Candidates

Each electoral district is assigned a specific number of seats within Council. Only architects with an address of record within the electoral district can vote for candidates running for those seats. If you are unsure of the electoral district to which you belong, please verify your address of record and consult our electoral district map

Architects can nominate and vote for Architects, Licensed Technologist OAA, and Intern Architects.

Licensed Technologist OAA can nominate and vote for the Licensed Technologist OAA Seat.
 
Intern Architects can nominate and vote for the Intern Architect Non-Voting Seat.

Candidates will be announced once the nomination process is complete. At that point, visit the OAA’s Ask the Candidates page and submit a question (prior to the beginning of the voting period November 9). Candidates will be forwarded all questions and their responses will be posted below.

Click below to see all candidates per electoral district as well links to their candidate statements and answers to your questions.

Please Note: Answers have not been received by all candidates. Responses will be updated as received.

Eastern Ontario

Total seats: 2
Seats available: 1

Nupur Charavorty (Candidate Statement)
Christopher Howard (Candidate Statement)
Lara McKendrick  (Candidate Statement)
Chun Wang (Candidate Statement)

 



CANDIDATE QUESTIONS & ANSWERS

Q1. Will you support the development of a national architecture policy for Canada and what specifically will you do, at the council level, to support awareness of the architecture policy initiative and, more broadly, do to raise awareness about the importance of architecture to society as a whole?

Q2. Geographic representation is important in the governance of the association. This is why six electoral districts are established in Regulation 27. Voting is restricted so that one can only vote for the Province of Ontario district and their district of record. Given that Councilors do not, in fact, represent these electoral districts, do you think allowing all members to vote for all electoral districts would be beneficial to the association? (candidates would still need to have an address of record in the district to run)

Q3. Are there other ways to engage the membership to increase participation in elections and governance?



Nupur Charavorty (Answers below)

A1. I will support the development of national architecture policy for Canada, because I see the policy as the key to informing contracting authorities and clients of the best that the practice of Architecture can offer for our unique country, province and region. As architects, it helps us share best practices, learn from each other and add our unique insights. Specifically:

· To improve awareness among the clients: On one hand, we should emphasize the uniqueness Canadian identity, and how the habitat is a central precept of it. Therefore, to have a policy for the same is elemental. On the other hand, we should boil down the           benefits into tangible differences that we already have evidence of (e.g. EU).
· I would advocate the policy show its potential effectiveness by gathering feedback and offering paths (in form of white papers) to solve some of the most pressing problems that face our nation today—Indigenous habitation, rural homes, underserved urban        cores etc.
· Finally, I would hope as part of the policy we find ways to increase participation in architecture by students and Interns. We should lobby governments and universities to increase funding for these foundational groups.

A2. While councilors are expected to represent the province as a whole, being best informed of the local issues, that often are not adequately captured in the conversation, is the only way to an equitable province wide platform in the OAA. Otherwise, given the diversity of districts and the disparity of size it will be very easy, for smaller interests to be marginalized.

A3. I think engaging students into the process early, and often is needed to increase grass root participation. Offers to mentor, train, engage them in their terms would increase participation and inject fresh ideas that we all need. We need to answer the basic questions better – why get registered, why write the tests etc. Interns, that play a vital role in our practice, need to be engaged more. In many ways, we need to make the OAA less ivory tower and more pragmatic. We need to provide a two-way communication channel with interns and students that help them understand the new realities and challenges they will face once they are registered architects.




Christopher Howard (Answers below)

A1. Fundamentally yes, this idea aligns with a core mandate of the OAA, so it’s not hard to imagine supporting this at a national level. However, I believe that the promotion of architecture begins locally. As such an initiative is fleshed out, I would hope to see what national leverage could be used to support the provincial and municipal efforts in this regard. Ontario East has a lot of architecture to be celebrated, as well as many talented architects who deserve recognition for their work. Using  my background in marketing and advertising, I believe I could help find ways to communicate the importance of architecture to society – articles in the lay press, for example, or videos showing vignettes of local architects confronting social challenges with elegant solutions. Many of the best architects do not have the time to promote themselves. Finding ways to do that for them and promote the importance of architecture in society at the same time would be an interesting and worthwhile challenge. 

A2. I am uncertain as to why voting was established the way it was,  but it seems to make sense that someone voting in Eastern Ontario, for example, should not have the power to affect what’s going on in Western Ontario, unless there is a province-wide matter policy or initiative requiring attention. 

A3. This is complicated, and I know enough to know I don’t know the answer. The challenge of engaging extremely busy people in anything is not unique.  To discover how to be relevant and efficient with messaging and services in order to garner quick, simple responses from OAA membership may require some outside help.  Someone to ask questions like: are emails the best way to communicate when they have a low degree of importance next to a geotechnical report, for example?” “Would people use an OAA application on their phone, and what tools might it have?” Exploring how other industries engage their membership, and looking to an outside organization to help better understand the demographics and needs of the membership represent important next steps.




Lara McKendrick (Answers below)

A1.
Yes, I do support the development of a national architecture policy for Canada. The existing efforts of CALA, CCUSA and the RAIC need to be made more known to architects, our government, and the general public.  There is rising public interest in a higher quality built environment and awareness of its effect on our well being, however; the well designed public spaces and places we admire in other countries and the high profile of nordic, UK, French, and Spanish design and architecture is the result of government supported policy and education within those countries.  The OAA can provide support to CALA, CCUSA and the RAIC through making OAA members aware of their progress via existing member communications channels, advocating on behalf in locales where the OAA has a stronger voice, and supporting their efforts financially (as required and appropriate).  

A2
. I do not think that opening up voting to all members to vote in all regions to be beneficial to the association.  OAA members from all districts must engage with and participate in the OAA (in some capacity and at various times throughout their career) in order for our organization to remain relevant to all members.  By allowing members to vote on every district does no service to this effort.

A3.
I think it is important for the members of council to connect with as many members within their district as possible (new and not so new); to find out what is important to them, what their concerns are, update them on OAA goings on, and to engage them in the conversation.  This may be via society visits, conferences (hopefully in-person soon!), local architecture events, one-on-one conversations or social media.  We need to take pride in our self governing status and be reminded, on a personal level, that this is both a privilege and a responsibility.



Chun Wang 
(Answers below)

 
A1. I definitely would like to support. The thing I would like to do the most to support is to increase the recognition of the architect, since the architect is the only key member who can influence the "awareness of the architecture".  How can we expect the public and society to value architecture's importance if Architect is an unknown or failure profession? How can we expect the public value architecture? how can we promote "architecture" without a bunch of successful architects who are proud of themselves? As architects in a small architectural practice, we're facing a lot of challenges and difficulties, lots of them are shared among all the small businesses,  for example "to attract high quality clients and to get larger projects/orders". But the most difficult situation an architect is facing in small business is "being recognized", by the public, by society and most importantly by the potential clients. This is very special and different from other businesses, since the clients behind larger projects usually don't have this issue because they're mostly professionals to handle the projects. But for the majority of the small projects, especially from the private sector, the clients behind are generally lack of the knowledge and recognition of the importance of the architect's work. So many times, the clients don't even know what an architect does and why they're requested by authority for an architect to help their projects. We have too much work to do, to advocate, to educate our potential clients before we actually deal with the real project or business. That's all because of OAA hasn't done this work systematically and strategically as an organization, so it ends up being a very heavy burden to every single architect who wants to practice by himself, who is not willing to stick with the large corp. It's not only unfair and it's also less efficient and less effective. At this situation, in order to "raise awareness about the importance of architecture" we have to start from increasing the "recognition of architects" first.
I disagree that "educating the public to recognize architects as a profession" is out of the scope of work from OAA, I copied the items from " Additional object" and "By-law" from "Architect Act". It really depends on how you interpret them and what strategy you would like to use to approach them as an organization. 
   "4. To establish and maintain or to assist in the establishment and maintenance of classes, schools, exhibitions or lectures in, and to promote public appreciation of, architecture and the allied arts and sciences." 
   "21. authorizing the making of grants for any purpose that may tend to advance knowledge of architectural education, or maintain or improve the standards of practice in architecture or support and encourage public information and interest in the role of architecture in society;" 


A2.
I agree to allow all members to vote, since the candidate may not only be known in local society, they can be well recognized among the entire province and what they do will not only impact the local members but to all in the province. 


A3. To count " participation" into the CE hours, it's actually a part of the learning/teaching (spread influence to others) process, and also involves the management.
 

 

Central Ontario

Total seats: 2
Seats available: 0

Northern Ontario

Total seats: 1 
Seats available: 0

Western Ontario

Total seats: 2
Seats available: 0

City of Toronto

Total seats: 4
Seats available: 2

Farida Abu-Bakare (Candidate Statement)
James R. Anderson 
(Candidate Statement)
D’Arcy M. Arthurs (Candidate Statement)
Victoria Beltrano (Candidate Statement)
Ryan Cyrus
 (Candidate Statement)
Kristiana Schuhmann (Candidate Statement
Angus Skene (Candidate Statement)



CANDIDATE QUESTIONS & ANSWERS

Q1. Will you support the development of a national architecture policy for Canada and what specifically will you do, at the council level, to support awareness of the architecture policy initiative and, more broadly, do to raise awareness about the importance of architecture to society as a whole?

Q2. Geographic representation is important in the governance of the association. This is why six electoral districts are established in Regulation 27. Voting is restricted so that one can only vote for the Province of Ontario district and their district of record. Given that Councilors do not, in fact, represent these electoral districts, do you think allowing all members to vote for all electoral districts would be beneficial to the association? (candidates would still need to have an address of record in the district to run)

Q3. Are there other ways to engage the membership to increase participation in elections and governance?



Farida Abu-Bakare 
(Answers below)

A1. My core mission as an architect is to find ways to engage and inspire communities to not just pay attention to good design but to understand its immeasurable value and persistently seek it out. A national architecture policy would normalize the role architecture and design plays in our society, because as designers we are not often taught the importance of educating the communities that empower our design decisions. 
At BAIDA (Black Architecture and Interior Designers Association) we are constantly looking for opportunities to cultivate, mentor and educate the next generation of designers. Broadening access and awareness to architecture and interior design is one of the main directives of our organization. We have learned from experience that people and community, not policy are the true agents of change that lead the way to create powerful buildings and civic spaces that are environmentally responsible and culturally vibrant. 

As a council member at OAA, I would continue to explore how we can lead these directives at a provincial level to join the dialogue with CALA/CCUSA, while partnering with RAIC at a national level. Architecture is steadily ambitious and if we continue to strive for more inclusive built environments, design can contribute to a more sustainable, equal, and less segregated society.

A2. Sufficient representation allows districts to not only feel represented but allows them to easily express their requests and requirements of their councilors. Due to the infinite sizes and population of the regions that house the six electoral districts within the province of Ontario, voting should remain restricted. There is a limited relation between focus and inclusion, and every district has their own local interests and issues. 
As candidates this relationship to their respective district would inspire confidence in their leadership and would represent a level of accountability to be able to respond to local residents’ questions and concerns. Allowing all OAA members to vote for all electoral districts outside their own would dissuade the focus of local affairs concerning each district.

A3. Our diversity is what makes us strong as individuals, but our collective voice is what makes us powerful as a community. The OAA should be leading by example and fostering an environment where regardless of age, gender, economic standing, race, sexual identity or disability, members can feel welcome to participate and contribute to the voice of their community. 
Establishing a more diverse OAA Council would be a first step in disrupting the systematic discrimination and bias that is present within our architecture and design community. OAA members cannot assume confidence in a council that they cannot see themselves in or relate to. Once there is improved representation a more open discourse between OAA members and OAA Council will gradually occur as this will cultivate a renewed interest in the importance of governance, the power of community engagement, and the impacts of voter participation. 



James R. Anderson  (Answers not yet provided)


D’Arcy M. Arthurs (Answers below)

A1.
 I do support the broad reaching goals of a national architecture policy.  I believe that as designers, clients, and society as a whole, we are beginning to integrate sustainability, resilience, and environment wellbeing more consistently in our work, a national policy is a logical next step. At Council, I would support ongoing dialogue between the OAA and the joint CALA/CCUSA task forces in the development of this initiative. I also believe that the RAIC will need to take a strong leadership role to ensure national support and success.
 
A2. 
This change to the voting regulation would require careful investigation.  I believe the current regulation allows a balance of local and provincial Councilors and specifically, the election district Councilors by members who recognize the character and experience of their local candidate. Members voting across all districts could skew the election results because of population density.

A3.
I believe that more regular open dialogue ‘Town Hall’ meetings between members and Council would increase understanding of governance, engagement and hopefully participation. 



Victoria Beltrano
 (Answers not yet provided)
Ryan Cyrus
 (Answers not yet provided)



Kristiana Schuhmann 
(Answers below)

A1.
I support the development of a national architectural policy, and if elected to Council will vote positively on issues that will propel it further into the spotlight. Having read an early draft, it’s not a problem-solving manual for architects, rather a broad visionary statement to help guide decision-makers and professionals at all levels of government. It will help the public to understand the value that architecture brings and can create a culture where design excellence is in demand. Isn’t that what we want as Architects? - to have educated patrons who are excited about the possibilities of what we can do. 

A2.
When FIFA enacted the backpass rule to discourage defensive time-wasting they changed the face of the game by making players more proficient and the game more exciting. I would support giving this voting method a shot because sometimes making a few small rule changes can have a big impact. I acknowledge that as a resident of Toronto I’m most knowledgeable about the needs of my immediate community, however; through work I travel and administer projects all over the Province. So what happens in other electoral districts directly affects my work. Additionally, a lot of smaller municipalities look towards Toronto’s policies and processes to inform their operational models. If there is this cross influence across the Province, then it would make a case to allow for all members to vote in all electoral districts. 

A3.
Voter turnout makes a huge difference in the election process, putting in the right candidates in the right seats and thus catapulting the direction of Council for the year. Proven strategies to increase participation such as “pledging to vote” can help remind busy professionals of their commitment. This could be a simple email with a yes/no survey asking members to vote in the upcoming election. Another strategy could be to offer Con-Ed hours for voting. Reading the Candidate statements and the Q&A section takes time and effort, and involves a level of self-education.



Angus Skene 
(Answers below)

A1. 
I know next to nothing about the National Architecture Policy but I will always be for fewer rules, fewer restrictions, and fewer policies. So, while I would do my best to bring myself up to speed if elected to Council, I would say it’s pretty unlikely I would advocate for a National Architecture Policy. I am aware of the possible benefits to the quality of the built environment such a policy may yield but I simply value the freedom of individuals to make their  own decisions higher than anything I or my colleagues might prefer to see in the built environment.  I would say further that Canada is a federation of provinces where unity from coast to coast to coast is arguably not even the point of the country. Furthermore, the Federation is set up so that most of legislative powers over buildings and planning rests with provincial and lesser governments so it seems unlikely such a policy could have any regulatory teeth. Add to that the jealousy that our many regions have over the powers they have – and the OAA is a of course a provincial body first and a national player second – I find the realisation of such a Policy unlikely. I would likely maintain this opinion even if somehow the N.A.P. promised to yield new and profitable business for Ontario architects.   
 
Regarding the second question I would say that other than plying my trade in a professional manner I have no immediate plans to raise awareness about the importance of architecture to anyone. Should I be elected to the OAA council and should such a opportunity present itself my modest experience creating and hosting television programs about buildings and cities tells me that any such attempts must be delivered through mass popular media in ways that are approachable and entertaining. I would also add that I have seldom heard the OAA consulted on media stories regarding buildings and have always wondered if that could be remedied. The CBC for example always seems to trot off to interview Jack Diamond or Moshe Safdie – which is fine - but for legal and medical stories the always seems to go to the OMA and the Law Society. It would be nice if the OAA could position itself better for that. 

A2. 
I simply do not know enough about the pros and cons of these voting options to offer an intelligent opinion but I do know this -  the elections were likely set up this way for some very good reasons. I may be naive, but the little I know about constitutional law tells me that voting systems – as odd as they may seem sometimes - are usually underpinned by attempts at fairness and so I will assume this OAA system was deemed the most fair at the time. If this is, (or becomes), a live issue for the OAA Council I would need to make a detailed study of past elections and outcomes to make any meaningful contribution to the discussion. Doing that on my end sounds like a ton of work to do properly - so I would need to be pretty convinced there was a real structural problem to advocate for any pursuit of the issue at that level.
 
A3. 
Voter participation is a perennial issue with elections. Low turn-out is sometimes interpreted as okay as well – as it may simply indicate that most people think things are fine, so they don't need to bother paying attention to the election. There may indeed be some truth to that idea, but 'assuming' we want to increase interest and turn-out the only thing that comes to mind is to somehow incentivise participation. I would guess that some people may already be collecting 'self-directed' con-ed  points by saying they follow the candidates and actually put thought into their vote but if there was a way to systematize those activities and get 'Directed' points for doing them I think there might be some eager take-up by more members. Maybe that's already possible but I kind of doubt it. I also wonder if a contest would help – like maybe one voter an election will have their License fee or Certificate of Practice Fee waived or something like that.   







Province of Ontario

Total seats: 4
Seats available: 2 

Salam Al-Durra (Candidate Statement)
J. William Birdsell (Candidate Statement)

Giulio Bruno (Candidate Statement)
G. Laurence Cudlip (Candidate Statement)                                                          
Ellie Cyrus  Withdrawn
Richard Webb Dabrus (Candidate Statement)
Allison Gonsalves  (Candidate Statement)
John V. Hrovat (Candidate Statement)
Anwar Ktecha (Candidate Statement)
Mohammad Reza Moghaddam Nik (Candidate Statement)
Deo Paquette (Candidate Statement)
Dinko Sakanovic (Candidate Statement)
Jelena Savic-Brkic (Candidate Statement)
Sanskriti Singh (Candidate Statement)
Fei Wei (Candidate Statement)




CANDIDATE QUESTIONS & ANSWERS

Q1. Will you support the development of a national architecture policy for Canada and what specifically will you do, at the council level, to support awareness of the architecture policy initiative and, more broadly, do to raise awareness about the importance of architecture to society as a whole?

Q2. Geographic representation is important in the governance of the association. This is why six electoral districts are established in Regulation 27. Voting is restricted so that one can only vote for the Province of Ontario district and their district of record. Given that Councilors do not, in fact, represent these electoral districts, do you think allowing all members to vote for all electoral districts would be beneficial to the association? (candidates would still need to have an address of record in the district to run)

Q3. Are there other ways to engage the membership to increase participation in elections and governance?




Salam Al-Durra 
(Answers not yet provided)



J. William Birdsell 
(Answers below)

A1.
I strongly support the National Architecture Policy for Canada.  I have embraced all the Policy information and have spoken widely about the initiative.  It is important to promote architecture to all Canadians and engage with our government leaders to gain acceptance for this critical idea.  A few years ago the Province rewrote the arts curriculum for Ontario's schools.  Architecture vanished from the curriculum.  I have spoken with MPP's at every opportunity including at the World Architecture events that the OAA hosts each year at Queen's Park.  Each time I advocate for the Policy and for them to reverse their unfortunate, wrong headed decision regarding our children.  It is important to stress architecture's role as a language that can speak to people everyday and elicit an emotional response just like any art.  An appreciation of architecture may lead to valuing the work differently and may result in more quality based selection of architects as opposed to the usual bottom line cost decision.  It may even result in architectural competitions that encourage an exploration of ideas shaping architecture and society's opinions. 

A2.
I feel that recognizing the diversity of location and the resulting difference of opinion is an important aspect of the makeup of OAA Council.  It is important to be engaged with your locality and the Architects that practice in your community.  I have travelled the Province and across Canada speaking with Architects about the issues that affect them and their view of the profession.  I do that with the understanding that I must bring those ideas and concerns back to the council table where they can be shared and shape our direction as we discuss the matters on which the OAA must decide.  I do this work with a deep understanding shaped by these discussions and those that I had as a past ProDemnity Chair all the while being proud of coming from Guelph.  

A3.
I act to encourage discussion about architecture each day through my writing in national and provincial publications and media.  It is up to the OAA to promote its elections and the resulting action is political.  I have always lived by the rule that all politics is local and best pursued one conversation at a time whether in person or more recently through social engagement.




Giulio Bruno 
(Answers below)

A1. One of the objects of our Association, as stated in the Ontario Architects Act, is “to promote public appreciation of architecture and the allied arts and sciences”, and both the OAA and the RAIC have always worked in this direction. There are also quite a few other institutions that contribute to spreading awareness about the importance of architects and architecture in our society. Nevertheless, the results are not as encouraging as we would like.
I think the OAA - in conjunction with the other provincial association, CALA, and RAIC - should work on obtaining the promulgation of an “Architecture Act” similar to the ones already existing in France (1977), Sweden (1998), Spain (2017), and Campania (2019), for example. It would be a great tool to effectively promote – in our profession - quality, sustainability, affordability, livability, education, research, competition, and social awareness about the real importance of our work.
It is an ambitious project but can be done. In the immediate, we could establish a specific super-committee to collect and coordinate information, determine objectives, build strategies, and propose concrete actions for the affirmation of a national architecture policy in our country. Absolutely.

A2.
Our profession is not the same in the wide provincial territory and, therefore, it is a good idea to have local representatives that have more direct knowledge of the local conditions. Nevertheless, all representatives work for the same common goal, which is the wellbeing of our profession as a whole.

A3.
The OAA regularly publishes an interesting Bulletin about ongoing activities and is present on socials like Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram. We can work with our Communications Committee to improve the use of these tools and ask our associates to provide suggestions about that. We also have a lot of active committees, and they are great places to directly participate in the life of our association. We should work to improve their visibility and better communicate what they actually do. It would be interesting to have meeting sessions open to all the associates willing to attend. Finally, we have a “Digital Suggestion Box” to give feedback and suggestions, and we could make it more visible on our web site.




G. Laurence Cudlip 
(Answers below)

A1. Yes I will support this notion of a national architecture policy for Canada. Engaging with colleagues in other provincial associations and the RAIC to create consensus and a framework to develop the policy would by my first major goal. Awareness should be established in the form of regular email newsletter to all members on the development of that as a whole. In the broader context, raising awareness could include more public exposure with events aimed at showing the public how key design is. Establishing architecture week each year around the time of the OAA annual convention with high profile public events is one idea I would like to promote.
 
A2. I think a more open form of voting is a beneficial thing.

A3. Engagement is always a challenge. Having an in-person meet the candidates type of scenario (post COVID) might be a good way to help with participation as one idea. A canned video presentation by each candidate could also help with the engagement. Regular Town Halls during the tenure would also be a great way to help engage the architectural community regarding governance.
 



Ellie Cyrus  
Withdrawn



Richard Webb Dabrus 
(Answers below)

A1. The question seems to about advocacy, as from a regulatory perspective all professions are licensed by the province or jurisdiction, the licensing is not a federal matter. On advocacy, the RAIC is the most likely candidate for a national perspective, however it's funding is limited.  At present in Ontario, a major portion of our annual fees are used for advocacy.  If these funds were redirected to the RAIC, that body may be able to provide a broader national perspective, and approach to advocacy.

A2.
Regional representation is more than reasonable, and only local representation should be allowed for each district. Once on Council, everyone's voice and vote counts.
Simply establishing an address would be in violation of the Architects Act, and would be in violation of the intention of the Act.



Allison Gonsalves
 (Answers below)

A1. I appreciate the thoughtful question, however, I cannot comment on my support for a policy that I am unaware of. I would, however, support a unifying national architectural standards if it respect the needs and goals of each province. Architecture has a tremendous role to play in society and as a person, I encourage members to get involved with their municipalities and connect with their city councillors to bring awareness of the impact that architecture has on a community and to our country.

A2. I respect the way that the system has been established, as I am sure there are deliberate reasons why Councillors and electoral districts are set up in its current state. If chosen as a Councillor, I would need to educate myself on these reasons before developing an opinion.
 
A3
. Yes, there are always ways to further engage members to participate in elections. I believe social media has a huge role to play in many architectural firms, and using this tool and the various social platforms could be a way to promote elections. Webinars could also be established regarding the importance of a governing body and the Architectural Council. 



John V. Hrovat (Answers not yet provided)

A1. I would be in support of the development of a national architectural policy that encourages well-designed environments that enhance the triple bottom line of Social, Environmental and Economic well-being. At the council level I would support awareness of the initiative by promoting a dialogue with governing agencies and allied professionals toward a holistic understanding of what “best value” in architecture means and not simply lowest bid.  At the level of society as a whole, this needs to be nurtured in collaboration and coordination with local societies that form the grass roots of the OAA.

A2. I agree that geographic representation is very important in the governance of the association.  In my opinion the representation on Council in the capacity of the Province of Ontario district is less about regional representation and more about having the right team in place focused on advancing the status, competency and value of the profession and its members to the public at large.

A3. I have always believed participation is very much a personal desire to engage.  That said it also holds that people look to issues that speak to them and encourage their involvement.  To that end, inclusive conversations in person or virtual such as round tables, townhalls, etc. about compelling issues that impact the association can only help those that have the desire to engage and those that are open to it find a path to participate on important issues at hand.

 



Anwar Ktecha 
(Answers not yet provided)



Mohammad Reza Moghaddam Nik 
(Answers below)

A1. I definitely support a national architecture policy for canada and as a councilor I will focus on getting the word out on the provincial level and extending to a federal level with the help of other provincial associations and the RAIC.  I believe most architects are still unclear about what it is, and what it can do for the profession.  I have been advocating for the importance of architecture as long as I've been involved in it, I truly believe that a better means of communication is needed in order to bring more focus on the larger implications of what we do and what we can do.  I will make sure to bring these important conversations to the council and develop improved strategies to raise awareness.  Architecture is important, and at the moment not many non-architects are convinced that it is.  

A2. No, I don't believe that allowing all members to vote for all electoral districts would be beneficial.  This is a question of who knows what's best for their district, and the presumptions that someone who isn't familiar with their district could potentially be making decisions on the residents' behalf isn't something I would advocate for.  We need to reach out local voices to help with making decisions that potentially affect us all within the province.  

A3. Yes, I believe that more outreach with other organizations, institutions, and community-based groups would help in understanding the role of the OAA council and architects at large. At the moment, I know most architects don't really know what the implications of these elections are and whether it really matters for them to vote or not.  We need more boots on the ground and more representation from our colleagues, our students and those who love architecture.  We need to show the power of architecture - even though advocacy is meant to be the role of the RAIC, it doesn't mean that the OAA and anyone involved in the profession can't advocate for the betterment of all.  I will make sure that we form meaningful partnerships with fresh energy and I am sure we will increase the participation.  We need to if we want to do the things we all desire so deeply as architects and city-builders. 



Deo Paquette 
(Answers not yet provided)



Dinko Sakanovic 
(Answers below)

A1.
I am not opposed to the idea of a Canadian national architecture policy in principle, and would certainly support developing one under the right circumstances, although developing a provincial policy first may prove a more controllable, less lofty goal, and could serve as a stepping stone towards an eventual national policy.  At the moment, however, I am of the opinion that in order for any policy of that sort to be effective in a significant way, it would probably have to be somewhat enforceable, otherwise it will in all likelihood end up another obscure document that few people would ever be compelled to reference.  In order to pave the way for an effective provincial or national policy that would be taken seriously by our architects, prospective clients, and government officials at various levels, we may first have to consider re-assessing (and possibly addressing), a number of smaller, but cumulatively significant legislated conditions currently in force, which may be standing in the way to some extent.  If I am elected to the council, I intend to raise such issues for discussion, and hopefully, if there is substantial agreement among other council members, subsequent appropriate action could follow.

A2. If I understand correctly, the Councillors do not represent the electoral districts, but they do represent issues and concerns that may be more prominent in their particular districts, compared to the rest of the province.  As any rule, policy, or regulation applies equally to the entirety of the province once adopted, it is important that all views and objections, coming from any part of the province, are fully considered by the Council before adoption is finalized.  The members living and working in a given district are inherently more qualified to amongst themselves elect a candidate they believe would best represent their unique concerns.  Allowing all members to vote for all electoral districts will add nothing to result in "better" candidates (whatever that means) being elected to the Council, but would have the potential to generate unintended incentives that could over time homogenize the type of issues being brought to the Council's attention, likely leading to some parts of the province having their unique needs neglected during policy shaping.  What's unacceptable for a part of the province is unacceptable for the entire province.  Therefore, I am not convinced that such a proposition would be beneficial to the association in the long run, and would not support its implementation.

A3. Yes, I believe that the association needs to shore up its advocacy efforts in order to encourage more participation among those Members with fresh new ideas, but reluctant to do so due to some degree of learned helplessness, or perhaps cynicism towards bureaucracy.  This could be done in a number of different ways, one of which would be to inject more advocacy-minded argumentation directly into the Council.  I would propose that at least three Councillors be randomly assigned and tasked, for a period of, let's say, one year each at some point during their three-year tenure on the Council, to focus their contributions to the various policy discussions exclusively on representing the interests of the profession and its members alone, in a "devil's advocate" manner (i.e. without regard to the interests of the public - balancing that out would be the job of the rest of the Council, as it is currently).  Such an approach would give any given prospective Councillor a high chance of having their ideas properly heard and discussed, which could go a long way to encourage more critical and creative thinkers to put their names forward.




Jelena Savic-Brkic 
(Answers below)

A1. It is crucial to continue building on the foundations laid by CALA, CCUSA and RAIC. 
I often get a question of why buildings in Europe are better designed? Many European countries adopted national architecture policies in '90  that enabled professionals to achieve design excellence and public appreciation. A national policy would help cultivate Canadian public interest in designing a built environment, promoting our Canadian architecture. 

Many of our current policies and standards overlap on major issues national policy is intending to tackle. Social-cultural aspects, well-being, equity, resiliency and sustainable growth conversations are critical in pushing architecture forward, particularly towards meeting The 2030 Challenge.

If we have national and provincial building codes that set a basis for minimum enforceable technical standards, we should have a maximum or best achievable standard. 

Architecture has evolved significantly with the ever-changing client landscape and stakeholder engagement norms. We are more than designers of the marvellous public realm, creators of iconic buildings and urban experiences. Subways, airports, hospitals, industrial and process facilities, shopping malls are also architecture. We should celebrate architects in all spheres of architecture, public and private sector, finance, development, design, and construction. We are not just a pretty face! We have a social responsibility to build a safe and healthy environment, to serve and protect the public interest while promoting architecture appreciation.

For those interested in 2030 Challenge, here is more info:
https://architecture2030.org/2030_challenges/2030-challenge/
https://raic.org/sites/raic.org/files/involvement/documents/2030factsheet_e.pdf
https://alliance2030.ca/about/
https://www.c40.org/cities
https://www.2030districts.org/toronto/district-team


A2. There is always a good reason for our predecessors' work, how electoral districts are established and voting limitations imposed. Understanding more on this approach, having further input on the matter would be essential in providing a proper answer. 

Analyzing the latest Covid survey data, it is evident that most members are located in the City of Toronto electoral boundaries (58%), and a solid 38% are located in the outskirts, suburbs or rural farmland. My interest as a member of the City of Toronto electorate was running for the Province of Ontario, understanding the bigger picture, and how electoral districts connect. If I get elected to the Council, I will investigate the subject of voting limitations and potential benefits to the association.  


A3. Absolutely. We have the privilege to be self-regulated. The participation of volunteers and members of the profession to help meet the organization's mandate is paramount.
Members engagement is leading to more content leading to more activity.

My first passion wasn't architecture but tech. I am a witness to what data-driven user society we have become. We have to fight for our members' attention on various fronts: digital - diversity - inclusion. 
We should continue building awareness utilizing all marketing platforms to make OAA #trending #approachable, shift advertising perspective, provide more data content, and advance social media use. Some platforms have a mass potential for cross-generational outreach and inclusion, such as LinkedIn.  It is essential to balance ideas and experience, making all members feel welcomed. 

Personally, running for council stem comes from the desire to contribute and continue to diversify our representation on Council, not only as a woman in the field but also as an outsider with foreign experience and credentials. Being voted on Council helps bring another layer of diversity and perhaps encourage other practitioners with similar backgrounds to feel accepted and engaged.

Finally, we must continue building the current OAA work on inclusion. Gender, race, age, accessibility are all part of social inclusivity and matters where our regulatory body has an opportunity to improve and serve in the best public interest.




Sanskriti Singh
 (Answers below)

A1. 
If elected on the Council, I will work towards the development and implementation of a national architecture policy with the aim of raising the standards for design quality and reinforcing the importance of architecture in achieving sustainable, accessible and inclusive society. This can be achieved through national design competitions, which will initiate a discussion on architecture and will raise the profile of architects / architectural professionals and their work. In addition, this can also be accomplished through public consultations on the design of buildings in the public realm through the engagement of Canadians in discussions about their built environment. Lastly, I will work towards strengthening investment in architecture and design of public buildings by lobbying public and private organisations. 


A2. 
In my opinion, allowing all members to vote for all electoral districts will not be beneficial to the association. I believe that to effect change, members should have a right to have their voice heard at a provincial level and at a community level, where they are located. As such, I believe that for the electoral districts, both the candidates and the members voting for them should be located in the same electoral district to be able to bring community issues to the forefront in addition to participating in province level discussions relating to the future of architecture and the profession. This way, the councillors from electoral district will represent their electoral district and its membership, by whose vote they have received their mandate.  

If elected to the Council, I will work towards engaging the membership and council with the aim of clarifying the role of councillors and their representation of the electoral district from which they have been elected. 

A3.
Critical to an efficiently functioning organisation/ association is an engaged and informed membership. In my opinion, to increase their participation in elections and in governance of the association, information sessions should be organised that provide an overview to governance structure of the association. New members could be encouraged to better understand the structure of the association through continued mentorship (after registration) by seasoned members. Lastly, to pique the interest of members, observers from amongst the membership can be appointed to the Council for a specified period in order to witness the decision-making process and to learn about the structure and governance of the association. Another way to engage the membership in governance is include volunteering in association activities and mentorship programs towards continuing education.  



Fei Wei 
(Answers not yet provided)


 

Province of Ontario - Licensed Technologist OAA

Total seats: 1
Seats available: 1

Brian Abbey (Candidate Statement)
James Janzer 
(Candidate Statement)
Jennifer King (Candidate Statement)
Nicola Russo (Candidate Statement)
Dana Seguin (Candidate Statement)



CANDIDATE QUESTIONS & ANSWERS

Q1. Will you support the development of a national architecture policy for Canada and what specifically will you do, at the council level, to support awareness of the architecture policy initiative and, more broadly, do to raise awareness about the importance of architecture to society as a whole?

Q2. Geographic representation is important in the governance of the association. This is why six electoral districts are established in Regulation 27. Voting is restricted so that one can only vote for the Province of Ontario district and their district of record. Given that Councilors do not, in fact, represent these electoral districts, do you think allowing all members to vote for all electoral districts would be beneficial to the association? (candidates would still need to have an address of record in the district to run)

Q3. Are there other ways to engage the membership to increase participation in elections and governance?




Brian Abbey (Answers not yet provided)



James Janzer 
(Answers below)

A1. A national architecture policy for Canada has long-been debated, and it is time that we move towards making this policy initiative a reality. A national architecture policy could create a framework for which we can test our projects against – site placement, design, and process, amongst other pieces. This strategy would set goals for the whole country and shed some light on what the built environment says about us as Canadians. At the council level, I believe it is thrust upon us to be stewards of good architecture, to inform and discover from, and with, our peers, and establish a forum with stepping stones for so that this policy can be realized. 

A2. While I believe it is important that our council reflects the regional diversity and geographic specifics of each district, I do not support voting from outside of the local districts. Of importance are regional issues, and in many cases, it is the local community that understands those needs best. Having outside voters exhibit influence on a district out of their region may lead to inappropriate outcomes that do not address local issues. However, while I would currently reject a change to this voting regulation, I would be open to engage in discussion through a lens of caution for this proposed change. 

A3. Further diversification of our community, more civic engagement, and fostering environments that invite participation and positive discourse during seminars and talks would drum up more interest and engage our active and future membership. Offering platforms where people feel heard are proven ways to increase engagement, irrespective of the topic or discipline.   



Jennifer King 
(Answers below)

A1.
I support a national architecture policy for Canada and would support any initiatives that come from it. I would start by advocating for the inclusion of all relevant design professionals (namely Licensed Technologist OAA and Interior Designers) in the policy. I believe by working together and removing any unnecessary divisions can only elevate the importance of good design to everyone. I do not see this as an issue tied to an individual’s scope, but to their desire to do better and wanting to be held to a higher standard (one of the reasons I became a member of a professional organization). I believe celebrating the diversity of design professionals and creating inclusive dialogues with the public would create a positive shift in the culture of architecture.
 
A2.
I can see some benefit in allowing all members to vote for all electoral districts. I imagine electoral districts were formed to guarantee geographic diversity in council members and by having everyone vote for each seat clarifies that council serves in protecting the public interest and not just addressing regional issues.

A3. 
Engaging membership can be difficult and everyone has different reasons why they do not vote, participate in discussions, or sit on committees. I have experience with different organizations and the discussion regarding participation comes up frequently. There is no clear solution to this issue. I think serving on a board, council, or committee creates a level of understanding you cannot obtain from simply being a member, but not everyone is interested or capable of that level of involvement.
This is not something that can change over night, but there has been positive momentum recently through the addition of both the Intern Architect and Licensed Technologist OAA seat on council. This provided the opportunity for them to become more engaged. Forming this trust early on can increase the members engagement later in their career.



Nicola Russo 
(Answers below)

A1
. Canada is ready for such a policy. It is up to elected officials, builders and designers to create a common and distinctive vision for Canada’s architectural model. It is important that we reflect our country’s identity and specificity in the built environment.
Initiatives to achieve this:
-Produce and distribute a reference guide to define and assess quality in architecture, as well as objectives regarding sustainability, accessibility, and reconciliation.
-Ensure regional diversity by supporting municipalities in implementing their own unique architectural policies within the overall national policy guidelines.
-Organize events, exchanges and debates on architecture and mobilize ambassadors to promote architecture. 
-Offer informational activities outlining the importance of the services provided by and the added value offered by architects to key stakeholders (elected officials, architects, clients and journalists who contribute to the development of their region to develop with them a vision for an architecturally rich and diverse country). 

A2.
Allowing to vote for all electoral districts could foster greater engagement since individual members would have a greater influence on the overall makeup of the elected council. 

A3.
It is important the OAA have a thorough and comprehensive understanding of its members, their expectations, their needs and their concerns related to their practice, as sole proprietors or working within firms, as well as those in research and academia. The intent is to have a better understanding of their real world experiences. Along with this knowledge, it is important to take a regular stand on matters regarding and affecting architectural professionals on both local and national matters. Along with protecting the public, if the members feel the association is working for them and for their best interests, they will respond with greater engagement in its governance.



Dana Seguin 
(Answers not yet provided)


Province of Ontario - Intern Architect Seat (Non-Voting)

Total seats: 1
Seats available: 1

Heather Breeze
(Candidate Statement)
Nick Borcescu
(Candidate Statement not yet provided)  
Kasmin Devashrayee
(Candidate Statement)
Jean-Francois Jacques
(Candidate Statement)
Lizbeth Guzman Javalera
(Candidate Statement)
Snober Khan 
(Candidate Statement)   
Aidan Mitchelmore
(Candidate Statement
Kiana Mozayyan Esfahani
(Candidate Statement)
Kayla Murrell 
(Candidate Statement)
Adebimpe Oshisanya Agboola
(Candidate Statement)
Suzan Saeid Abushama
(Candidate Statement)



CANDIDATE QUESTIONS & ANSWERS

Q1. Will you support the development of a national architecture policy for Canada and what specifically will you do, at the council level, to support awareness of the architecture policy initiative and, more broadly, do to raise awareness about the importance of architecture to society as a whole?

Q2. Geographic representation is important in the governance of the association. This is why six electoral districts are established in Regulation 27. Voting is restricted so that one can only vote for the Province of Ontario district and their district of record. Given that Councilors do not, in fact, represent these electoral districts, do you think allowing all members to vote for all electoral districts would be beneficial to the association? (candidates would still need to have an address of record in the district to run)

Q3. Are there other ways to engage the membership to increase participation in elections and governance?




Heather Breeze (Answers below)

A1. I do support the development of a national architecture policy for Canada. It can an exercise that aids in the promotion of Canadian-specific design and construction styles, while still retaining regional diversity as a key component. I believe it could be a fantastic opportunity to further shape the identity of Canadian architecture, as well as provide education to society at large. The RAIC has a role to play here in partnering with provincial bodies to work on more external, public-facing connection between architects and the communities in which we operate.

A2.
Regional representation in a field as professionally complex as architecture, in a country as geographically complex as Canada, is essential. Maintaining a locational link between candidates and those that are voting for them underscores the responsibility of the future Council member to act within their capacity as the voice of this constituency. This allows for cultivation of relationships between members who can continue to make decisions and suggestions within their region of practice that they know best.

A3.
Increased transparency and understanding of governance within the OAA on a year-round basis, outside of election period, would lead to increased engagement during elections. We could begin to more actively and commonly discuss matters of governance, hold larger town halls or conversations in regards to governance or internal workings, and provide continual information and feedback to members who are provided with the tools to ask questions and voice concerns at any time.



Nick Borcescu
 (Candidate Statement and answers not yet provided)   
Kasmin Devashrayee 
(Answers not yet provided)



Jean-Francois Jacques 
(Answers below)

A1
. Yes, I will seek to further support the development of a national architecture policy as OAA councilor. In development since 2016, this aspirational document is crucial to achieving progress regarding climate change, the built environment, and our profession. Mobilizing in support of the national architecture policy of Canada, is an effective way to promote public discussion, member engagement, and to elevate the role of architecture in society, all the while remaining within the OAA’s regulatory mandate.  This document also manifests a professional crossroads for Canadian architects. Whereas a national architecture policy could begin to provide the federal framework needed to more effectively address clients, the public and all stakeholders; a failure to materialize this document after five years, would signify a lack of capability and influence. For all these reasons and more, the development of a national architecture policy is a worthwhile objective around which to rally the OAA membership.  

Here is how I will begin to support our national architecture policy as OAA councilor: 

a) I will look to see if further advocating for this document could be an effective means by which to create a truly public facing campaign that collaterally supports the architect. 

b) As support for this document falls within both the OAA and RAIC’s mandates, I will endeavor to encourage members and governance of both organizations to further support each other when championing this issue. 

c) I will seek to promote this document via the OAA’s current range of regulatory outreach programs.

d) I will look to leverage our membership in the Construction and Design Alliance of Ontario (CDAO).  Where our interests are aligned, I would push for greater partnership on this issue. 

e) As Scandinavian countries have benefited from similar documents for over thirty years, the most conclusive arguments for such policy are to be found in their data and their results. I will therefore look to for support from sister organizations in these countries. 

f) I will look to support the national architecture policy of Canada by attempting to determine the existing architectural mandates that this document could further safeguard, as well as the standards and roles that this document could further provide architects if enacted.  This document should fashion, and be fashioned by, new areas of architectural expertise that only architects should be mandated to provide.  Both scenarios, will require the OAA to work with CALA and its eleven provincial and territorial regulators so as to finesse the document towards supporting the need for, and the delineation of, these new qualifications.  Doing so could broaden the architectural tent, and protect the current edges of the profession all the while serving the public interest.

g) Though indirect, perhaps the most effective means of promotion is to increase our membership, so that we can finally, as has been previously been considered, support a provincial level organization solely dedicated to advocating for the profession.

A2.  Ideal electoral methods are subject to change as the scale, and the nature of the membership changes. As councilor, I will be keen to understand whether the needs of the Act, and the need for diverse representation and broad participation are all being fulfilled by the current electoral process.

That being said, my current understanding leads me to believe that allowing members to vote for all electoral districts would not, on the whole, be beneficial to the OAA. It would not necessarily further mitigate the potential for councilors to support their district at the expense of the public interest. It could, in fact, increase the potential for the articulation of special interests if, for instance, Toronto selected all councilors. Most importantly, though this scenario might provide additional engagement due to inter-district participation, it is more likely to lead to less participation and less diversity on the whole, due to the disenfranchisement of smaller communities as their votes are superseded those of more populous districts.


A3.
Yes, more engagement should and can be achieved. Here’s how I will begin to attempt to increase member participation in elections and governance: 

a) Civic attitudes are best developed early on. I will endeavor to further develop the relationship between CUSA, individual universities, and the OAA.  A good first step towards this goal would be to consider allowing university representatives to be elected to non-voting OAA council seats, so that they may voice their concerns, and educate students and faculty as to the role and actions of the OAA.

b) I will study the possibility of upgrading the intern’s non-voting seat to a voting seat, with the goal of providing interns more of an actual stake in the election.  Alternatively, more non- voting seats could be provided to interns.  There are, after all, interns with varied concerns in all electoral districts that may wish to learn about the OAA’s governance.

c) This question/answer format is a great way to learn more about candidates.  I will look to provide more opportunities for candidates to inform the public of their policies. 

d) The incentive to participate in governance is proportional to the governing bodies’ ability to affect change.  As councilor, I will continuously endeavor to enact such change, by leveraging the OAA’s regulatory objective so as to expand the profession’s mandate.



Lizbeth Guzman Javalera 
(Answers below)

A1.
Due to the differences in our climate and geography across the country, I don't believe we should have a stringent defining policy for national architecture. Each region, and more so, its provincial organizations are adequate at exercising what is best for each of our climate zones and densities.  Oftentimes, even the current provincial architectural policies are often restrictive enough and make it difficult to be even more creative with the urban typologies that exist across our diverse landscapes.  I think having diversity is the best way to allow for creativity to flourish and already believe policy is somewhat creativity suppressing in some locations in regards to what is deemed acceptable or allowed to be built.  Having architectural policies is good for the safety and comfort of our building users and citizens alike but too much restriction can also be innovation adverse and creativity bounding. I think our National Building Code does a well enough job to keep a National consensus on what architecture is allowed to be produced and associations like the RAIC do a good job to keep us all connected as Canadian Architects. However, imposing more restrictions through a national policy isn't something I would perceive as good for the production of architecture that continues to push the creative boundaries and shapes the way we live across Canada.  In such a diverse landscape, we should be pushing for more creativity not more restriction.  An additional policy to adhere to would add layers of complex regulation that would stifle what is produced and would homogenize further what we create.

A2.
Since you can perceive my strong adherence to diversity and regional representation, you may understand that in this regard as well I think that each electoral district should stick to voting for its own constituency as it is the location that they would know best. If those in urban centres are allowed to vote for rural locations and vice versa, those representatives may not have enough understanding of the challenges faced in order to make a sound decision for them.  

A3.
I think in more recent years, the OAA has improved and updated not only its building and website, but it has started to ask for more direct opinion of its members in many matters. This kind of direct involvement with its participants is starting to create a more open approach to the way decisions are made and in turn creating a wave of more attention being paid to matters like elections. By continuing to create more campaigns that market what is being done and asking more opinions of its members, we all start to feel like we matter and can make a difference.  Our collaboration in matters that are important also provides a better understanding of what really happens behind closed doors in council.  This engagement is having a positive impact and in turn enabling collaboration which will continue to make a difference in coming years especially with the new generation of architects.  Having conversations like this is what helps to get others out to vote and participate in more ways. Continuing both the collaboration and increased transparency will increase engagement and I support it thoroughly. I'd be open to public discussions to hear more of what others have to say about various issues would seek opinion from intern members if elected.  Understanding who we represent and working to make sure all opinions are weighed in, is part of what I hope will make you guys come out and vote!




Snober Khan 
(Answers not yet provided) 


 
Aidan Mitchelmore 
(Answers below) 

A1. As the Intern Architect Seat on council, I would support any initiative that aims to increase the public’s awareness of architecture. Specifically, at council level I am interested in how the OAA could help the profession create standards for higher quality architecture. These may include initiatives that support energy efficiency, sustainably sourced materials, or design excellence. I believe strong engagement with the public is critical to the health of the profession. Sharing the stories of some of Canada’s best buildings with the public may be a way to invite a broader audience to participate in the profession. Working with groups such as the RAIC and TSA could be a valuable in an outreach strategy

A2. As the OAA council governs on behalf of the public interest, I believe it is essential that we maintain representation from around the province. From what I’ve seen, practicing architecture in Toronto can be very different from practicing in Windsor, Sudbury, or rural Ontario. As a whole it is essential that the OAA governs with consideration of all parts of the Provence. I believe that architects residing within these jurisdictions should have control over who they elect to council.

A3. Participation in the OAA elections has been historically low. I think the health of the profession depends on increasing participation and engagement from its members, and the greater community beyond. Increased transparency within the OAA invites discussion from its membership. The OAA could also engage more closely with its younger members, and Intern Architects through offering resources that could facilitate their path to licensure. Perhaps increasing the accessibility of the OAA conference (through lower fees, or through free virtual events) could also allow the OAA to engage more actively with its membership.

 



Kiana Mozayyan Esfahani 
(Answers not yet provided)



Kayla Murrell  
(Answers below)

A1.
I support the development of a national architecture policy for Canada and I would play my part in continuing the conversation with peers and individuals in local associations and architectural bodies to provide an understanding of how such a policy could have positive impacts on the profession and society as a whole. 

These local organizations would ideally work with the OAA and the RAIC to promote design excellence and advocate for a more sustainable built environment. Giving professions and clients a clear guide on how to positively shape our future by developing responsible projects that improve our quality of life, and inspire equitable communities would encourage consistency of high quality buildings in a Canadian context. 

A2.
It is important to have regional representation to speak to the issues in each geographic location. The best way for this to occur is for both candidates and voters to be from the same electoral district. This way matters that directly impact each electoral district can be voiced to a representative which may also may encourage additional regional engagement.  

A3.
It is important to provide simple and efficient measures to encourage participation. The easier it is to receive information and be a part of the discussion the more engagement the OAA will receive. Such measures could be in the form of a town hall meeting before council meetings to have members weigh in on current issues. This could also be in the form of a supported unstructured learning discussion group. I am envisioning an office group that is provided summaries by the OAA of issues OAA Committees and Council are tackling. This way office groups could  take an hour or two to discuss OAA topics of interest. 

I also believe encouraging participation in elections and governance involves encouraging the membership and future members to become more aware of the depth and breadth of the OAA’s governance and structures. Engaging real topics discussed in council meetings with professionals and students may be a way to encourage awareness of the types of issues governing the OAA encounters. Students could practice generating solutions to such problems by forming an OAA student council (a collaborative exercise). The relevance and accuracy of final decisions could be discussed in a short paper to the OAA explaining why they believe the following steps should be taken, thus preparing them for engagement in governance when they become members. 



Adebimpe Oshisanya Agboola 
(Answers not yet provided)



Suzan Saeid Abushama 
(Answers below)

A1. I graduated from Ecole National Superior d’Architecture de Grenoble in France with a degree in Architecture and Urban Design ( six-year program, including one-year in research). To support the development of a national policy for Canada, I have experience in researching, analyzing, and making recommendation-based documentation and surveys. I created an Internal Project Development Process. Also, I promoted program through Region, influenced the community partners, facilitated workshops, responded to media interviews, and maintained a relationship with governmental and private sectors. . And as a member of the Community Public Art Advisory Committee, City of Windsor, I am acquainted with policy applications

A2. In my opinion, the more representatives there the more significantly the information will be speeded to communities. 

A3. Virtual and social media became the most effective engaging platforms for all groups of people with high results. There will be no geographical restrictions reach out to everyone.






QUESTIONS?

Contact the Office of the Registrar

REFERENCES

Architects Act
Regulation