation, making the most of existing buildings, and specifically those designated as historic, is a key priority for public and private owners and occupiers. Getting more from existing buildings will benefit users, the community, the environment, and the bottom line.

In this session, we will set out some of the real solutions that we have used to ensure high performing existing buildings. The selection of international, best-practice case studies will demonstrate some of the outcomes from a range of changes and interventions. From this, an understanding of the wide range of opportunities to upgrade historic properties in your own practice will begin to emerge. 

Through these project examples we will take you through the process for achieving superior performance in an historic building. We will also highlight some of the tools that we have used to help in the decision making process.

Case Studies

39 Hunter Street, Sydney, Australia
Scotstoun House, Edinburgh, Scotland
Cambridge City Hall Annex, Cambridge, MA
King Street Station, Seattle WA
St. Pancras Renaissance Hotel renovation (UK)

Learning Objectives:

  1. Understand the challenges and opportunities in enhancing the performance of historic buildings
  2. Develop a roadmap for achieving high performance building design in the realm of existing building projects.
  3. Recognize the opportunity for historic building rehabilitation to become an exemplar projects for all building renovation.
  4. Learn about new tools to assist in the decision making process of high performance historic building rehabilitation projects.

Speakers:

Mark Walsh-Cooke, PE, is a principal and serves as the existing building skills network leader for Arup. He brings twenty-six years of experience in mechanical engineering design, analysis, and construction. He attended University in Dundee, Scotland where he studied mechanical engineering. He has worked internationally in Arup’s Sydney and London offices prior to joining the Boston office.

Mark is responsible for managing multi-disciplinary project teams and designing systems for a range of building types. These include offices, courthouses, concert halls, laboratories, aquaria, art galleries, museums and a wide range of academic buildings including residence halls and science buildings.

Mark has particular experience in sustainable, zero net energy, and environmentally responsible design; enhancing the environmental performance of new and existing buildings, including the  St. Elizabeths Campus, Department of Homeland Security Headquarters in Washington, DC, a National Historic Landmark District; and the historical Cambridge City Hall Annex in Cambridge, Massachusetts. 

Jennifer McArthur is a mechanical engineer with fourteen years of experience in design and improving the performance of a wide variety of building types. She has led the mechanical design on key projects for Arup in Toronto, most recently the 2015 Pan Am Games stadia and velodrome, and two new subway stations on Toronto’s Spadina Line Extension. She has a passion for improving energy performance in existing buildings and has led numerous renovation, retrofit and renewable energy projects in Canada and India. 

Jenn volunteers with the Canadian Green Building Council and is a passionate advocate for engaging the design community in developing more sustainable buildings, and making the business case for energy performance improvements to existing building stock. She is a sessional lecturer at Ryerson University’s department of architecture, where she teaches project economics with a particular focus on how to incorporate sustainable design principles into the built environment.

Sharon Vattay is an architectural historian with wide-ranging professional and academic experience. She holds a Ph.D. from the University of Toronto where she lectures on the history of architecture.  She is also an associate at Goldsmith, Borgal & Company Ltd. Architects —a Toronto firm specializing in historic restoration and adaptive reuse, with projects across Canada.  

Sharon’s expertise lies in the research, assessment and management of heritage resources.  Archival research has also been undertaken for various levels of government for the purposes of publication and public outreach.  As part of her commitment to Canadian architectural and the preservation thereof, Sharon is an active member of a number of allied organizations, such as the Society for the Study of Architecture in Canada, and the Society of Architectural Historians, and teaches a graduate course in Heritage Preservation Planning at the University of Victoria in British Columbia, Cultural Resource Management Department.

10:30 AM to 12:00 PM

56CE

Building Envelope Commissioning - Design into Reality

1.5 ConEd Learning Hours

This session will also be offered Friday, May 9, 2014 8:30 AM - 10:00 PM

Course Outline

A discussion of the Building Envelope Commissioning process and how it applies to successful environmental separation design and construction will be presented. The theory will be coupled with a case-study example to demonstrate the real benefits to a large and successful project. BECx is becoming a key function in the translation of design intent into construction reality. Coupling an owner's requirements with a designer's intent, and then closely monitoring the construction delivery is a vital consideration for the success of any project. The continued expansion of energy, durability and operational performance requirements, and the sophistication of new envelope technologies suggests that a formal envelope commissioning process can add enormous benefits to all stakeholders.

This presentation will look into how a formal BECx process should be developed compared to a well-integrated process assisted with the delivery of a successful outcome on the case study project.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Understanding of the Building Envelope Commissioning process
  2. How BECx can provide higher levels of risk management for the delivery of a project
  3. How adoption of a full BECx process will help the Architectural design team achieve its goals and objectives for the project
  4. Understanding of the value of various building envelope design and construction techniques to monitor and improve specific desired project outcomes

Speaker:

David Kayll FMA, P.Eng (ON, NS, NB, NL)
David is a principal of Morrison Hershfield and a professional engineer specializing in building science and building envelope, based in the Ottawa office. His main areas of practice include building envelope / enclosure issues, building envelope commissioning, building science analysis and design and facility management consulting for both new and existing facilities.

David worked for Morrison Hershfield in the Vancouver office from 1999 to 2003, where he became immersed in the repair of “Leaky Condo” buildings, diagnosing causes of failures and assisting with repair or replacement strategies. From 2003 to the present, David has worked in the Ottawa office covering a broad range of projects including heritage building restoration, new building design, failed building envelope rehabilitation and energy performance evaluation. Projects have ranged from Manitoba to Baffin Island to Newfoundland. 

He and his colleagues are well respected for their knowledgeable, pragmatic and effective approach to addressing building envelope issues, whether involved in the initial design to achieve Code compliance performance, achievement of the LEED credit for Durability or in assessing failures and recommending repairs. 

He is a member of the National Building Code’s Standing Committee on Environmental Separation (NBC Part 5) and is actively involved on a number of the Task Groups of the Committee.

In addition, David has assisted Pro-Demnity Insurance Company on assignments aimed at assisting architects avoid claims stemming from envelope failure.

10:30 AM- 12:00 PM

57CE

OBC – 2012 Part 9

1.5 ConEd Learning Hours

This session will also be offered Thursday, May 8, 2014 4:00 PM - 5:30 PM

Course Outline

In this course, you will be introduced to changes included in the 2012 Ontario Building Code as they relate to Part 9 buildings.  This will include relevant material from Divisions A and C as well as Division B, Parts 1, 9, 11 and 12, with particular emphasis given to substantive changes to the building code as well as changes related to retirement homes, doors and windows, handrails and guards, foundation walls, and smoke alarms. The course will not cover myriad typographic or grammatical changes where the code intent remains the same.

Learning Objectives:

  1. To provide a basic awareness of the scope of changes incorporated within the 2012 Ontario Building Code;
  2. To provide a more thorough understanding of the most significant changes to requirements for buildings within the scope of Part 9 of the 2012 Ontario Building Code.

Speaker:

Liz Hilfrich is both a Professional Engineer and a Certified Building Code Official, with over 30 years of Building Code experience, including more than 20 years as a municipal Building Official, including 16 years as Chief Building Official for the City of Gloucester, and over 25 years as a facilitator of Ministry of Municipal Affairs and Housing Building Code and Act courses. Having qualifications in all design categories specified by the Building Code, Liz currently runs her own Building Code Consulting business, Hilfrich Inc., providing Code interpretation, analysis and review services to both private and public sector clients. In addition, she has been a member of Ontario’s Building Materials Evaluation Commission since 2004, and a part time teacher at Algonquin College facilitating building code courses since 2006.  Other related activities over the years have included membership on Algonquin College’s Fire protection and Safety Technician Program Advisory Committees and the Working Group to Establish the Home Inspection Certificate Program, and involvement on the executive and two conference host committees of the Golden Triangle Chapter for the Ontario Building Official’s Association.

10:30 AM - 12:00 PM

58CE

The Potential of Heritage Buildings

1.5 ConEd learning hours

This session will be also be offered Friday, May 9, 2014 2:00 PM - 3:30 PM

Course Outline

This presentation will explore the rewards and challenges of working on heritage building projects with reference to a number of recent award-winning adaptive reuse projects, including the Guelph Provincial Offences Court (formerly the Guelph City Hall), No. 10 Toronto Street (originally Toronto’s Seventh Post Office) and the James Cooper Mansion in Toronto.

The session will begin with an introduction to the Ontario Heritage Act, which allows the province and municipalities to designate properties of cultural heritage value or interest. There will be a discussion of acceptable conservation principles and techniques, with reference to the "Standards and Guidelines for Conservation of Historic Places in Canada".  Case studies will be presented, using a series of photo images, to illustrate the process involved in preserving and re-purposing existing heritage buildings as well as the challenges encountered and solutions sought.  Finally, the session will look at how re-using a heritage building preserves the embodied energy which the building and its materials have, supports "green" building guidelines such as LEED, helps revitalize the neighbourhood and its economy, and preserves history.

Learning Objectives 

  1. Identify well-established building conservation principles and techniques
  2. Recognize provincial legislation and municipal by-laws governing alterations to designated heritage buildings
  3. Understand the methodologies of working with heritage buildings and the challenges involved
  4. Consider how the re-purposing of existing heritage buildings contributes to sustainable building design practices, urbanism, economy and culture

Speaker:

Ida Seto, OAA, MRAIC, CAHP, LEED AP BD+C, is a senior architect with Goldsmith Borgal & Company Ltd. Architects (GBCA) In Toronto.   She is a member of the Canadian Association of Heritage Professionals (CAHP) and a LEED Accredited Professional with specialty in Building Design + Construction.  Since joining GBCA in 1999, she has been project architect and / or a team member involved in building assessment, design development and contract administration for a number of heritage restoration and adaptive reuse projects for institutional and private clients, some of which have won awards from the OAA, CAHP, Architectural Conservancy of Ontario and Heritage Toronto.  The most recent of these projects are No. 10 Toronto Street (originally Toronto’s Seventh Post Office), the Guelph Provincial Offences Court (formerly the Guelph City Hall), the James Cooper Mansion, and Longo’s Leaside Store (originally the Canadian Northern Railway Eastern Lines Locomotive Shop) in Toronto, for which Ida’s role was that of project architect.

2:00 PM -5:30 PM

59CE

Manipulating & Harnessing the Microclimate

3 ConEd Learning hours

This session is also offered Friday, May 9, 214 8:30 AM - 12:00 PM

Course Outline

The purpose of this seminar will be to describe strategies and processes to design and harness the microclimate (e.g. wind, solar, rain, temperature, etc.) around buildings. The objective of harnessing the microclimate is to maximise the perception of acceptable thermal comfort experienced by pedestrians and residents and to increase the viability of natural ventilation within the building units. During the course of the presentation the tools, and means to score “success” for both natural ventilation and thermal comfort, will be discussed. Other microclimate features such as rain penetration, solar impacts (e.g. glare), noise and odour will also be addressed.

By definition, the construction of a building creates a microclimate that is associated with the presence of the building itself. In the development of a masterplan, the combination of buildings can create a larger microclimate which impacts the local wind, solar and other climate parameters including heat island. Given that the process of design involves a series of decisions, a design team can choose to design the microclimate too. The decisions can lead to increased natural ventilation and thermal comfort, or reductions in the viability of both. The microclimate is often defined as simply the wind. This undersells the potential of the building as the microclimate involves odour, wind, noise, glare, shade and other aspects of climate.

The presentation will discuss manipulation of a microclimate for a variety of parameters focussing on overall comfort (wind and thermal) for masterplans in a variety of regions. We will also address means to describe the interaction between the outside and inside of the building.

Learning Objective

  1. To understand the different options by which one describes and quantifies wind and thermal comfort - the different indices, the variables within them, the benefits and drawbacks - focus will be on the thermal aspects of outdoor comfort.
  2. To understand the methods, and their limitations, to model and predict thermal comfort parameters (eg wind, temperature, mean radiant temperature) within the urban environment so that spaces can be scored. This will include local heat island impacts.
  3. To identify means to improve thermal comfort within the public realm using different massing, building adjacencies and topologies, etc. to manipulate wind and shade and how one can scoring described in 1) and 2) to evaluate solutions.
  4. To diagnose different examples from around the world - what works and what doesn't - using real examples in different climates.

Speakers

Goncalo Pedro, has a PhD in mechanical engineering in computational fluid dynamics from the University of Victoria. At RWDI, he provides specialist expertise in microclimate analysis with a focus on master planning, sustainability and ventilation. Goncalo has worked on a variety of projects such as Beijing Central Business District Master plan. Mecca and the King Abdullah City for Atomic and Renewable Energy by helping to assess the potential for passive and active sustainability measures in challenging climates.

John Alberico is a Project Director specializing in air quality and microclimate assessments. He joined RWDI in 1988, and became a Principal in 2004.  He is a Canadian Certified Environmental Professional.

As a Project Director, he provides overall technical direction to engineering teams on air quality and microclimate projects ensuring that a high level of service is provided and RWDI’s interests are preserved on all projects.

John’s area of technical expertise is in exhaust and dust dispersion, and wind flow around buildings, which has included involvement in several hundred projects providing expert consultation, and conducting both numerical and wind tunnel modelling. His primary focus has been in the institutional, healthcare, higher education and pharmaceutical sectors.  His involvement in many of these projects has included environmental impact assessments and Certificates of Approval in Ontario.

John has also managed engineering teams that have provided air quality, odour, dust, ventilation, noise, acoustic and vibration assessments for a broad range of applications on local, national and international projects. These have included pits and quarries, landfills, composting facilities, roadways, residential developments, and industrial facilities in addition to healthcare, higher education and pharmaceutical facilities.

2:00 PM -5:30 PM

60CE

Pricing Design Services & Writing Effective Fee Proposals

3 ConEd Learning hours

Course Outline

Part 1 - Pricing Design Services

Most architects are trained to price design services according to project cost which frequently leaves firms competing on fee to win new work and bartering for position at the negotiation table. During this presentation we take a look at the concepts provided by price discrimination and the many benefits associated with adopting a multiple fee pricing strategy. 

Key Concepts:

  • Price Discrimination (1st, 2nd & 3rd degree)
  • Bundling and Unbundling
  • Up-selling
  • Cross-selling
  • Versioning
  • Ethics and the Law in Pricing
  • Predatory pricing

Part 2 - Writing Effective Fee Proposals

Fee scales are a thing of the past however many architects struggle to write proposals that address the challenges and rewards offered by this new era. During this presentation we draw from a series of studies conducted by researchers from the field of human behavior to demonstrate the seven fundamental principles behind a successful fee proposal strategy and the factors that cause clients to say yes at your request.

Key Concepts:

  • Principle of Consistency
  • Principle of Reciprocity
  • Principle of Simplicity
  • Principle of Options
  • Principle of Liking
  • Principle of Value
  • Principle of Mental Accounting

Speakers:

Ian Motley graduated from university in the UK with a BSc in Building Science [Project Management]. Prior to starting Blue Turtle Consulting, Ian was an Associate Partner with Foster + Partners firm of Architects in London, where he was responsible for proposing and negotiating design fees and appointment terms and conditions for many of Foster + Partners’ new design projects around the world. Before joining Foster + Partners, Ian worked in the United States managing commercial, residential and industrial projects throughout the country. Ian has also worked on development projects in Spain and Honduras where he learnt to read, write and speak Spanish. Ian has been a guest speaker at design fee negotiation presentations held by design institutes and private companies around the world. Ian has also written and published a series of guides on the subjects of architectural fees, appointments and negotiations.

Alexandra Howieson studied Architecture at the University of Sydney where she received awards and scholarships for her achievements in Architectural Science, Architectural Design, Urban Design and Planning and overall academic performance. After graduation,  Alex moved to London to accept a sponsored position with Foster + Partners where she was instrumental in the design and documentation of several key projects in Asia and the Middle East. Alexandra is a Registered Architect in NSW, Australia and has presented on the subjects of behavioural finance and pricing strategies for the Australian Institute of Architects (AIA), the New Zealand Institute of Architects (NZIA), Emerging Architects Network (DARCH), the Building Designers Association (BDA) and many private companies. Alex has also been a panelist for the Design Institute of Australia’s DIAlogues series discussing Free-Bidding and Undercutting.

2:00 PM -5:30 PM

61CE

C-Suite for Architects: Four Pillars of Business Success

3 ConEd Learning hours

Course Outline

There are over 1,500 practices in Ontario which rank a high proportion compared to other professions given that we have 3458 registered architects in the province. In 2013, the construction industry's contribution to GNP was about 14% or $300 Billion. How much of this money reached architects in the form of fees and salaries? 

In this session an expert panel of architects, lawyers, accountants, business advisors and marketing professionals discuss elements of good business that will usher architects to a greater success with a comprehensive set of tools.

  • Platform is the core principles describing the firm’s Vision which will guide it for ever.
  • Purpose: is the reason(s) for the company’s existence and will be continuously pursued (can never be over).
  • Plan is the specific models in leadership, communication, PR, R&D and operations for financial health, delivery of services, marketing and sales.
  • Picture is the specific blueprint and vivid image of the company from chairs to floor plan, from interiors to logo design and letterhead.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Update attendees on some aspects of the Ontario Architects Act
  2. Business plan for start-ups and succession planning
  3. New business managements trends
  4. Opportunities for architects and transferable skills

Speakers:

Scott Armstrong
is a partner at Brainrider where he helps companies create better B2B marketing including better websites, better content and better lead generation & nurturing programs.   He also teaches part-time at OCAD University, in his day job at Brainrider he works with companies who want to grow by accelerating and expanding their sales pipeline through marketing, web design, lead generation, digital marketing, demand generation, CRM, marketing automation, advertising, and content.

Loghman Azar is a partner at LINE Architect Inc. based in Toronto, and has designed projects in Denver, Boston, Knoxville, Montreal, Calgary, Vancouver and Toronto as well as overseas. He studied economics, architecture and urban design and moved to Toronto after his graduation from Harvard University.  His high performance projects include Innovation Square office towers in Toronto, Clearnet (Telus) Switch Centers in Toronto, Montreal and Fleming College in Peterborough which received recognitions from Canada Wood Council, Ministry of Natural Resources and OAA honorable mention for design excellence. Loghman coauthored a book on energy saving commissioned by Union Gas and Enbridge in 1998 and has showcased projects and been a speaker in various venues and conferences including Construct Canada, IIdex, Canada Energy Conferences, continuing education courses at the AIBC and APEGBC. Loghman has served on Toronto Society of Architects board, OAA Practice and Environment, AIBC Professional Development committees, and currently serves as president of the Conservation Council of Ontario.

Elaine Pantel has been a principal at Shimmerman Penn LLP since 2001. She provides business advisory, assurance and accounting services to a broad range of owner-managed businesses and not-for-profit organizations. She advises clients in areas including succession planning, ownership agreements, business financing, cash flow management, bench-marking and managing business operations and compensation strategies for employees and owners. Elaine is a member of the firm’s Marketing Committee and co-leads the firm’s industry specialty groups for Architecture, Engineering and Design (AED) and Investment Management Firms. Elaine is the firm’s expert for not-for-profit organizations. She has written widely and spoken regularly at the firm's industry seminars and workshops for AED firms, and has represented the firm at many PrimeGlobal conferences.

Courtney Raphael is a partner and member of the firm’s Litigation Group and Commercial Leasing Team. Courtney practises civil litigation with an emphasis on construction, commercial and municipal matters. She also has experience in defamation law. Courtney has represented clients before a number of boards, tribunals, and before various levels of court, including the Superior Court of Justice and the Ontario Court of Appeal. Courtney’s engineering background has assisted her in developing a practice in the construction and product liability areas. Her construction law practice includes defending architects in professional negligence claims and advising clients on disputes that arise under the Construction Lien Act.  In her commercial leasing practice, Courtney advises landlords and tenants on all aspects of commercial leasing disputes including defaults on leases, injunction proceedings and the interpretation of lease agreements.

Paul Hastings is a practicing architect with his own firm in Oakville, prior to joining Public Works and Government Services Canada. He has been a Vice President of the OAA where his term ended Dec.31.2013. He has founded and coordinated the Small Practice Information Forum, SPIF, for architects where many shared challenges were discussed and solutions formulated for practice viability. He has published a well-received article in Perspectives Magazine, the Sole Practitioner: Part 1, and has given presentations on the Future of Architecture to various groups. With a background in Engineering, Environmental Design Studies and Architecture, he has used his multidisciplinary training to complete many projects and recently achieved Green Globes 4 on a renovation project, surpassing the Green Globes 3 client requirement. Paul has been involved with Ryerson University Department of Architecture as the OAA liaison on the Program Advisory Committee and provided assistance thru Council to remove road blocks in the recording of intern experience. He was the Chair of the Discipline Committee for years, and was active on various other OAA committees as well. The cumulative experience has provided a unique opportunity to gain an in-depth look into the practice and business of architecture and see great opportunity for the profession in a variety of areas.

2:00 PM -5:30 PM

62CE

OBC – 2012 Part 3

3 ConEd Learning hours

This session will also be offered Thursday, May 08, 2014 from 8:30 AM to 12:00 PM

Course Outline

In this course, you will be introduced to changes included in the 2012 Ontario Building Code as they relate to Part 3 buildings.  This will include relevant material from Divisions A and C, as well as Division B, Parts 1, 3, 5, 11 and 12, with particular emphasis given to substantive changes to the building code as well as related items such as fire alarm and exit lighting of specific relevance to architects. The course will not cover myriad typographic or grammatical changes where the code intent remains the same. 

Learning Objectives:

  1. To provide a basic awareness of the scope of changes incorporated within the 2012 Ontario Building Code;
  2. To provide a more thorough understanding of the most significant changes to requirements for buildings within the scope of Part 3 of the 2012 Ontario Building Code

Speaker:

Liz Hilfrich is both a Professional Engineer and a Certified Building Code Official, with over 30 years of Building Code experience, including more than 20 years as a municipal Building Official, including 16 years as Chief Building Official for the City of Gloucester, and over 25 years as a facilitator of Ministry of Municipal Affairs and Housing Building Code and Act courses. Having qualifications in all design categories specified by the Building Code, Liz currently runs her own Building Code Consulting business, Hilfrich Inc., providing Code interpretation, analysis and review services to both private and public sector clients. In addition, she has been a member of Ontario’s Building Materials Evaluation Commission since 2004, and a part time teacher at Algonquin College facilitating building code courses since 2006.  Other related activities over the years have included membership on Algonquin College’s Fire protection and Safety Technician Program Advisory Committees and the Working Group to Establish the Home Inspection Certificate Program, and involvement on the executive and two conference host committees of the Golden Triangle Chapter for the Ontario Building Official’s Association.

2:00 PM -5:30 PM

63CE

New Accessibility Changes to the Building Code

3 ConEd Learning hours

This session will also be offered Friday, May 09, 2014 8:30 AM - 12:00 PM

Course Outline

This session will outline the accessibility amendments made to the 2012 Building Code by Ontario Regulation 368/13.

These amendments will come into effect on January 1, 2015 and will have a significant impact on building design and construction in Ontario.  This session will include an in-depth review of the following revised requirements:

  • Barrier-Free Pedestrian Entrances
  • Power Door Operators
  • Barrier-Free Access to All Other Floor Areas
  • Barrier-Free Path Dimensions
  • Visitable Suites in Apartment Buildings
  • Hotels and Motels
  • Emergency Power
  • Visual Smoke Alarms
  • Visual Signal Devices for Fire Alarm and Detection Systems
  • Universal Toilet Rooms and Other Washrooms
  • Access to Pools and Spas
  • Adaptable Seating
  • Renovations

This session will focus on new requirements and participants are expected to have a basic understanding of the accessibility requirements of the current Ontario Building Code.  Links to on-line resources, such as a line-by-line annotated version of the changes will be provided.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Understand how the accessibility amendments to the Building Code were developed;
  2. Understand the nature of the accessibility amendments;
  3. Understand how the technical changes will affect building design in Ontario; 

Speaker:

Alek Antoniuk, B.E.S., B. Arch., OAA

Alek Antoniuk was the Manager of the code development team that developed these accessibility amendments. Alek Antoniuk has over 34 years of experience in building code development and design and is a recognized expert in the development of construction codes in Canada.  Although he is best known for co-ordinating and managing the technical development of the 2006 and the 2012 editions of the Ontario Building Code, he played a lead role in managing the code advisory services of the Ontario Ministry of Municipal Affairs and Housing since 1989.  He was the principal of his own architectural design practice for 5 years and the deputy chief building official for the former Borough of East York (now City of Toronto) for 5 years.  Alek Antoniuk is a member of the OAA and holds an Ontario BCIN for all OBC categories of qualifications.

2:00 PM – 5:30 PM

64CE

Architectural Programming

3 ConEd Learning hours

This session is also offered Friday, May 9, 2014 8:30 AM - 12:00 PM

Course Outline

“Programming is the first creative act of a project”

In this course we will look at the various ways a space program is developed which includes examining how to develop a program based on an Owner’s list of requirements and what to do when an Owner gives you a space program.   This will be illustrated using institutional building types which will include education, recreation and justice facilities.   We will review the difference between a Performance Based Statement of Requirements and a Prescriptive Based Statement of Requirements. We will look at various tools to communicate the program so that informative decisions can be made by the Owner.  There will be an interactive component which will allow participants to partake in a program preparation exercise.

Learning Objectives

  1. Understand how to develop a program based on the owner requirements and needs.  Review the different steps in developing a Needs Assessment and a space program.
  2. Understand how to review and analyze an owner’s space program and determine if it aligns with the appropriate standards and the project budget.
  3. Review the difference between a Performance Based Statement of Requirements and a Prescriptive Based Statement of Requirements.
  4. Understand how to use a space program as a tool that can be applied at all stages of the design and construction process.

Review the use of various diagrams to communicate the written program to the Owner/users.

Speaker

Maureen O’Shaughnessy- Principal
B.ES., B.Arch., OAA, FRAIC, REFP 

Maureen O’Shaughnessy is one of the country’s leading experts on educational planning and design. A Recognized Educational Facility Professional (REFP) and an active member of the Council of Educational Facilities Planners International (CEFPI), Maureen imparts to the firm her particular expertise in the provision of planning, programming and design for educational clients and she has worked diligently to help direct and expand the firm’s strength in this sector.  To date, CS&P has been responsible for the design of over 350 educational and instructional facilities including childcare facilities, elementary schools, high schools, independent schools, colleges and universities. These projects typically involve extensive user group consultation and Maureen has been particularly successful in working closely with these large multi-faceted client groups to gain their consensus and support. 

Maureen has advised school boards across Canada on educational facility issues including long range board-wide facility planning, new school models for the delivery of 21st Century Learning, and program renewal for existing schools. 

As part of her commitment to providing quality education and learning environments across the world, Maureen sits on the Board of Directors for the Schools for the Children of the World (SCW) Canada, developing partnerships to build schools in remote communities in Honduras and Haiti. Maureen is a Principal with CS&P Architects and was elected as a Fellow to the Royal Architectural Institute of Canada in 2013.

Peter Ortved, Principal
B.Arch., OAA, SAA, FRAIC

A Principal of CS&P Architects, Peter has over 35 years of experience as a practicing architect.  After receiving his Bachelor of Architecture degree from the University of Toronto, he joined CS&P in 1972. As one of the firm’s corporate directors, Peter assumes primary responsibility for project development and has spearheaded many of CS&P’s most significant civic, municipal and recreational projects. 

Peter has exceptional knowledge of professional practice, the construction industry, and urban design issues.  He has been a board member for several community organizations and served as a Professional Advisor for national and international architectural design competitions. Recently, he was a Juror for the St. Lawrence Market North Building Design Competition for the City of Toronto. Currently, he is the Team Leader for the New Saskatoon Police Service Headquarters. He is a member of the Ontario Association of Architects and a Fellow of the Royal Architectural Institute of Canada.

Anna Cascioli
, Senior Associate
B.Arch., OAA, SAA, MRAIC

Since graduating from the University of Toronto in 1997, Anna has gained experience as a project architect and designer for a wide variety of building types. She has worked extensively for institutional clients including several Police Facilities, School Boards, Recreation Centres, and Long Term Care clients.

 

Anna brings to the team strong leadership and communication skills which are invaluable to the smooth delivery of complex projects with multidisciplinary consulting teams. Anna was the Project Architect on the Planning, Design and Compliance team for the Ontario Provincial Police Modernization Project, and recently completed a comprehensive programming study for the Regina Police Facilities Renewal Program. Her experience in planning and programming for police facilities also includes work for the Saskatoon Police Service and the Guelph Police Service.

2:00 PM - 3:30 PM

65CE

Architectural Writing: Getting the Message Out

1.5 ConEd Learning Hours

This session will also be offered Thursday, May 8, 2014 4:00 PM - 5:30 PM AND Friday, May 9, 2014 8:30 AM - 10:00 PM

Course Outline

There will be two sections:

(1) Writing in Aid of Design and (2) Writing to Express Architectural Thought. The writing audience is “external,” so ideas must be expressed clearly and simply. Creative writing skills play an important role. Attendees will be introduced to examples of both forms of architectural writing and will be given useful strategies to assist them in their own writing.

A. Design Writing: Includes design journals, project descriptions for publication, proposals, marketing, promotional and written design objectives. Writing clearly and succinctly makes our design ideas easier to organize and evaluate.  B. Architectural Thought: includes the above, as well as journal and newspaper articles. Effectively describing design intent and approach might make the difference in convincing a potential client to invest in a project, or not.
The presentation will answer the question: How can architects tap into their “inner writer”?

Speakers:

Gordon Grice, during his nearly 40 years as a freelance architectural illustrator, Gordon Grice has had the opportunity to work closely with a variety of clients and audiences around the world. He is a past president of the American Society of Architectural Illustrators (ASAI) and currently serves the organization as senior advisor and consultant for Architecture in Perspective, ASAI’s annual international illustration competition. Over the past 20 years, Gordon has been active as a writer and editor, having published more than two dozen books dealing with design and architectural illustration. Since 1997, he has had the privilege of editing the OAA quarterly journal OAA Perspectives and is currently co-editing an OAA 125th-anniversary retrospective, to be released in 2014. Gordon is also a creative advisor to Forrec Ltd. in Toronto, in which capacity he participates in art direction, creative writing, thematic development and the marketing of entertainment design services, internationally. Gordon is a member and regional chair of the College of Fellows of the Royal Architectural Institute of Canada.

Rebeca Damron is an Associate Pjennrofessor of English, Director of the Oklahoma State University Writing Center and Director of the Oklahoma State University Writing Project. She teaches courses in discourse analysis, writing center pedagogy, and environmental writing in the Rhetoric and Professional Writing Program at OSU. Her research has focused on interdisciplinary writing, which has included working on two National Science Foundation grants with engineers as well as writing in architecture. 

Tom Spector is a professor at the Oklahoma State University School of Architecture. He has been a registered architect since 1985 and holds an NCARB certificate, as well as registrations in both Georgia and California. He received a Ph.D. in architecture at the University of California at Berkeley, an M. Arch. from Georgia Tech and a B.S. in business administration from Florida State University. With Rebecca Damron, he coedited the landmark publication How Architects Write, in 2013.

2:00 PM - 3:30 PM

66CE

Best Practices for High-Performance Historic Renovation

1.5 ConEd Learning hours

This session will also be offered Friday, May 9, 2014 10:30 AM - 12:00 PM

Course Outline

Historic buildings are part of a city’s heritage, skyline and distinct character. Although seen by many as valuable symbols of the community, they also consume significant energy, resources and investment. Maintenance, incorporation of new technologies and occupancy changes need to be dealt with as the building adapts to modern day demands.

In a shifting economy with growing environmental pressures, increased energy costs and changing legislation, making the most of existing buildings, and specifically those designated as historic, is a key priority for public and private owners and occupiers. Getting more from existing buildings will benefit users, the community, the environment, and the bottom line.

In this session, we will set out some of the real solutions that we have used to ensure high performing existing buildings. The selection of international, best-practice case studies will demonstrate some of the outcomes from a range of changes and interventions. From this, an understanding of the wide range of opportunities to upgrade historic properties in your own practice will begin to emerge.

Through these project examples we will take you through the process for achieving superior performance in an historic building. We will also highlight some of the tools that we have used to help in the decision making process.

Case Studies

39 Hunter Street, Sydney, Australia
Scotstoun House, Edinburgh, Scotland
Cambridge City Hall Annex, Cambridge, MA
King Street Station, Seattle WA
St. Pancras Renaissance Hotel renovation (UK)

Learning Objectives:

  1. Understand the challenges and opportunities in enhancing the performance of historic buildings
  2. Develop a roadmap for achieving high performance building design in the realm of existing building projects.
  3. Recognize the opportunity for historic building rehabilitation to become an exemplar projects for all building renovation.
  4. Learn about new tools to assist in the decision making process of high performance historic building rehabilitation projects.

Speakers:

Mark Walsh-Cooke, PE, is a principal and serves as the existing building skills network leader for Arup. He brings twenty-six years of experience in mechanical engineering design, analysis, and construction. He attended University in Dundee, Scotland where he studied mechanical engineering. He has worked internationally in Arup’s Sydney and London offices prior to joining the Boston office.

Mark is responsible for managing multi-disciplinary project teams and designing systems for a range of building types. These include offices, courthouses, concert halls, laboratories, aquaria, art galleries, museums and a wide range of academic buildings including residence halls and science buildings.

Mark has particular experience in sustainable, zero net energy, and environmentally responsible design; enhancing the environmental performance of new and existing buildings, including the  St. Elizabeths Campus, Department of Homeland Security Headquarters in Washington, DC, a National Historic Landmark District; and the historical Cambridge City Hall Annex in Cambridge, Massachusetts. 

Jennifer McArthur is a mechanical engineer with fourteen years of experience in design and improving the performance of a wide variety of building types. She has led the mechanical design on key projects for Arup in Toronto, most recently the 2015 Pan Am Games stadia and velodrome, and two new subway stations on Toronto’s Spadina Line Extension. She has a passion for improving energy performance in existing buildings and has led numerous renovation, retrofit and renewable energy projects in Canada and India. 

Jenn volunteers with the Canadian Green Building Council and is a passionate advocate for engaging the design community in developing more sustainable buildings, and making the business case for energy performance improvements to existing building stock. She is a sessional lecturer at Ryerson University’s department of architecture, where she teaches project economics with a particular focus on how to incorporate sustainable design principles into the built environment.

Sharon Vattay is an architectural historian with wide-ranging professional and academic experience. She holds a Ph.D. from the University of Toronto where she lectures on the history of architecture.  She is also an associate at Goldsmith, Borgal & Company Ltd. Architects —a Toronto firm specializing in historic restoration and adaptive reuse, with projects across Canada.  

Sharon’s expertise lies in the research, assessment and management of heritage resources.  Archival research has also been undertaken for various levels of government for the purposes of publication and public outreach.  As part of her commitment to Canadian architectural and the preservation thereof, Sharon is an active member of a number of allied organizations, such as the Society for the Study of Architecture in Canada, and the Society of Architectural Historians, and teaches a graduate course in Heritage Preservation Planning at the University of Victoria in British Columbia, Cultural Resource Management Department.

2:00 PM - 3:30 PM

67CE

From Conceptual BIM to All-Out BIM

1.5 ConEd Learning hours

This session is also offered Friday, May 9, 2014 4:00 PM to 5:30 PM

Course Outline

This course will focus on utilizing BIM to enhance conceptual design by exploring new possibilities which this mode of delivery brings to architects.  As a profession, we're faced with a struggle between "how we worked" and the "new technologies" which by their essence are reshaping the foundation of our established delivery practices.  BIM should be seen as an instrument enhancing the architect's ability to function as a conductor in the realm of design.  BIM provides various avenues enabling the architect to craft their designs complementing conceptual development and enriching a project's development.

Learning Objectives

  1. Understand fundamentally what Building Information Modelling is, how it's scalable, and its impact on the architect;
  2. Understand how to harness BIM to complement the development of an architectural concept
  3. Understand strategies focusing on first-time BIM deployment.
  4. Understand how a BIM-based conceptual design can flow through the rest of the design phases to project completion.

Speaker:

Brent Mauti is a practicing architect who graduated from the University of Toronto in 2002 and have been working with CH2M Hill Canada Architects ever since.  Aside from acting as project architect, he also functions as the global BIM delivery leader for CH2M Hill with experience on the London 2012 Olympics, Abu Dhabi MASDAR City, Panama Canal Widening, World Cup 2022 Program Management, and many other projects both large and small.  When performing his designs, he strives to leverage BIM practices and tools to enrich his project development from concept through to construction completion.

 

2:00 PM - 3:30 PM

68CE

The Potential of Heritage Buildings

1.5 ConEd learning hours

This session will be also be offered Friday, May 9, 2014 10:30 AM - 12:00 PM

Course Outline

This presentation will explore the rewards and challenges of working on heritage building projects with reference to a number of recent award-winning adaptive reuse projects, including the Guelph Provincial Offences Court (formerly the Guelph City Hall), No. 10 Toronto Street (originally Toronto’s Seventh Post Office) and the James Cooper Mansion in Toronto.

The session will begin with an introduction to the Ontario Heritage Act, which allows the province and municipalities to designate properties of cultural heritage value or interest. There will be a discussion of acceptable conservation principles and techniques, with reference to the "Standards and Guidelines for Conservation of Historic Places in Canada".  Case studies will be presented, using a series of photo images, to illustrate the process involved in preserving and re-purposing existing heritage buildings as well as the challenges encountered and solutions sought.  Finally, the session will look at how re-using a heritage building preserves the embodied energy which the building and its materials have, supports "green" building guidelines such as LEED, helps revitalize the neighbourhood and its economy, and preserves history.

Learning Objectives 

  1. Identify well-established building conservation principles and techniques
  2. Recognize provincial legislation and municipal by-laws governing alterations to designated heritage buildings
  3. Understand the methodologies of working with heritage buildings and the challenges involved
  4. Consider how the re-purposing of existing heritage buildings contributes to sustainable building design practices, urbanism, economy and culture

Speaker

Ida Seto, OAA, MRAIC, CAHP, LEED AP BD+C, is a senior architect with Goldsmith Borgal & Company Ltd. Architects (GBCA) In Toronto.   She is a member of the Canadian Association of Heritage Professionals (CAHP) and a LEED Accredited Professional with specialty in Building Design + Construction.  Since joining GBCA in 1999, she has been project architect and / or a team member involved in building assessment, design development and contract administration for a number of heritage restoration and adaptive reuse projects for institutional and private clients, some of which have won awards from the OAA, CAHP, Architectural Conservancy of Ontario and Heritage Toronto.  The most recent of these projects are No. 10 Toronto Street (originally Toronto’s Seventh Post Office), the Guelph Provincial Offences Court (formerly the Guelph City Hall), the James Cooper Mansion, and Longo’s Leaside Store (originally the Canadian Northern Railway Eastern Lines Locomotive Shop) in Toronto, for which Ida’s role was that of project architect.

4:00 PM - 5:30 PM

69CE

From Conceptual BIM to All-Out BIM

1.5 ConEd Learning hours

This session is also offered Friday, May 9, 2014 2:00 PM to 3:30 PM

Course Outline

This course will focus on utilizing BIM to enhance conceptual design by exploring new possibilities which this mode of delivery brings to architects.  As a profession, we're faced with a struggle between "how we worked" and the "new technologies" which by their essence are reshaping the foundation of our established delivery practices.  BIM should be seen as an instrument enhancing the architect's ability to function as a conductor in the realm of design.  BIM provides various avenues enabling the architect to craft their designs complementing conceptual development and enriching a project's development.

Learning Objectives

  1. Understand fundamentally what Building Information Modelling is, how it's scalable, and its impact on the architect;
  2. Understand how to harness BIM to complement the development of an architectural concept
  3. Understand strategies focusing on first-time BIM deployment.
  4. Understand how a BIM-based conceptual design can flow through the rest of the design phases to project completion.

Speaker:

Brent Mauti is a practicing architect who graduated from the University of Toronto in 2002 and have been working with CH2M Hill Canada Architects ever since.  Aside from acting as project architect, he also functions as the global BIM delivery leader for CH2M Hill with experience on the London 2012 Olympics, Abu Dhabi MASDAR City, Panama Canal Widening, World Cup 2022 Program Management, and many other projects both large and small.  When performing his designs, he strives to leverage BIM practices and tools to enrich his project development from concept through to construction completion.

4:00 PM - 5:30 PM

70CE

Risk Assessment and Mitigation in a Heritage Context

1.5 ConEd Learning Hours

This session will also be offered Thursday, May 8, 2014 2:00 PM- 3:30 PM

Course Outline

Heritage projects can present inherent risks that should be identified and addressed right from the initial planning phases. This session provides an overview of these potential risks – both internal and external – that exist at each stage of a project, as well as various mitigation strategies. We will analyze how different organizational structures can influence project objectives, decision-making principles, quality assurance/control, integration and effective communication. We will address the role of archival research and investigations: exploratory investigations, non-destructive analysis, materials’ testing and material procurement.  We will review when prequalification and unit price contracts are recommended. We will look at various protection methods and precautions that should be implemented during the construction. Finally, we ask ourselves, does the proposed works pose a risk to the very heritage fabric of the building?

Learning Objectives

  1. To identify potential risks on heritage projects
  2. To analyze and categorize these risks
  3. To evaluate the potential mitigation measures
  4. To track the identified risks and mitigation measures as the project evolves  

Speaker

DIMA COOK, Senior Associate at Fournier Gersovitz Moss Drolet et associés architectes, OAA, OAQ, LEED AP BD+C, RAIC, APT

Dima Cook joined Fournier Gersovitz Moss Drolet (FGMDA) in 1998, has been serving as Senior Associate since 2008 and was appointed manager of the Toronto branch office in 2012. For over 18 years, Dima has been honing her skills as Heritage Conservation architect, working on institutional projects, namely a Cultural Heritage Resource Assessment of the University of Toronto St. George campus; a Historic Structure Report of Old City Hall of Toronto; a Building Condition Assessment of Union Station Toronto which includes a 20-year State of Good Repair projection; accessibility upgrades of 11 armories, 7 of which are heritage buildings, for the Department of National Defense; and the restoration/rehabilitation of the historic Harbour Commissioners’ Building into a private club, the 357c, for Terra Incognito.  Since 2009, Dima is the Heritage Project Architect of the $450M Union Station Revitalization project for NORR/City of Toronto, managing concept design, heritage approvals, contract document production and contract administration.  She is a member of the Sustainability sub-committee on climate change for APT (Association for Preservation Technology) and LEED AP BD+C-accredited. Ms. Cook’s knowledge of conservation and construction is well paired with her organizational skills to ensure efficient management of the projects under her supervision.

4:00 PM - 5:30 PM

71CE

The Architects as Social Developers of Heritage Sites

1.5 ConEd Learning Hours

This session will also be offered Wednesday, May 7, 2014 4:00 PM - 5:30 PM

Course Outline

Architects have a fundamental role to play in order to realize the social potential of vacant or derelict historic landmarks. Through the presentation of several case studies we will posit that 'recycled' heritage architecture can be a catalyst for community renewal.

Various approaches will be proposed for evaluating the potential of heritage architecture, including urban studies at various scales, architectural and historical census of a site, and financial feasibility studies. An analysis of the gathered information will determine essential conservation elements and appropriate development opportunities.

Obstacles to heritage projects will be addressed, including regulatory, financial and emotional hurdles. Community consultation and an ongoing dialogue with local organizations are employed as a means to build momentum and create consensus around projects, as well as a tool to identify opportunity sites.

Heritage architecture historically acted as a physical cornerstone of a community -an anchor of public space and a symbol of neighbourhood identity. Architects have the skills to harness community initiative and transform disused historic landmarks into new social reincarnations, allowing heritage architecture to reclaim its role as primary actor in the urban and cultural context.

Learning Objectives

  1. Evaluating the past, existing and future role(s) played by a heritage site in the urban, architectural and community fabric.
  2. Navigating the regulatory, financial, social and emotional constraints to proposed heritage projects.
  3. Harnessing momentum and building community consensus to realize projects.
  4. Designing heritage architecture as anchors and opportunity sites for community building and revitalization.

Speaker

Ron Rayside, MOAQ, is the founding partner of Rayside Labossière Inc., an architecture firm specialized in social architecture and urban planning.

An active participant of Montreal community groups since the 1970s, Ron's involvement has ranged from member of various coalitions and steering committees, to president of the board of directors of the Centre-Sud Corporation for Community Economic Development (CDEC), and the Health and Social Services Centre Jeanne-Mance (CSSS). He is a mainstay at Montreal conferences and forums on homelessness and social exclusion, the future of churches in Quebec, and the development of neighbourhoods and "popular" urbanism.

Ron's social involvement informs the philosophy of his architectural practice, and his firm frequently accompanies community groups from the initial phases of project development. Through the preparation of preliminary sketches, economic feasibility studies, or full architectural services from inception to completion of building, Rayside Labossière Inc. facilitates and assists organizations', residents' and businesses' involvement in the urban and architectural projects that shape their communities.

Beyond his role as an architect, Ron is an engaged citizen who actively contributes to the development and revitalization of his surroundings. In 2013 he was awarded the Thérèse-Daviau prize in recognition of his outstanding contribution to the Montreal community.

4:00 PM - 5:30 PM

72CE

Bringing the Past to Light

1.5 ConEd Learning Hours

This session will also be offered Thursday, May 8, 2014 10:30 AM - 12:00 PM

Course Outline

Restoring heritage buildings presents unique challenges; careful consideration is needed before any intervention may be permitted. The landscape is further complicated with the use of LED technology.  It has evolved into the “go to” solution, although there are still some specific considerations to address to ensure their suitability and successful results.  One key to successful heritage (and) adaptive reuse is a successful process; case studies of sustainable adaptive reuse and heritage designated projects reinforce the potential harmony of the old and the new, when approached with careful analysis and creative design.  

Learning Objectives:

  1. To understand how "sustainability" applies to re-lighting old buildings
  2. To become aware of how lighting technology can affect the project’s heritage sensibility and other outcomes.
  3. To recognize how successfully integrated design process affects results
  4. To experience projects where old buildings breathe new life with updated design and technology.

Speaker:

Deborah Gottesman is the principal of Gottesman Associates, an architectural lighting design firm established in 1999, with distinctive expertise in sustainability and heritage applications. Deborah's 25 years in all facets of the lighting industry, including design, engineering, management, education, and manufacturing gives her a contextual understanding of lighting from all perspectives. 

Deborah has successfully worked on projects in many sectors, and has taught lighting at all levels to a wide audience from students to senior architects. A past president of the Toronto Section IES, Deborah has been involved in the IESNA at local, regional, and international levels.

9:00 AM - 11:30 AM

10T

Habitat 67

This event is sold out.

2.5 Unstructured Learning Hours

Expo 67 was one of the world’s largest universal expositions held in Montreal. Within the movement of liberalization and opening to the world characterizing this period, the exposition was entitled “Man and his World” as the title of Antoine de Saint-Exupéry’s masterpiece. Housing was one of the main themes of Expo 67.

Saint-Exupéry wrote: “We have to make lively this new house that doesn’t have a face yet. The truth for one was to build; it is, for the other, to occupy it.”

Habitat 67 then became a thematic pavilion invaded by thousands of admiring visitors that came from all around the world, on top of being the temporary residence of many dignitaries passing by Montreal.

Habitat 67 was an event in itself at the time. It still is today.
This housing complex became not only the “place where to be” for some 146 singles, couples and families which have made it their main residence, but as well a real community of which the style and the quality of life are envied throughout Canada.

Join George Boynton (resident of 36 years) for a tour of this unique housing complex. George has also done extensive research on Habitat by accessing Safdie’s archives at McQuill University.

8:30 AM - 11:00 AM

11T

Montreal Modern

2.5 Unstructured Learning Hours

In 1962, the remarkable multi-functional Place Ville-Marie launched the era of the tall building in downtown Montreal. Built to fill in the hole created by the 1913 railway tunnel, its connecting tunnel to Central Station is the very earliest piece in what would become Montreal’s underground. The construction of Place Bonaventure in 1967 completes the commercial north-south axis that anchors the revitalized downtown. At the same time, a second, cultural axis is developed to the east with Place des Arts in 1963. This visit links the two and looks at how modernism is evident in today’s Montreal.

This is an architectural walking tour, presented rain or shine. The tour will be offered in English by Heritage Montreal volunteer guides, who have backgrounds in architecture, art history, architectural education or urban planning.

8:30 AM - 11:30 AM

12T

Old Montreal featuring Grand Tour Notre-Dame Basilica

3 Unstructured Learning Hours

This tour is being offered again on Thursday, May 8, 2014 at 8:30 am.

On the edge of Old Montreal you will discover the International Quarter, the new urban space that links the old city to downtown.  Over there, you'll stop to admire an authentic Paris metro entrance, the hot pink "Lipstick Forest" of the Palais des congrès, and the exciting blend of architectural styles housed in the Montréal World Trade Centre. A visit in Old Montréal will help you  discover the 300-plus years of architecture:  St-Helene’s street,  Place d'Armes. Cours Le Royer, Place Jacques Cartier, Bonsecours and St-Paul Streets are good examples of all that variety.  You will visit inside Notre-Dame Basilica, the neo-Gothic masterpiece designed by the Irish-American architect James O'Donnell inspired by St-Luke’s Church in Chelsea.

2:00 PM - 5:00 PM

13T

Hochelaga-Maisonneuve

3 Unstructured Learning Hours

The tour presents the eastern neighbourhood of Hochelaga-Maisonneuve with a significant historical background, when it was created as a separate city in 1883 to later become annexed to the city of Montreal after World War 1. Today, Hochelaga-Maisonneuve features prominent preserved examples of its success in applying ideas of the City Beautiful movement and how such heritage sits within a contemporary context of increasing new development.

Hochelaga-Maisonneuve is today re-experiencing a wind of prosperity, similar to what was experienced at the time of its foundation, with its challenges and opportunities.

This tour highlights the principal historic buildings in the neighbourhood, which includes the Marché Maisonneuve, Caserne LeTourneaux and the abandoned church of Très Saint-Nom-de-Jésus.

Join Intern architect, Emad Ghattas for a 2-hour walking tour of this fascinating Montreal neighbourhood.

2:00 PM - 5:00 PM

14T

Montreal Museum of Fine Arts + Claire and Marc Bourgie Pavilion of Quebec and Canadian Art

3 Unstructured Learning Hours

The Montreal Museum of Fine Arts has one of the highest attendance rates among Canadian museums. Every year, close to 770,000 people visit its unique encyclopedic collection and its original temporary exhibitions, which combine artistic disciplines (fine arts, music, film, fashion, design).

It is also one of Canada's leading publishers of art books in English and French, which are distributed worldwide. Over 100,000 families and school children take part in its educational, cultural and community-oriented programmes each year. The fall of 2011 saw the opening of a fourth pavilion at the Museum – the Claire and Marc Bourgie Pavilion of Quebec and Canadian Art – and a 444-seat concert venue – Bourgie Hall – housing an outstanding collection of Tiffany stained glass windows.

The Claire and Marc Bourgie Pavilion of Quebec and Canadian Art by architects Provencer & Roy Associés Pavilion provides a striking space for the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts with a glass and marble building that creates a “counterpoint” to the existing Erskine and American Church heritage church, engages with the site and establishes a visual connection with Mount Royal.

“The project was complex because it entailed designing a building capable of featuring the Quebec and Canadian art collections while establishing a dialogue with the church, with the museum’s other pavilions, and with the city,” explained Claude Provencher, founding partner of Provencher Roy + Associés Architectes.

From every level, glazed openings offer a view of the surroundings. At the building's foot, the museum's sculpture garden borders the volume. The project has received numerous awards including: 2010 Canadian Architect Awards of Merit, the Grand Prix du design 2011, and the Prix d’excellence 2011 from the Institut de développement urbain, 2012 Award for Architectural Integration of Montreal Architectural Heritage Campains and a 2013 OAA Design Excellence Award.

Join architect Matthieu Jeossrion and Paul Lavallée, Administration Director,  Montreal Museum of Fine Arts for a tour of the museum and the pavilions.

 

 

2:00 PM - 5:00 PM

15T

Plateau Mont-Royal 

3 Unstructured Learning Hours

Close to the downtown area, the Plateau Mont-Royal is the ideal place to discover a residential area of Montreal.

The visit will start with Place Gérald-Godin at the exit of the Mont-Royal metro station.  Located on Mont-Royal Avenue, one of the main arteries of the plateau, you will not only discover a residential area of Montréal but also one of the trendiest districts in North America with its nice boutiques, cafés and restaurants. Plateau Mont-Royal has one of the biggest concentration of vernacular heritage architecture in the world. You will be impressed by its colourful houses, outdoor staircases, little shaded alleys.

Tour Highlights include:

Lafontaine Park, Plateau Mont-Royal’s biggest park, is a 40-hectare gem of traditional park landscaping, it includes two linked ponds with a fountain and waterfalls.

Saint-Denis Street is a shopping heaven where designers along with art shops and bookstores all beckon. 

At Square Saint-Louis you will discover where the early 1800’s French-Canadian elite used to live in lovely Victorian houses, surrounding a romantic park.

 











7:00 PM - 10:30 PM

Celebration of Excellence Awards Ceremony & Dinner

Ben Mulroney

Our Master of Ceremonies, Ben Mulroney is the Host of eTalk and Contributor to Good Morning America. Ben travels the world, interviewing the biggest stars and reporting live from red carpets. As the friendly face ofeTalk, Canada’s popular entertainment show, and contributor to Good Morning America, Mulroney always brings the best to what he does as a speaker, emcee, event moderator, or interviewer, always drawing on his quick wit and natural curiosity to fully delight his live audiences.

As a reporter, Mulroney has covered world-renowned events, such as the Oscars, the Golden Globes, the Emmys, and the Juno Awards. He began his career as a correspondent for The Chatroom, and moved to become the entertainment reporter for Canada AM, before joining eTalk.

The annual OAA Awards highlights the best in architectural design and innovation by Ontario Architects. Winners of the OAA Awards include both emerging talent and some of the provinces' most established architecture practices. Join us in celebrating the achievements of the 2014 award recipients.

The 2014 Awards include:

  • Best Emerging Practice
  • Design Excellence
  • New! Sustainable Design Excellence
  • Concepts
  • G. Randy Roberts Service Award
  • Honour Roll 
  • Landmark Designation
  • Lifetime Design Achievement Award
  • People's Choice Award
  • Order of da Vinci

Remember to invite your colleagues, employees, friends and family to celebrate with you at the Celebration of Excellence. Dress is semi-formal.

12:00 PM - 1:45 PM

Networking Lunch

Here is an opportunity to visit and network with colleagues. A sandwich buffet will be available.

1:00 PM - 1:30 PM

Walking the Talk, OAA HQ meets the 2030 Challenge

Join members of the OAA’s Building Committee for a presentation on the work that has been done to date on the OAA Headquarters Building as well as future renovations aimed at meeting the 2030 Challenge. 

On March 5, 2009 OAA Council demonstrated its strong support for ‘going green’ by adopting the 2030 Challenge. Initially the Challenge was reviewed by the OAA’s Sustainable Built Environments Committee (SBEC) and recommended to Council that it adopt the 2030 Challenge:

To avoid catastrophic climate change, the growth rate of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions must firstly be slowed and then reversed over the next 10 years. The key to keeping global warming under one degree centigrade (°C) above today's level will require immediate action and a concerted global effort. To accomplish this The 2030 Challenge asks the global architecture and building community to adopt a series of targets.

Buildings are the major source of demand for energy and materials that produce by-product greenhouse gases (GHG).To accomplish this, Architecture 2030 has issued The 2030 Challenge asking the global architecture and building community to adopt the following targets:

  • All new buildings, developments and major renovations shall be designed to meet a fossil fuel, GHG-emitting, energy consumption performance standard of 50% of the regional (or country) average for that building type.

  • At a minimum, an equal amount of existing building area shall be renovated annually to meet a fossil fuel, GHG-emitting, energy consumption performance standard of 50% of the regional (or country) average for that building type.

  • The fossil fuel reduction standard for all new buildings and major renovations shall be increased to: 60% in 2010 70% in 2015 80% in 2020 90% in 2025 Carbon-neutral in 2030 (using no fossil fuel GHG emitting energy to operate). These targets may be accomplished by implementing innovative sustainable design strategies, generating on-site renewable power and/or purchasing (20% maximum) renewable energy and/or certified renewable energy credits.

Since 2009 successive OAA Councils have continued to support the 2030 Challenge and in 2012/13 agreed, in principle, to move forward with renovations to the OAA Building to meet these targets.

The OAA Council is currently considering options that would allow the OAA Headquarters to achieve the requirements of the 2030 Challenge or, even more aggressively, net-zero.  OAA Council feels strongly about demonstrating leadership in the area of sustainable design through the profession’s Headquarters Building and would like to demonstrate to the design and construction industry what can be achieved with a building that is predominately curtain wall in terms of energy efficiency.  

Please join the Building Committee over the lunch time on Friday to learn more and participate in the 2030 Challenge discussion. 

6:00 PM - 7:00 PM

President's Reception

During this elegant cocktail reception be sure to see the exhibit of winners of the 2014 OAA Awards. Come, relax and enjoy the company of your colleagues. A great beginning to an evening of celebration.